Ugly American Goes Into Hiding After Killing Cecil The Lion

spaminator

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HUNTER IS HUNTED: Man attacked, killed by deer he just shot
Postmedia News
Published:
October 25, 2019
Updated:
October 25, 2019 9:28 AM EDT
(Getty Images)
Oh, deer.
In an ironic twist of fate, an Arkansas hunter lost his life after being attacked by a deer he had just shot.
Thomas Alexander, 66, had shot a buck with a muzzle-loading firearm in Yelleville when he was reportedly attacked by the wounded animal after he went to check on its condition. According to news station KY3, the still very much alive deer left several puncture wounds in the man’s body.
“I don’t know how long he left it there, but he went up to check it to make sure it was dead. And evidently it wasn’t,” said Keith Stephens, spokesperson for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.
After being ambushed by the deer, Alexander was able to call his family, who in return called authorities.
Story continues below
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The man later died in hospital. Officials have not disclosed whether his death was a result of the wounds or another cause. There are no plans for an autopsy for death confirmation.
Stephens told CBS News incidents where animals kill humans are “very rare,” noting one similar case in 2016 when a deer attacked another hunter. In that instance, the hunter survived.
Two canine units sent by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission were dispatched to find the deer, but were unsuccessful. It’s not known whether the wounded deer survived the shooting.
http://ky3.com/content/news/Hunter-dies-after-deer-attacks-him-in-Marion-County-Ark-563748531.html
http://cbsnews.com/news/deer-attacks-hunter-who-shot-it-in-arkansas
http://torontosun.com/news/weird/hunter-is-hunted-man-attacked-killed-by-deer-he-just-shot
 

Wise

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Mar 3, 2019
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Too bad for the lion.


I guess these reviews are real, because the negative reviews have not been deleted. At the same time, good reviews exist. Pictures are interesting, but sad to see dead animals.
 

spaminator

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N.Z. hunter under fire for posting kill pics
Brad Hunter
Published:
November 19, 2019
Updated:
November 20, 2019 3:54 PM EST
Lucy Rose Jaine has been hit with death threats over her hunting photos. INSTAGRAM
A Kiwi mother of three who hunts to supplement her family’s diet is under fire for posting her gory kills online.
Lucy Rose Jaine — who says her family is opposed to meat from factory farms — has been deluged with death threats.
One of the problems that have put a social media bull’s-eye on the 29-year-old’s back is her habit of posting photos with a carcass over her shoulders.
She told the U.K. Sun she started hunting when she met her husband and has since become enamoured with the outdoors.
Lucy Jaine has been hit with death threats over her hunting photos. INSTAGRAM
And Jaine said the whole family takes part when they stalk prey around five to eight times a month.
Story continues below
She said they mostly hunt wild pigs but also bag deer, goats, wallabies and others.
“I like that we can teach our children how to hunt their own food,” she told the newspaper.
Lucy Jaine has been hit with death threats over her hunting photos. INSTAGRAM
“Some guy just said, ‘I hope you die.’ I obviously didn’t respond. I hope he finds happiness.”
She called the family diet “ideal, organic and sustainable.”
Jaine added that the wild pigs can be a nuisance and hunting them “helps the farmers.”
”I’ve had a few death threats from people who just don’t have any experience with hunting,” she said. “Or maybe they are against animal cruelty. But I don’t take it to heart.”

http://thesun.co.uk/news/10363663/mum-death-threats-risque-hunting-photos-online
http://torontosun.com/news/world/n-z-hunter-under-fire-for-posting-kill-pics
 

