Family calls 911 for help with special needs daughter, cops show up & shoot her dead


B00Mer
#1
Family requests paramedics for their special needs daughter in 911 call — armed officers show up and things only get worse



San Mateo police have a lot to answer for after the tragic shooting death of 18-year-old Yanira Serrano, KRON reports.

The authorities claim that the deputy who fatally shot Serrano did so in self-defense, though Serrano’s family tells a much different account.

“Deputies arrived on scene,” Sheriff’s department spokeswoman Rebecca Rosenblatt said. “Shortly thereafter there was a confrontation where the deputy was in fear for his life and as a result he fired his weapon.”

Serrano’s family claims that they called 911 because Yanira, who has special needs, was refusing to take her medication. They were expecting paramedics to show up and were surprised when armed officers arrived on the scene.

“She has special needs and we just want answers,” the woman’s brother, Tiny Serrano says. “Who are we supposed to call now when we need help when who is supposed to help us is killing our kids?”

The officer who shot Serrano is on paid administrative leave and the district attorney’s office as well as sheriff’s detectives are investigating the incident.

Conflicting Stories Follow San Mateo County Officer Involved Shooting - YouTube



source: » Family Calls 911 For Help With Special Needs Daughter, Cops Show Up And Shoot Her Dead Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your mind!
 
QuebecCanadian
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Family requests paramedics for their special needs daughter in 911 call — armed officers show up and things only get worse



San Mateo police have a lot to answer for after the tragic shooting death of 18-year-old Yanira Serrano, KRON reports.

The authorities claim that the deputy who fatally shot Serrano did so in self-defense, though Serrano’s family tells a much different account.

“Deputies arrived on scene,” Sheriff’s department spokeswoman Rebecca Rosenblatt said. “Shortly thereafter there was a confrontation where the deputy was in fear for his life and as a result he fired his weapon.”

Serrano’s family claims that they called 911 because Yanira, who has special needs, was refusing to take her medication. They were expecting paramedics to show up and were surprised when armed officers arrived on the scene.

“She has special needs and we just want answers,” the woman’s brother, Tiny Serrano says. “Who are we supposed to call now when we need help when who is supposed to help us is killing our kids?”

The officer who shot Serrano is on paid administrative leave and the district attorney’s office as well as sheriff’s detectives are investigating the incident.

Conflicting Stories Follow San Mateo County Officer Involved Shooting - YouTube



source: » Family Calls 911 For Help With Special Needs Daughter, Cops Show Up And Shoot Her Dead Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your mind!

Holy crap! There has to be more to this story. Why the cop thought his life was in danger...what was her medication for and what was her behaviour like without it? Yikes!!
 
Sal
#3
wow, this is one of those truly tragic occurrences where they just did not know how to access her and respond so now she is dead
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+3
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by QuebecCanadianView Post

Holy crap! There has to be more to this story. Why the cop thought his life was in danger...what was her medication for and what was her behaviour like without it? Yikes!!

Obviously the poor cop could not defend himself without lethal force against a special needs girl without a weapon.
 
JLM
+2
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

wow, this is one of those truly tragic occurrences where they just did not know how to access her and respond so now she is dead


Yep, deja vu Vancouver airport 2007 all over again!
 
Sal
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

Yep, deja vu Vancouver airport 2007 all over again!

yeah, pretty much
 
JLM
+2
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

yeah, pretty much


Yep, and I'll bet this one will carry on for another 7 years without answers! Speaking of which when ARE they going to conclude the Robert Dziekanski case and get the miscreants behind bars, before the A$$holes start dying of old age?
 
SLM
#8
Most police services do not receiving adequate training in dealing with mental illness or anyone with a high needs behavioural condition. I don't say this to denigrate them, but they just don't. They absolutely should, the police forces are supposed to serve and protect all members of society.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+4
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Most police services do not receiving adequate training in dealing with mental illness or anyone with a high needs behavioural condition. I don't say this to denigrate them, but they just don't. They absolutely should, the police forces are supposed to serve and protect all members of society.

The 911 operator's role should also be questioned here. Clearly she misunderstood the needs of the callers.
 
SLM
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

The 911 operator's role should also be questioned here. Clearly she misunderstood the needs of the callers.

