Deep Space

Socrates the Greek
+1
#1  Top Rated Post


HubbleSite - NewsCenter - Exotic

I feel very humble looking at this cosmos.
We are not alone!
Last edited by Socrates the Greek; Mar 2nd, 2009 at 09:03 PM..
 
petros
#2
Quote:

We are not alone!

I wonder if any of those planets are flat?
 
Francis2004
#3
Damn, I thought this was a political thread about the space between two ears on a Leaders head..
 
Socrates the Greek
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

I wonder if any of those planets are flat?

Tee cunnis Petro, spherical or semi spherical seems to be the architecture of the universe’s floating masses, but who knows maybe anything that goes through a black whole gets compressed to some flat form. It sure is BIG
 
Socrates the Greek
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by SirFrancis2004View Post

Damn, I thought this was a political thread about the space between two ears on a Leaders head..

Sir Francis good day, nothing political in this thread. Space is a fascinating phenomenon and we all are a part of it.
 
petros
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Socrates the GreekView Post

Tee cunnis Petro, spherical or semi spherical seems to be the architecture of the universe’s floating masses, but who knows maybe anything that goes through a black whole gets compressed to some flat form. It sure is BIG

and stays crunchy in milk unlike those meat filled pannekoeks in Holland.
 
Francis2004
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Socrates the GreekView Post

Sir Francis good day, nothing political in this thread. Space is a fascinating phenomenon and we all are a part of it.

Good day Socrates the Greek, my little attemp at humour.

I have always been a big fan of space. Don't let the bad puns fool you. I hope to get ( even if it's cheap ) a telescope from a local store to look at planets with my son. As a kid I used to borrow my brothers and try to look at the moon and stars. It never quite cut it..

They have some nice but ones at Costco and a few other store but I really don't want to spend more then a few hundred. Just don't have the cash..
 
Johnnny
#8
learning the constellations growing up was pretty cool
 
Socrates the Greek
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SirFrancis2004View Post

Good day Socrates the Greek, my little attemp at humour.

I have always been a big fan of space. Don't let the bad puns fool you. I hope to get ( even if it's cheap ) a telescope from a local store to look at planets with my son. As a kid I used to borrow my brothers and try to look at the moon and stars. It never quite cut it..

They have some nice but ones at Costco and a few other store but I really don't want to spend more then a few hundred. Just don't have the cash..

It sure is a great hobby to pick up a telescope like you say a visit in visual and mind our neighboring planets, or galaxies, great cheap tourism $1000 for a telescope is better than a $20M space 10 day vacation. I suppose the ones who have that type of doe they can dance that way, but the teley idea works for me.
 
Francis2004
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Socrates the GreekView Post

It sure is a great hobby to pick up a telescope like you say a visit in visual and mind our neighboring planets, or galaxies, great cheap tourism $1000 for a telescope is better than a $20M space 10 day vacation. I suppose the ones who have that type of doe they can dance that way, but the teley idea works for me.

That same brother just picked one up for himself and son for about $450.00 at Sears I think he said.. It has a great Lens and all.. He can attach a camera and it has the motor on it to follow the stars for picture perfect shots..

I will look into that seeing I can't afford Hubble for now..
 
Socrates the Greek
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by SirFrancis2004View Post

That same brother just picked one up for himself and son for about $450.00 at Sears I think he said.. It has a great Lens and all.. He can attach a camera and it has the motor on it to follow the stars for picture perfect shots..

I will look into that seeing I can't afford Hubble for now..

I am sure on a very crystal clear night a $500 teley would do the job, and what a great experience that would be. At home where I live I face the south and always I see Venus shining into my living room. I am also considering in getting a telescope for around $500 it would be great entertainment when friend come over.
 
Socrates the Greek
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by JohnnnyView Post

learning the constellations growing up was pretty cool




It is fascinating how we human beings have charted only a fraction of this infinite cosmos,
.
 
petros
#13
If you live in a city and want to do some star gazing with a telescope about all you'll see is the moon and the planets. There is just far to much ambient light in the urban environment and you'll get far better results viewing to the north. To see deep space with you basic hobby scope it's is best on a new (no) Moon and in a valley with no light for miles. The colder the better as well.
 