spaminator

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BRAUN: A hunting we will go ... or maybe not
Liz Braun
Published:
November 20, 2019
Updated:
November 20, 2019 3:51 PM EST
Mule deer ignore the falling snow north of Alberta's Big Hill Springs Provincial Park on Nov. 5, 2018.Mike Drew / Postmedia Network
Where’s the beef?
Out in the Canadian woods, apparently. Blog TO (and freshdaily) want you to have a nervous breakdown because hunters are posting pictures of their kill — mostly deer — now that hunting season is upon us.
Let’s not take that bait, people. Canadian hunters have mouths to feed.
What was it Gary Dunford used to say? Everybody wants a hamburger, but nobody wants to see the meat grinder … something like that. Nobody wants to know about killing the cow and removing the hide and butchering the meat, etc. Yergh!! Pass the ketchup.
If you eat meat, you can’t really argue that hunting and posting pictures of the kill are offensive. Every hunter responding in high dudgeon to blogTO made it clear that hunting puts food on the table — a protein source most claimed to be superior to the meat from factory farmed animals available at your local grocery store.
Story continues below
Many hunters responded by pointing out the need to cull the deer herd (now that natural predators are on the wane) while others wrote about the conservation work done by hunters and fishers.
Some people referenced cultural norms; others spoke about life outside the big city.
The one thing nobody mentioned was hunting for the sake of killing things, which most would agree is some kind of abomination. Why would anyone hunt and kill an elephant or a giraffe or a wild cat?
Rule of thumb: If you can’t eat it, don’t kill it. Photos of the Eric and Donnie Trump Jr. (or anyone else) with dead animals they’ve shot for ‘sport’ are a good reminder of the many connections between cruelty to animals and cruelty to people. Is this the right place to mention that many infamous serial killers got their start in childhood, killing neighbourhood cats and dogs?
Anyone who is cruel to animals is suspect.
As for posing with the bloody dead deer you just killed and posting that photo on social media, yeah — that’s not something everyone can get behind. It’s kind of gross if that’s not your thing. On the other hand, does anyone really want to see pictures of your car or your lunch or your naked bum? They do not, but these photos are also posted by people on the regular. So chacun son gout, which is one of those fancy French phrases that is difficult to translate but more or less means everyone likes his own goat best.
If it bothers you that people eat deer at all — Bambiiii! — remember that the Chinese, Italians and Mexicans (among many others) eat horse meat and Koreans and Nigerians eat dog.
North Americans eat spareribs from a dear, smart, pink little piggie but would never, ever eat Fido! Go figure.
In New Guinea, the Biyani and Korowai tribes allegedly still eat people.
Let’s hope they have no access to social media.
http://instagram.com/p/B4-o-JJFJ0U
http://instagram.com/heritagenorthoutdoors
http://instagram.com/antlerobsessiontrophymix
http://freshdaily.ca/news/2019/11/canadian-hunters-photos-dead-animals
http://peta.org/issues/animal-compa...heets/animal-abuse-human-abuse-partners-crime
http://torontosun.com/news/local-news/braun-a-hunting-we-will-go-or-maybe-not
 

spaminator

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SHOOTING RUDOLPH: Outrage after trophy hunters shoot wild reindeer
Postmedia News
Published:
December 16, 2019
Updated:
December 16, 2019 11:23 AM EST
(Getty Images)
WARNING: Pictures are of graphic nature
Nothing gets hunters into the spirit of the holiday season than by shooting Rudolph in the wild.
A Scottish-based sport hunting agency is offering trophy hunters with deep pockets the opportunity to hunt wild reindeer in the wild at national parks in Norway, and that news isn’t sitting too well with animal lovers online.
According to The Daily Star, Fife, Scotland-based Hendry, Ramsay and Waters has trips available for people to target the animals synonymous with Christmas with their hunting rifles. The wild reindeer are reportedly the last surviving population of its kind in Europe and they live in two of Norway’s largest national parks.
Wealthy trophy hunters paying to shoot wild reindeer in Norway causes anger from anti-hunting campaigners http://t.co/oLJEv82hpU
— Daily Mail Online (@MailOnline) December 15, 2019
“We have full exclusivity in both the Breheimen and Jotunheimen national parks, which hold Europe’s last-surviving population of wild reindeer, which have been hunted here since the Ice Age,” Hendry, Ramsay and Waters states on its website. “The Jotunheimen national park reopens this year after being closed to all hunting for the past eight years, so this untouched territory will really be worth a visit.”
Pictures shared online depict proud hunters with their bloody kills.
The hunting isn’t sitting too well with Nick Weston of League Against Cruel Sports, a U.K.-based animal welfare non-profit organization.
“It’s hardly in the spirit of Christmas to shoot Rudolph, is it?” Weston told The Daily Star. “There is no justification for shooting animals for fun at any time of the year, but to celebrate Christmas by killing Santa’s reindeer doesn’t really keep with the season of goodwill.
“When will we learn that animals are not commodities and give them the gift of life instead of needlessly killing them?”
It’s estimated that there are about 200,000 reindeer in Norway. The animals travel long distances looking for lichen a form of algae commonly known as reindeer moss.
In addition to reindeer, Hendry, Ramsay and Waters also offer opportunities to hunt moose, bears, wolves, kudu, zebra, antelope and bushbuck.

