''TIME'' - definitions

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
''TIME'' - definitions
==
Can ''Time'' exist without matter ?
No.
Therefore, the right definition of ''time'' is to say: ''Gravity-time''
We have Earth ''gravity-time''.
Another planets have their own ''gravity-time''
From ''gravity-time'' is possible to create another definitions of ''time''
( atomic time-clock , biological-time, local-time, psychological-time . . . . )
=====
 

Attachments

  • D - TIME.jpg
    D - TIME.jpg
    5.4 KB · Views: 0

MHz

Time Out
Mar 16, 2007
41,030
42
48
Red Deer AB
Anything that has a beginning and an ending has 'time' between those two points. Divided into 10 parts makes visualizations easier to construct.
 

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
Anything that has a beginning and an ending has 'time' between those two points.
Divided into 10 parts makes visualizations easier to construct.
Agree,
''Time'' is artificial / mathematical measurement between a beginning and an ending.
''Time'' doesn't have ''nature''.
''Time'' is not a ''nature''.
===
 

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
Proper time
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proper_time
------
It means, SRT plays with two kinds of time:
1- ''proper time'' --- ''independent of coordinates''
In terms of Minkowski four-dimensional spacetime,
''proper time'' is Constant on the World line
2 - ''proper time interval'' between two events
on the Word line is the changes in the ''proper time''.
This ''proper time interval'' is Relative property
====
 

Attachments

  • L - C.jpg
    L - C.jpg
    52 KB · Views: 0

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
Antique sand watch ( hourglass ) and Minkowski Light cone
-----
Minkowski light cone
Light cone in 2D space plus a time dimension.
A light cone is the path that a flash of light, . . . through spacetime
(light travel from an enormous past light cone through a place
of the very tiny present to an enormous future light cone) . . .
/ look the scheme /
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_cone
#
Antique sand watch ( hourglass )
Sand in the hourglass flows from the upper vessel (place of a past)
through very tiny hole (place of the short present life) to the lower vessel
( place of the future )
#
We can turn over the hourglass and the time will flow vice versa.
Similar: the light in an absolute Minkowski spacetime can go
vice versa, according to ''The law of conservation and transformation
of energy-mass'' and the entropy principle.
-------------
 

Attachments

  • L -cone.jpg
    L -cone.jpg
    9.2 KB · Views: 0
  • antique sand watch - hourglass.jpg
    antique sand watch - hourglass.jpg
    5.5 KB · Views: 0

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
Clock's time
------
After Newton's work the world was accepted as a mechanism of clock
which showed exactly time to everybody.
After Quantum development Newton's mechanical world ''has gone crazy'',
because the clock became work very strange . . .
1 - two observers looking at the same clock saw different time . . .
2 - the clock never showed the exact time . . .
This clock enigma brought Physics to the philosophical reflections,
whose solution has not yet been found
=========
 

Jinentonix

Executive Branch Member
Sep 6, 2015
8,280
1,613
113
Olympus Mons
Antique sand watch ( hourglass ) and Minkowski Light cone
-----
Minkowski light cone
Light cone in 2D space plus a time dimension.
A light cone is the path that a flash of light, . . . through spacetime
(light travel from an enormous past light cone through a place
of the very tiny present to an enormous future light cone) . . .
/ look the scheme /
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_cone
#
Antique sand watch ( hourglass )
Sand in the hourglass flows from the upper vessel (place of a past)
through very tiny hole (place of the short present life) to the lower vessel
( place of the future )
#
We can turn over the hourglass and the time will flow vice versa.
Similar: the light in an absolute Minkowski spacetime can go
vice versa, according to ''The law of conservation and transformation
of energy-mass'' and the entropy principle.
-------------
Terrible analogy. When you turn the hourglass over the top becomes the bottom and the bottom becomes the top, thus time still flows in one direction. Secondly, if the top of the hourglass represents our past , that means time is flowing backwards. To illustrate; the sand in the past (the top) flows through the present (the tiny section in the middle) and into the future (the bottom). That doesn't work. Time can't flow from the past.