Yes, you're absolutely right. It's hard to judge too harshly given that on approach the officer may not have had the best of information, given what the father was actually calling for.

But, generally speaking, there have just been so many instances of police taking the same approach with the mentally ill (or even just an ill person) that they would take with an out of control criminal (like being aggressive), that I think something needs to be addressed in our police services.

It took a long time for police to being properly trained in how to deal with domestic disputes, but now there are standard procedures in place and they know how to approach those situations which are a bit different than other calls they get.
 
JLM
#11
After dialing 911 a menu should come up -


Intruder with gun - press 1
All other intruders - press 2
Medical emergency - press 3
Fire - press 4
Flood - press 5
Kid won't take his/her meds- press 6
Kid won't go to bed - press 7
Kid won't eat his/her supper - press 8
 
Tecumsehsbones
+5
#12  Top Rated Post
Need somebody killed - press 9
 
taxslave
+2
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Need somebody killed - press 9

That would be the direct line to the cop shop.
 
gopher
+1
#14
they used to be called peace officers but not any more - this is one example why
 
B00Mer
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

they used to be called peace officers but not any more - this is one example why

So what do YOU call them..

Just to think everyone admiring police work when the 3 peace officers where slaughtered in Canada, not emotions swing the other way..
 
gopher
+2
#16
That indeed was a tragedy.

But so was the Eleanor Bumpers and "Wilding" incidents both of which were of police criminal conduct. We have an on going thread which lists many more such incidents.
 
Sal
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

So what do YOU call them..

Just to think everyone admiring police work when the 3 peace officers where slaughtered in Canada, not emotions swing the other way..

the tragic and senseless death of 3 RCMP officers does not white-wash all police

they should not be used as examples of average police, each cop is an individual...some are amazing at their job others not so much and the reasons for that are varied
 
QuebecCanadian
#18
A little more info..

Teen fatally shot in Half Moon Bay by deputy had knife | www.ktvu.com

She had a knife and if the call mentioned that then dispatching police instead of ambulance made perfect sense. But there should be another method for stopping someone with a knife. Rubber bullets? Shoot her in the arm? You would think they train these officers to shoot without killing as a means to subdue ....no?
 
Sal
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by QuebecCanadianView Post

A little more info..

Teen fatally shot in Half Moon Bay by deputy had knife | www.ktvu.com

She had a knife and if the call mentioned that then dispatching police instead of ambulance made perfect sense. But there should be another method for stopping someone with a knife. Rubber bullets? Shoot her in the arm? You would think they train these officers to shoot without killing as a means to subdue ....no?

oh my god...so horrible...a lot of people including the cop and his family are left to deal with a horrible tragedy

we had a knife incident here in Toronto where the guy was on a bus...he too was shot to death...

this issue of people who are mentally ill and highly agitated picking up a kitchen knife needs to be dealt with in some other way than gun fire.
 
SLM
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by QuebecCanadianView Post

A little more info..

Teen fatally shot in Half Moon Bay by deputy had knife | www.ktvu.com

She had a knife and if the call mentioned that then dispatching police instead of ambulance made perfect sense. But there should be another method for stopping someone with a knife. Rubber bullets? Shoot her in the arm? You would think they train these officers to shoot without killing as a means to subdue ....no?

Rubber bullets, maybe. Shooting in the arm? No. I know very little about guns and hitting targets, but I do know that is not realistic as a plan of action.


Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

oh my god...so horrible...a lot of people including the cop and his family are left to deal with a horrible tragedy

we had a knife incident here in Toronto where the guy was on a bus...he too was shot to death...

this issue of people who are mentally ill and highly agitated picking up a kitchen knife needs to be dealt with in some other way than gun fire.

See I can't throw all the blame on the police officer here, if, as the article states, she came at deputies with a knife then in that situation he was justified in defending his life and the lives of others.

But I do agree that there needs to be more thought and planning into how to deal with mentally ill individuals before the 911 call comes in.