http://scothunt.co.uk/hunting-locations/norway
http://dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/sick-trophy-hunters-paying-shoot-21097893
http://dailymail.co.uk/news/article...ot-Rudolph-Anger-reindeer-hunting-Norway.html
http://torontosun.com/news/world/shooting-rudolph-outrage-after-trophy-hunters-shoot-wild-reindeer
 

spaminator

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GRUESOME DISCOVERY: Poachers kill 16 lions in South Africa, hack off paws and faces
Postmedia News
Published:
January 6, 2020
Updated:
January 6, 2020 2:18 PM EST
An African lion.iStock / Getty Images
It was a gruesome discovery for Gert Blom.
The South African animal breeder and bush lodge owner found a total of 16 lions dead due to poisoning last week, with their paws and parts of their faces hacked off by poachers.
“They had hacked off 32 paws for the claws and eight of their snouts for their teeth after killing them with poisoned chicken which is a really agonizing death for the lions,” Blom said, according to The Daily Mail.
“It is cruelty that is beyond belief and an absolutely terrible sight to behold when you see magnificent predators lying there covered in flies minus their faces and their paws.”
Blom, who owns Predators Rock Bush Lodge in Rustenburg near Pretoria, awoke Friday morning and didn’t hear the lion pride roaring. He went to their enclosure and discovered six lions and two lionesses missing, along with two cubs. He followed trails made by the animals being dragged on the grass to an area outside the perimeter wall and made the grisly find.
Story continues below
Following a post mortem, Blom determined both lionesses were about to give birth to three cubs each.
“With the eight dead cubs — six unborn and the two that were almost certainly poisoned from their mother’s milk — that means the poachers effectively killed 16 lions,” Blom said.
However, one cub was found lucky to be alive and is being bottle-fed by Blom.
Blom added he found four sets of footprints on the property.
Local police launched an investigation but have yet to make an arrest.
http://dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7851153/Poachers-slaughter-16-lions-hack-faces-claws.html
http://torontosun.com/news/world/gr...lions-in-south-africa-hack-off-paws-and-faces
 

spaminator

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'HE DIDN'T STOP': Seal attack leaves defenceless hunter with shredded leg
Canadian Press
Published:
January 31, 2020
Updated:
January 31, 2020 4:05 PM EST
A colony of grey seals basks in the sun on a sand shelf in Chatham Harbor in Chatham, Mass., Thursday, Sept. 28, 2006. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Julia Cumes)JULIA CUMES / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTREAL — A Quebec hunter had to be airlifted to hospital this week following what was described as a rare seal attack on a Nova Scotia island.
Alexis Boudreault, 29, and nine other hunters were on Pictou Island Tuesday when the attack occurred. Only four of them were carrying hakapiks — clubs tipped with sharp hooks — after federal fisheries officers confiscated the tools from the others earlier in the day because their hooks were judged to be too long.
Boudreault, therefore, was defenceless when the 225-kilogram male seal charged.
“I wanted to back up,” he told The Canadian Press in an interview Friday. “Usually, a seal might strike, advancing to protect its territory. But this time, exceptionally, the seal charged. He didn’t stop. I slipped on the ice while turning around, he grabbed my leg and threw me over him.”
His fellow hunters weren’t able to get to him in time to stop the attack, but were able to scare off the animal, which returned to join its fellow seals.
Story continues below
Boudreault said that his experience is a reminder that while they may appear adorable in photos, seals have sharp teeth, can bite and should be respected.
The other hunters had a first aid kit and were able to provide him with treatment.
Denis Eloquin, captain of the sealing ship based out of Iles-de-la-Madeleine, communicated by radio with the Canadian Coast Guard, which arrived about two hours later to bring Boudreault by helicopter to a hospital in Charlottetown.
Eloquin said the incident took place about 4:30 p.m. and Boudreault was in hospital later that evening. His injuries required 26 stitches and he was released early Wednesday.
Boudreault has since returned to Nova Scotia. He said he intends to resume hunting when his wounds heal.
Grey seals can move faster than humans on the ground, Eloquin said, and are particularly aggressive during mating season.
But it’s the first time in 45 years that he has ever heard of a seal attacking, let alone causing such serious injuries. He said it’s also the first time he has had Fisheries and Oceans agents forbid the use of a hakapik.
“When you deprive a hunter of his tools, these are the only things you have to defend yourself,” Boudreault said. “If I’d had a hakapik, I could have defended myself, surely without even injuring the animal — just a little blow on the tip of the nose and it would have retreated.”
Eloquin said the hook is normally used to move the animal after it is killed. He said a hunter who falls into the water can also use it to get out.
Eloquin said the anomalies in the tools found by Fisheries and Oceans Canada were “insignificant.”
Boudreault said government officers lacked judgment when they confiscated the tools, adding what happened was an accident that could’ve been avoided.
A Department of Fisheries and Oceans spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
http://torontosun.com/news/weird/he...ck-leaves-defenceless-hunter-with-26-stitches
 