Socrates the Greek
#14
Our 3000 year old ancestors were obsessed with deep space, and it is interesting how for many generations man in general from all walks of life, humanity has been fascinated with the unknown truth of the Universe, this complex Cosmos which fascinates us all.
 
Socrates the Greek
#15
[quote=Socrates the Greek;1059810]

HubbleSite - NewsCenter - Exotic


August 8, 2006: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has for the first time identified the parent star of a distant planet (system name OGLE-2003-BLG-235L/MOA-2003-BLG-53L) discovered in 2003 through ground-based gravitational microlensing. Gravitational microlensing occurs when a foreground star amplifies the light of a background star that momentarily aligns with it. Follow-up observations by Hubble in 2005 separated the light of the slightly offset foreground star from the background star. This allowed the host star to be identified as a red dwarf star located 19,000 light-years away. The Hubble observations allow for the planet's mass and the orbit from its parent red star to be determined. In this artist's concept, the rings and moon around the gas giant are hypothetical, but plausible, given the nature of the family of gas giant planets in our solar system.
Last edited by Socrates the Greek; Mar 2nd, 2009 at 11:49 PM..
 
Socrates the Greek
#16



August 21, 2006: Dark matter and normal matter have been wrenched apart by the tremendous collision of two large clusters of galaxies. This composite image shows the galaxy cluster 1E 0657-56, also known as the "bullet cluster." The hot gas detected by Chandra in X-rays is seen as two pink clumps in the image and contains most of the "normal" matter in the two clusters. The bullet-shaped clump on the right is the hot gas from one cluster, which passed through the hot gas from the other larger cluster during the collision. An optical image from Magellan and the Hubble Space Telescope shows the galaxies in orange and white. The blue areas in this image show where astronomers find most of the mass in the clusters. For more information about this research on the Web, visit: http://chandra.harvard.edu/press/06_releases/press_082106.html
 
Socrates the Greek
#17

YouTube - Hubble Deep Field The Most Imp Image Ever Taken Redux

 
Socrates the Greek
#18

YouTube - Mysteries of Deep Space To the Edge of Time

Last edited by Socrates the Greek; Mar 10th, 2009 at 06:51 PM..
 
Socrates the Greek
#19
Stunning Portrait of the Milky Way Galaxy





YouTube - Stunning Portrait of the Milky Way Galaxy


 
Socrates the Greek
#20
1 million never before seen Galaxies

YouTube - 1 million never before seen Galaxies

 
L Gilbert
#21
I think I gave up feeling humble about our surroundings when I was very young. Now I am just curious and sometimes thrilled.
 
Socrates the Greek
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

I think I gave up feeling humble about our surroundings when I was very young. Now I am just curious and sometimes thrilled.

I was reading the other day that the entire cosmic system from corner to corner is something like 47 Billion light years across, at the speed we do here on earth to go one light year is equal to 6 Trillion miles it will take 4000 man years to travel 1 light year, this all so ham-bulling. We are like my ancestor in mythology, Ikaros, he wanted to fly so bad he resorted to gluing wings with wax as the mythology goes and attempted to fly and did, and when got close to the sun the wax melted and the wings came off, similar here today we wished we could freely fly in physical form like Luke Skywalker any speed goes in space, what a great fantasy. I am buying a strong telescope.
 
Socrates the Greek
#23
 
Socrates the Greek
#24
 
Socrates the Greek
Socrates the Greek
#26
The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are forecast to collide in fewer than four billion years | Science | The Guardian

The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are the two heavyweights in our cosmic neighbourhood. Our home galaxy reaches 100,000 light years across, around half the width of Andromeda, but both are now known to pack more mass than 200bn suns.
The white band of the Milky Way is visible on a clear night, but the Andromeda galaxy is more than 2m light years away and rarely seen by the naked eye. They are hurtling towards each other at a million miles an hour and could meet within fewer than 4 billion years - but it is highly unlikely that planets or stars from Andromeda will hit those in the Milky Way. The space between them is equivalent to a football field between grains of sand.
While the stars and planets will pass each other, clouds of dust and gas will smash into one another, creating enormous shockwaves that force particles together so violently they form new stars. The collision will create a new galaxy, which some astronomers have nicknamed Milkomeda.
It is hard to date galaxies, but the oldest star in the Milky Way is believed to be 13bn years old. The universe is thought to be 13.8bn years old.
 