Time moves forward inexorably. You can't stop it. You can't even slow it down. And ultimately, time is utterly meaningless unless there is someone or something living to witness or experience the passage of it in their own way.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
46,061
1,279
113
Anything that has a beginning and an ending has 'time' between those two points. Divided into 10 parts makes visualizations easier to construct.

Nothing would have a beginning and end if time didn't exist, which it does.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
46,061
1,279
113
Time moves forward inexorably. You can't stop it. You can't even slow it down. And ultimately, time is utterly meaningless unless there is someone or something living to witness or experience the passage of it in their own way.

You CAN slow time down. The faster an object moves the slower time passes to it. When you are walking time is passing more slowly to you than when you are standing still.
 

Jinentonix

Executive Branch Member
Sep 6, 2015
8,280
1,613
113
Olympus Mons
You CAN slow time down. The faster an object moves the slower time passes to it. When you are walking time is passing more slowly to you than when you are standing still.
Not quite. That slow down is relative. While time slows down for you, it still passes at the same rate for everything else.


If you travel 500 LY out and back at the speed of light, you might only age a few weeks or months, but Earth/civilization is going to be MUCH different than when you left. It will be 1000 years older.


Here's where your argument kind of really breaks down. The farther away another galaxy is from us, the faster it's moving away from us. That would mean any inhabitants of that galaxy would experience time at a slower pace than we do. BUT, for the inhabitants of that galaxy looking at ours, we would be experiencing time at the slower rate.


So yes, technically you can slow time down relative to everything else around you, but that time dilation is only altering your experience of the passage of time. Outside of your "bubble" of movement, time is still a constant.
 

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
About Einstein’s SRT (1905)

1 - According to Einstein’s SR theory, time is trapped in space and vice versa.
This trapped system was called “Minkowski space-time”,
which is the foundation of the SRT and the universe.

2 - At constant speed (c) time for light is "frozen"
(time is stopped . . . rest time, zero time, infinite time, . . etc)

3 – But the "frozen time" (and everything else) becomes very unstable, that depends on Lorentz factor.
---
 

Attachments

  • Time dilation.jpg
    Time dilation.jpg
    54 KB · Views: 0

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
46,061
1,279
113
About Einstein’s SRT (1905)

1 - According to Einstein’s SR theory, time is trapped in space and vice versa.
This trapped system was called “Minkowski space-time”,
which is the foundation of the SRT and the universe.

2 - At constant speed (c) time for light is "frozen"
(time is stopped . . . rest time, zero time, infinite time, . . etc)

3 – But the "frozen time" (and everything else) becomes very unstable, that depends on Lorentz factor.
---

Yeah. At light speed there is no time. The gargantuan red supergiant star Betelgeuse is around 600 light years from Earth. That means it's so far away that it takes even light around 600 years to travel from there to here, so we see it as it was around 600 years ago - but it's so big (if it was in the centre of the Solar System its outer edges would reach the orbit of Jupiter) and so bright (126,000 times brighter than the Sun) that we can easily see it with the naked eye blazing red in Orion. But even though it takes them around 600 years to reach Earth, those light photons, if they were conscious, would perceive the journey to be instantaneous. No time at all would pass for them on their long journey from Betelgeuse to your eyes.
 

socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
951
3
18
Israel
www.worldnpa.org
At constant light speed (c) there is no time (in the so called “Minkowski space-time).
But light traveling in the infinite cosmic vacuum between billion galaxies could grow old -
“tired” (the redshift-distance relationship effect)
Tired light
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tired_light
#
The universe is not expanded.
The universe as whole is static.
Redshift tells us how the distance affects photons as they travel through the universe.
Light from a distant galaxy travels a longer path than from a nearby galaxy,
and therefore there is a difference in redshift radiation
(increase in the wavelength and decrease in frequency and energy) . . .
The relationship between the brightness of galaxies and their distance
shows that light is tired of its traveling and the light has aged during its journey.
===
 

Attachments

  • 50-Einstein.png
    50-Einstein.png
    8.9 KB · Views: 0