spaminator

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Woman poses with giraffe heart, a Valentine's Day gift for hubby
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Publishing date:Feb 23, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 2 minute read

Merelize Van Der Merwe, 32, is a hunter from South Africa. PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /SCREEN GRAB
Article content
Merelize van der Merwe, 32, is the South African woman who recently killed a giraffe and posed with its heart on Facebook.

The hunt was a gift for Valentine’s Day from the woman’s husband, hopeless romantic Gerhardt Nell.

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According to coverage in the Daily Mail, van der Merwe has been hunting since childhood and had been looking for a big black giraffe bull to kill for some years.

She was searching for an elderly giraffe; like other trophy hunters, she claims that the hunt is useful for culling older animals, even as the costs involved help fund conservation.

Both claims are false and have been repeatedly refuted by conservationists.

Van der Merwe, who owns a citrus farm, is well known as a hunter and one with an alleged 500 animal kills to her name, including leopards, elephants and other large game. It seems important that the cost of killing the giraffe (£1500) was duly reported by the British tabloids.

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Merelize Van Der Merwe poses with a giraffe heart. FACEBOOK
On her Facebook page, where she also posted a video of killing the magnificent animal, van der Merwe wrote breathlessly about how her husband had booked a trip in Sun City but quickly changed plans to accommodate the hunting trip when it came up last-minute.


“My wonderful husband knew this was my dream and fully supported me from a romantic 5 star weekend away to roughing it again in the heat and bush.

“I was literally like a little child for 2 weeks and counted down the days.

“Afterwards I was flooded with emotions as I’ve been waiting years to have this opportunity!!”

This Toronto Sun story, and the hundreds of others inspired by the hunting, not to mention the shock and outrage each potentially inspires, may turn out to be far more important to van der Merwe than the dead animal.

According to a new study published recently in the scientific journal Biology Letters, big game hunting is a status-enhancing signal.

That’s the theory from Chris Darimont, a Conservation Scientist at the University of Victoria and the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, and Brian Codding and Kristen Hawkes, both Evolutionary Anthropologists from the University of Utah.

As Dr. Darimont told Raincoast.org, “Whether they realize it or not, they are hunting for status.”

The report points out that it’s socio-economic standing that’s on display here, as there is no longer any danger or remarkable physical abilities required, “given the efficient technology contemporary trophy hunters employ.”

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

A Brit hunter poses with the baboon he killed in South Africa.
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Twisted trophy hunters celebrate the killing of an African hippo. Environmentalists say the massacre is on.
Sick plan to let trophy hunters slaughter 2,000 hippos
None
Safari guide killed by lion in Zimbabwe park that was home to Cecil

As for women trophy hunters, the scientists speculate that their behaviour, “Counter to expected gender norms (and their evolution), might allow for increased attention in an increasingly competitive social media and marketing world.”

That’s right: animal killer as influencer. “Worldwide social media creates for trophy hunters a vast audience to which to boast.”
1614102840044.png1614102917711.png
 

spaminator

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BRAUN: Hunter's bid for attention backfires
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Publishing date:Feb 24, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubble30 Comments
Merelize van der Merwe with a downed giraffe.
Merelize van der Merwe with a downed giraffe. PHOTO BY FACEBOOK /Toronto Sun
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Merelize van der Merwe has shot herself in the foot.

The big game huntress, who posted photos on Facebook to celebrate her recent killing of a giraffe, is being pilloried on social media and in the press.