Dexter Sinister
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Socrates the GreekView Post

I am buying a strong telescope.

You'll never be sorry. And if I may make a suggestion, drop into your favourite book shop first and pick up Terence ****inson's book Nightwatch. It's one of the standard references for backyard astronomers. There's a very good section in it--Chapter 5 I think--about how to choose a telescope that's worth the $35 price tag all by itself. It'll save you many times that much by preventing you from getting the wrong equipment. Be sure to get the 4th edition, the 3rd edition may still be on the shelves and its info about celestial events expires in 2010. 4th edition's good to 2018.

Actually though, if you're just starting out, I'd suggest you begin with a sturdy tripod and a quality pair of 10x50 binoculars, they're a lot cheaper than a good telescope. You can always use those for other things than stargazing, and that equipment is good enough to show you whether you really want to get into this in a big way. And talk to #juan, he's been doing this for ages. I'm a little surprised he hasn't come into this thread, he's posted some really good photos of his own in other threads. Maybe he saw Deep Space in Arts and Entertainment and thought it was about a tv program.
 
Ron in Regina
#28
Huh...I spotted a 10x50 spotter scope with a tripod in a
recent Princess Auto flier for about $35.00 or so...would
that fit the bill? Princess Auto stores are all through the
west, I believe...
 
Socrates the Greek
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

Huh...I spotted a 10x50 spotter scope with a tripod in a
recent Princess Auto flier for about $35.00 or so...would
that fit the bill? Princess Auto stores are all through the
west, I believe...

Hay Ronn good evening, what a stimulating subject, I wan to share my experience with all of you here.

I have a friend who spend $5000 on a scope and man you have to see through it to believe the true existence of this cosmos, to give you an idea a scope of this type like my friend brought Saturn so close, you can see the moons the ring just total fascination, it is sad that man is only able to take pictures from the nearest galaxy and never be allowed to go there because of vast time differentials, the closest galaxy from our milky way galaxy is as you may know Andromeda 2.5 Billion light years away, it is said that for man to travel 1 light year will take him 4000 man years, oh my God this is far but still, to be able to see with in the milky way our galaxy which by the way as you may know it is believed to be 12,000 light years thick and close 100.000 light years across. It is astonishing to know that there is Billions of galaxies in the entire Universe like the milky way, with the same concept of planetary survival, how can it be that we are the only ones on this enigmatic cosmos. Enjoy the weekend Ron
 
Socrates the Greek
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter SinisterView Post

You'll never be sorry. And if I may make a suggestion, drop into your favourite book shop first and pick up Terence ****inson's book Nightwatch. It's one of the standard references for backyard astronomers. There's a very good section in it--Chapter 5 I think--about how to choose a telescope that's worth the $35 price tag all by itself. It'll save you many times that much by preventing you from getting the wrong equipment. Be sure to get the 4th edition, the 3rd edition may still be on the shelves and its info about celestial events expires in 2010. 4th edition's good to 2018.

Actually though, if you're just starting out, I'd suggest you begin with a sturdy tripod and a quality pair of 10x50 binoculars, they're a lot cheaper than a good telescope. You can always use those for other things than stargazing, and that equipment is good enough to show you whether you really want to get into this in a big way. And talk to #juan, he's been doing this for ages. I'm a little surprised he hasn't come into this thread, he's posted some really good photos of his own in other threads. Maybe he saw Deep Space in Arts and Entertainment and thought it was about a tv program.

Good evening Dexter, many thanks good suggestions on the book how to get the correct equipment with out breaking the bank. I am finding this subject to very invigorating and a good way not to fall a victim to the doom and glum. What a fascinating way to pass time. Thank You
 

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