This is how I look at it. An individual who is not mentally ill can also be in an agitated state and potentially dangerous but they can, possibly, still be reasoned with. So a threat of force from police, stated or simply implied by their presence is often enough to get through to said individual. Sometimes not, but then they are making that choice of their own volition. Someone who is mentally ill probably can not be reasoned with. But at the end of the day someone coming at an officer with a knife or other weapon is still just as much of a threat, irrespective of whether they are mentally ill or not. Knowing ahead of time that a potentially mentally ill individual may need to be confronted and having some kind of plan in place to try to subdue such individuals without deadly force is the best that can be done.

But whatever that plan is, it still may come down to someone being shot and killed.
 
Sal
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Rubber bullets, maybe. Shooting in the arm? No. I know very little about guns and hitting targets, but I do know that is not realistic as a plan of action.
See I can't throw all the blame on the police officer here, if, as the article states, she came at deputies with a knife then in that situation he was justified in defending his life and the lives of others.
But I do agree that there needs to be more thought and planning into how to deal with mentally ill individuals before the 911 call comes in.
This is how I look at it. An individual who is not mentally ill can also be in an agitated state and potentially dangerous but they can, possibly, still be reasoned with. So a threat of force from police, stated or simply implied by their presence is often enough to get through to said individual. Sometimes not, but then they are making that choice of their own volition. Someone who is mentally ill probably can not be reasoned with. But at the end of the day someone coming at an officer with a knife or other weapon is still just as much of a threat, irrespective of whether they are mentally ill or not. Knowing ahead of time that a potentially mentally ill individual may need to be confronted and having some kind of plan in place to try to subdue such individuals without deadly force is the best that can be done.

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
exactly right...a knife from the kitchen depending upon what type of knife can do a lot of damage quite quickly...once someone moves in on another with a knife it could be difficult to intervene depending upon their mental state.

BlackLeaf posted a BBC program...Madness in the Fast Lane...it was amazing to see two slender woman (who had been hit by cars) with the physical ability to take on multiple police and still escape. It was almost unbelieveable to watch what focused determination can do. One of the women did eventually days later stab a man to death. It was an eye opener.

So once this young woman produced the knife she was a danger to everyone certainly. BUT there are other ways to deal with this other than gun fire if one is trained.

de-escalating someone who is mentally ill...takes a certain approach...you need the training to call upon to do this because once the situation occurs you have to go on instinct and with no skills that could be a disaster as it was here...anyone can do it if they approach it correctly but there are ways to handle such occurrences and some just don't work. It certainly didn't here.
 
SLM
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post


de-escalating someone who is mentally ill...takes a certain approach...you need the training to call upon to do this because once the situation occurs you have to go on instinct and with no skills that could be a disaster as it was here...anyone can do it if they approach it correctly but there are ways to handle such occurrences and some just don't work. It certainly didn't here.

This is exactly what I've been saying for a long time now. In reference to my post yesterday, at one time police did not really have knowledge and skills to deal with domestic situations, but now they do. Knowledge and skill set for dealing with mentally ill individuals can be set up, pre-planning for certain situations and eventualities can be put in place. It won't mean the outcome will be guaranteed, it never is, and deadly force may still need to be used at some times, but a thought out, well planned effort can save some lives, I'm sure of it.
 
Sal
+1
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

This is exactly what I've been saying for a long time now. In reference to my post yesterday, at one time police did not really have knowledge and skills to deal with domestic situations, but now they do. Knowledge and skill set for dealing with mentally ill individuals can be set up, pre-planning for certain situations and eventualities can be put in place. It won't mean the outcome will be guaranteed, it never is, and deadly force may still need to be used at some times, but a thought out, well planned effort can save some lives, I'm sure of it.

yes, social workers/mental health workers are trained in such ways...even if they had a number of officers trained for that particular type of situation that could go out on such calls it would help

i know I have had a few situations when I was working in not for profit and encountering on a daily basis people with extreme mental health issues and it becomes second nature...you quickly learn what subtle body movements and eye movements indicate. ( and I was in no way deeply trained) You have staff who you can call who know exactly what to do for high de-escalations...and there's a code you can call and all staff come from everywhere in the building in under a minute usually.