For Valentine’s Day, van der Merwe’s husband financed a trophy shoot for her, fulfilling her dream of many years to add a giraffe to the list of animals she has hunted and killed.

She was particularly keen to shoot a big black bull giraffe, but first had to locate an elderly one — she ascribes to the myth that culling old animals is beneficial to a herd.

Once the animal had been located and killed, she posed proudly with its heart on social media.

The backlash was swift and immediate.

People were upset with van der Merwe’s animal killing and said so; her responses to her critics have revealed various unpleasant aspects of the young woman’s character.

Merelize van der Merwe poses with a giraffe heart. FACEBOOK
Merelize van der Merwe poses with a giraffe heart. FACEBOOK
The New York Daily News ran snippets of van der Merwe’s Facebook page, notingthat she is insensitive to issues of race and gender identity. She defends herself by saying there are far worse things than hunting:

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“You know what, screw your feelings there’s children out there being raped, human trafficking taking place child molestation happening right under your nose but I make front page across the world with a giraffe that was about to die,” she wrote.


Not entirely sure what rape and human trafficking have to do with any of this, but another post of van der Merwe’s suggests that she believes Black Lives Matter is a terrorist movement somehow connected to human trafficking and child molestation.

Another Facebook entry reads:

“While I make headlines across the globe thought I’ll take a second to have a beer and enjoy our game farm.I hope that I can at least claim some profit from all the Kleenex used this week for all the emotionally unstable people out there.”

A long Facebook screed that begins, “Oooo dear the world is triggered I totally forgot that everyone now has ‘feeling’ and gets triggered by everything!!!” goes on to list van der Merwe’s grievances in general:

“1. You can’t identify yourself as White because people will be triggered and it’s racist.

2. You can’t call a baby a boy or a girl anymore because people are triggered and now call them theybies so no gender is attached.

3. You can’t talk about history and be proud of your heritage because you’ll trigger people.

4. You can’t have woman sport anymore because transgender men compete as woman so to accommodate the 3% medals has no value and sport has become worthless.

5. When you are opinionated you are arrogant except when you are a Democrat they will lie, cheat and burn everything to the ground yet they are nominated for a peace award.

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6. You can’t hunt anymore because people will be triggered and mob attack you like a bunch of hyenas.

I’m a proud hunter and will continue to hunt I have been through hundreds of these so-called emotional attacks and still prove my point that no one will come say jack to my face!”

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Merelize Van Der Merwe, 32, is a hunter from South Africa.
Woman poses with giraffe heart, a Valentine's Day gift for hubby
Tess Talley. (Facebook)
Woman who killed giraffe in viral photo says she's 'proud to hunt'
Jacques and Martine Alboud pose with a leopard they killed on a big game safari in Tanzania in 2014.
OUTRAGE: French couple sell business after big game hunting images surface

A new psychological study of trophy hunting in the scientific journalBiology Letters theorizes that big game hunting is a status-enhancing signal. People who hunt like this are hunting for status, and believe posing for pictures with body parts of dead animals signals wealth. Posting to social media permits this boasting to the whole wide world.

One hopes van der Merwe gets all the attention she so desperately craves — enough to curb the animal killing, anyway.
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spaminator

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African Lion Safari named top of 'worst zoos' list by animal activist group
In Defense of Animals accuses African Lion Safari of "operating like an elephant-trafficking cartel"

Author of the article:Jenny Yuen
Publishing date:Mar 05, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
African Lion Safari in Hamilton has been named top of the list of "worst zoos in North America," according to a California-based animal rights group, for practices that are allegedly killing and harming elephants.
African Lion Safari in Hamilton has been named top of the list of "worst zoos in North America," according to a California-based animal rights group, for practices that are allegedly killing and harming elephants. PHOTO BY BORIS KASIMOV /IN DEFENSE OF ANIMALS
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African Lion Safari near Hamilton has been named top of the list of “worst zoos in North America,” according to a California-based animal rights group, for practices that are allegedly harming elephants.

In Defense of Animals recently released its list of the 10 most harmful zoos in 2020 and accuses African Lion Safari of “operating like an elephant-trafficking cartel” by intending to sell two mother elephants to Fort Worth Zoo in Texas, thereby separating them from their two young calves.

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“(African Lion Safari) is an international hub selling adult elephants to other zoos, which receives and sends back elephants from distant zoos for years at a time at the expense of their families for breeding, forces elephants to perform demeaning tricks and carry people around on their backs, is set in a totally unsuitable cold climate, and dominates elephants with the threat of bullhooks,” the animal advocacy group wrote on its website.

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The Fort Worth Zoo submitted a permit application to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for two female elephants — eight-year-old Nellie and 15-year-old Emily, CBC News reported. If Emily produces a calf, African Lion Safari will get $200,000, provided the baby survives for more than 60 days, said CBC News.

According to IDA, the Fort Worth Zoo offered to pay $1 million for each elephant. The deal would mean Emily would be separated from her six-year-old calf, Gigi and Nellie would be taken away from her mother Natasha, said the IDA.

However, Fort Worth Zoo spokesperson Avery Elander told the Sun on Thursday evening the “permit is no longer active. Fort Worth Zoo management reached an internal decision last year to withdraw the permit.”

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

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“In the wild, females stay with their families their entire lives,” the IDA said.

The Ontario facility has 16 Asian elephants in its care, “who have been forced to produce 21 calves,” IDA said.

“Elephant health depends on strong relationships with other elephants, but zoos are knowingly tearing apart those bonds by engaging in trafficking and ‘transfer abuse,’” said In Defense of Animals’ elephant campaign coordinator Will Anderson in a statement.

“Many zoos on this year’s 10 Worst Zoos for Elephants list repeatedly truck elephants between facilities for breeding to attract more paying visitors. Even young elephants are separated from their mothers by some of the zoos on our list. Transfer abuse is just one of the traumas inflicted on captive elephants in North America, as these intelligent and socially complex animals are denied control over their lives. The only remedy to the litany of elephant abuse exposed by our 10 Worst Zoos list is to phase out elephant exhibits and send the captives to accredited sanctuaries.”

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A spokesperson for African Lion Safari could not be reached for comment Thursday. The Toronto Sun has not verified the IDA’s allegations.

However, on its website, the drive-thru wildlife park described itself as “dedicated to the conservation of declining wildlife species.”

“African Lion Safari is extremely proud of the international reputation it has earned for excellence in the care, management and breeding of many endangered species, both birds and animals,” it said. “Our dedicated staff play an integral part in the success of African Lion Safari’s conservation and breeding initiatives. They bring their unique skills, years of experience and commitment to ensure our animals receive the best care possible.”

The zoo has remained shut during the pandemic.

jyuen@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

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Four detained in Uganda for killing and dismembering lions
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 23, 2021 • 33 minutes ago • 1 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Lions are seen in their compound at the Artis Amsterdam Royal Zoo in Amsterdam, Netherlands in this handout photo released to media on January 28, 2021.
Lions are seen in their compound at the Artis Amsterdam Royal Zoo in Amsterdam, Netherlands in this handout photo released to media on January 28, 2021. PHOTO BY ARTIS AMSTERDAM ROYAL ZOO /Handout via REUTERS
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KAMPALA — Ugandan wildlife officials have detained four men suspected of killing and dismembering lions in one of the East African country’s largest national parks, they said on Tuesday.

Six carcasses, some with severed heads and legs, were discovered in the Ishasha sector of Queen Elizabeth National Park, near the border with Democratic Republic of Congo, on Friday. The lions are believed to have been poisoned.

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The Uganda Wildlife Authority said four men had been detained.


“The suspects took the security team to a location where three heads of lions were found hidden in a tree and the fourth one was buried with 15 legs under the same tree,” UWA said in a statement.

Wildlife trafficking has been a growing problem in Uganda, with some of the worst crimes against wildlife punishable by life in prison. On Monday, the London-based animal rights charity World Animal Protection (WAP) said the killing of lions could be connected to a rising demand for lion bones in Asia.


Tiger bones and other parts were for years used in China, Vietnam and other Asian countries to produce traditional medicines, WAP said.

But following a 1993 ban in China on the use of tiger parts in traditional medicine, the demand for lion bones had increased.