I left the company and have done a few call-backs as a favour and first day on the desk a few years ago I had a street person approach me for paper....I asked him if he needed good paper or just some scrap paper...he went off like a rocket...did he look like fuking scrap to me he screamed...he came right at me...it threw me off completely for a few seconds...it's weird how your brain literally scrambles to assess what is happening and it quickly finds the door in the brain to access your training...you conclude super quickly...possible schizophrenic and respond calmly and according to how you have been trained...I thought my fuking heart would come through my chest, your ears literally ring from the adrenaline buzz...lol... if I had been working there daily, it would have ramped up the pulse to alert for danger but I would not have had the type of adrenaline rush I had

so these guys(cops) are trained much more intensely than that for a number of years...which makes me wonder what happened in that situation...is it total panic? I don't quite get it...

I sympathize but it is puzzling.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by QuebecCanadianView Post

A little more info..

Teen fatally shot in Half Moon Bay by deputy had knife | www.ktvu.com

She had a knife and if the call mentioned that then dispatching police instead of ambulance made perfect sense. But there should be another method for stopping someone with a knife. Rubber bullets? Shoot her in the arm? You would think they train these officers to shoot without killing as a means to subdue ....no?

It is my understanding that this type of situation is what they given tazers for. The least amount of force required to contain the situation. Negotiation by a trained individual may have also diffused the situation.
 
Sal
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

It is my understanding that this type of situation is what they given tazers for. The least amount of force required to contain the situation. Negotiation by a trained individual may have also diffused the situation.

it is confusing how this could occur
 
QuebecCanadian
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Rubber bullets, maybe. Shooting in the arm? No. I know very little about guns and hitting targets, but I do know that is not realistic as a plan of action.

You would think those trained to use firearms for their occupation would be trained on where is NOT a kill zone. It seems to me that there are a lot more of those than fatal areas like head and heart. In fact I think you'd have to be pretty precise to get vital organs. Hell anywhere below the waist. Do they all just go right for the easier head shot?I'm not talking your average Joe. I'm talking professionals trained in firearms. I dunno, seems common sense against a knife.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

It is my understanding that this type of situation is what they given tazers for. The least amount of force required to contain the situation. Negotiation by a trained individual may have also diffused the situation.

Tasers, batons, tiger nets. Shotguns, by the way. QC is right, the "shoot him in the arm" thing is a fantasy and bad doctrine, but shotguns can be loaded with light shot or rubber bullets. We (the U.S. and Canada) seem to have abandoned "minimum force necessary to subdue" in favour of cops fearing for their lives.
 
SLM
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by QuebecCanadianView Post

You would think those trained to use firearms for their occupation would be trained on where is NOT a kill zone. It seems to me that there are a lot more of those than fatal areas like head and heart. In fact I think you'd have to be pretty precise to get vital organs. Hell anywhere below the waist. Do they all just go right for the easier head shot?I'm not talking your average Joe. I'm talking professionals trained in firearms. I dunno, seems common sense against a knife.

I've never fired a gun, never even held one and am in no way a professional trained in firearms. But it seems to me that hitting a smaller target like legs or arms becomes a very difficult thing to do when they are flailing about as they come directly at you with a knife. Which is why, I believe, the training is to shoot at center mass, not the head but the body.

Also, if you stop and think about it, chances of missing a smaller target like arms is greater because it's small which would then mean bullets are traveling to places where you don't want them too. Such as through walls into the next room/apartments etc and potentially hitting completely innocent people. Stray bullets are exceedingly dangerous and I for one do not want them coming out of police officer's guns.
 
Sal
#29
yeah I would guess center mass is also to protect those around the perp...even if you hit someone it can exit and travel further

not even to mention a shot in some body parts will not stop someone...people can keep going for a long time after being shot
 
SLM
+1
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Tasers, batons, tiger nets. Shotguns, by the way. QC is right, the "shoot him in the arm" thing is a fantasy and bad doctrine, but shotguns can be loaded with light shot or rubber bullets. We (the U.S. and Canada) seem to have abandoned "minimum force necessary to subdue" in favour of cops fearing for their lives.

I still think in addition to the equipment a lot of education and work developing skills for verbally subduing individuals would go a long way. Not suggesting that alone would always do the trick but you start with that, you have non lethal equipment to back it up and, in the end, you use lethal force when that doesn't work and it becomes necessary.
 
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