In April 2018, the carcasses of eleven lions were found scattered in the same park.
 

spaminator

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Poacher who may have killed 70 tigers arrested after 20 years
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jun 01, 2021 • 37 minutes ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
In this photograph taken on March 23, 2000, a Bengal tiger rests in the brush at Ranthambhore National Park in Jaipur, India.
In this photograph taken on March 23, 2000, a Bengal tiger rests in the brush at Ranthambhore National Park in Jaipur, India. PHOTO BY AFP/GETTY IMAGES /Toronto Sun
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A notorious tiger poacher thought to have killed 70 of the big cats in the Sundarbans mangrove forest between India and Bangladesh has finally been taken down after two decades of fleeing authorities.

“Acting on a tip-off, we finally succeeded and sent him to jail,” a local police chief told the AFP news agency.


AFP says 50-year-old hunter Habib Talukder — nicknamed Tiger Habib — was arrested in Bangladesh last Saturday after eluding police for 20 years.

His hunting grounds are home to one of the world’s largest populations of endangered Bengal tigers with only a few thousand remaining in the wild.

Habib began collecting honey from wild bees in the forest but became a legend locally for avoiding arrest when he started killing tigers.

Sharankhola Station Officer Mohammad Abdul Mannan told the Dhaka Tribune that Habib was one of the most-wanted fugitives.

“He secretly entered the Sundarbans and hunted wild animals despite being banned from entering the forest long ago,” said Mannan.

“He has been carrying out these criminal activities even though there are multiple cases against him … Some powerful gangs are involved in this.”

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Regional forest conservation officer Mainuddin Khan told AFP that Habib’s arrest had brought “sighs of relief.”

“He was a big headache for us,” added Khan. “He posed a great threat to the forest’s biodiversity.”
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spaminator

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Montreal woman charged in endangered animal parts case
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jun 01, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A polar bear skull that was allegedly shipped by mail to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service special agent.
A polar bear skull that was allegedly shipped by mail to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service special agent. PHOTO BY UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK
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A Montreal woman has been charged in the United States with trafficking endangered animal parts, according to nyup.com.

Vanessa Rondeau, 26, was charged last week after allegedly attempting to cross the border into Canada from Vermont with “numerous undeclared wildlife items” that are federally protected.


Her charges carry a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Rondeau is also facing charges for allegedly selling two polar bear skulls to Ryan Bessey, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service special agent in Buffalo posing as a buyer. Authorities said the skulls — allegedly delivered by mail — sold for $780 or $720.

The Bennington Banner reported Rondeau, owner of Montreal’s The Old Cavern Boutique, allegedly attempted to cross the border Wednesday with 18 crocodile skulls and heads, seven crocodile feet, as well as a three-toed sloth.

Authorities alleged Rondeau also had 12 horseshoe crabs, 30 sea stars, 23 raccoon feet, eight African antelope horns, one human skull “with mounted butterflies,” four pufferfish and six shark jaws, according to the Banner.

A court affidavit claimed that between November 2018 and September 2019, Rondeau mailed approximately 30 parcels to the U.S., declared as, among other things, “art decoration” or “big toy.”

Rondeau made an initial court appearance in Vermont and was released on a $50,000 cash bail. She is scheduled to return to court in Buffalo on June 15.
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Lion allegedly killed by American hunter in Zimbabwe
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Aug 16, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A 2013 file photo of Cecil the lion at Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe.
A 2013 file photo of Cecil the lion at Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. PHOTO BY AP FILES /TORONTO SUN
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Cecil 2.0?

Six years after the infamous killing of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe, an unknown bow hunter who is suspected to be an American is sparking international outcry after hunting down and killing a beloved male lion named Mopane earlier this month in the same nation.


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The incident, which took place at Hwange National Park, is reported to have occurred Aug. 5.

A mystery American allegedly tracked down the 12-year-old Mopane with help from Dennis Nyakane, a guide for South African hunting outfit Chattaronga Safaris, according to online reports.

The hunter also allegedly enlisted the services of Dinguzulu Safaris ZTA HOP 0257, which is the same operator responsible for the killing of Cecil the lion in 2015.

“The perverse pleasure some people derive from killing iconic animals brought this noble lion’s life to a tragic end,” Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, told the New York Post.

“Another trophy hunter spending tens of thousands of dollars on a globe-trotting, thrill-to-kill escapade shows humanity at its worst.”

Hwange National Park. ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Hwange National Park. ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Mopane “was well-known to local tour guides and international tourists visiting the area to catch a glimpse of him,” according to a press release from the Humane Society.

The lion king also was dominant over two prides.
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