So what's your favourite thing to have for supper?

#juan

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Aug 30, 2005
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Re: RE: So what's your favour

Dexter Sinister said:
If you really like wine (and the Chilean is usually an excellent choice, the European stuff is over-rated and over-priced) you should make your own. I do (really like wine I mean) and I do (make my own I mean). I haven't bought a bottle of wine for 15 years. You can make wine at home for $5 a bottle as good as anything you can buy for $50 a bottle, and more routinely you can make stuff for $2-$3 a bottle that's better than 95% of what you can buy at wherever you buy your beers, wines, and spirits. It's easy, all it takes is a little care and patience. If you have enough care and patience to keep your kitchen clean, you can make wine. Check it out, there's bound to be a store called Wine Kitz or Harvest Brewing or something like that somewhere near you.

I would agree that you can make some pretty decent wines and beers at home and the more expensive wine kits are generally better than the cheapest. I've found that the ten or twelve dollar Cooper beer kits are just about as good as any, at least for my probably pedestrian tastes. I would add, that Mission Hill, Sawmill Creek, and Jackson Triggs do a fine job on their Chardonays, Summet Blancs, Merlots, and Cabernet Souvignons. As you've probably guessed, I like to buy Canadian. :wink:
 

Haggis McBagpipe

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Tell me, you homemade wine makers, is it possible to make homemade wine when you have very, very little space to do it? I know nothing about it. Can it ferment (or do whatever it does) outside, as long as it's not freezing tempertures?
 

#juan

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Hi Haggis

We've made our own wine and beer for years. For the last twenty years or so we've had an extra bathrom with it's own thermostat that let us control the temperature very well.

To answer you question about making wine outside, I wouldn't reccomend it. Even in the summer the day and night temperatures could vary by thirty degrees. I would suggest you give up two feet of your kitchen counter for the month it takes to make the wine. I would also suggest you talk to one of the wine making stores to get an idea what you need. The wine making apparatus will cost about fifty dollars. The actual wine kits will cost between fifty and eighty dollars and they make about twenty three liters of wine. That is between $1.66 and $2.66 per bottle
 

Haggis McBagpipe

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Whoa, is that ever a great price for wine! Trouble is, we are in a very small condo, it just wouldn't be workable. What about those places where you make the wine there? We have one nearby, but again, I don't know anything about it, even to know what questions to ask!
 

Jay

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Re: RE: So what's your favourite thing to have for supper?

Haggis McBagpipe said:
even to know what questions to ask!


Just ask "where do I sign up for the cheap booze"? :D
 

#juan

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What about those places where you make the wine there? We have one nearby,

You just have to give them a call. I've never used them so I can't help you much here. You will still save money but I don't know the numbers.
 

Dexter Sinister

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Re: RE: So what's your favourite thing to have for supper?

Haggis McBagpipe said:
Tell me, you homemade wine makers, is it possible to make homemade wine when you have very, very little space to do it? I know nothing about it. Can it ferment (or do whatever it does) outside, as long as it's not freezing tempertures?

I'd have answered sooner, but I had a little hardware problem with my network at home that took me a few days to track down and solve. I managed to get into CC a couple of times for a few minutes, but it was pretty unreliable.

You don't need much space to make wine at home. I've got all my equipment in the furnace room on or under a table about a meter square. If you can find a place to put a 30-liter plastic bucket and a big glass jar (called a carboy) about the the same size, plus space for 30 bottles of wine, you can do it. You also need to be physically strong enough to haul around a bucket that size full of water.

I wouldn't recommend doing it outside. The fermentation is very temperature dependent. It'd probably work, but if the temperature's much below about 20°C it'll take a LONG time, and temperature variations can do great harm to the quality of the finished product. Some of the stores that sell wine and beer making kits and supplies also provide space in the back of the shop where customers can keep their stuff, and there are clubs in some places that do the same, that the people at the shop could put you onto. It's a whole little subculture in some places. I have a sister-in-law in Langley who does it that way.

You don't need to know what questions to ask, really. I've never been in a wine/beer kit shop that didn't have very friendly, helpful people in it (and there's a mind-bogglingly hot mature woman at the one I frequent; that oughta get Zoofer started...) They'll tell you everything you need to know, and they're always happy to get a new customer.
 

Haggis McBagpipe

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Hey, thanks for the information, Dex!

As for the strength to haul around a bucket that size full of water, well, this gritty soul can wield a whip twice as heavy, and I do, on a regular basis, in the Torture Rooms.

Oh, and as for Zoofer, now you've done it, he'll be moving into your neighbourhood in a flash.

. . . Actually, speaking of 'flash', he might do that too. :lol: :lol:
 

#juan

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Well, I like a pot roast.

You need a pot roast that just barely fits in your pot. I suggest a six pound cross rib. Brown the roast on all sides, and stuff it into your crock pot. Around the sides squeeze in a few cloves of garlic, an onion, quartered, a couple bay leaves, as well as four medium carrots. Now pour in a can of Cambell's beef broth and half a can of water. Cover and turn pot to low setting. Come back in eight hours. Remove roast, carrots, discard bay leaves, onions, and garlic. Thicken gravy with flour and water.

This roast will melt in your mouth. Serve with the carrots, mashed potatoes or hot buttered noodles, brocolli, a nice salad, and a bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon.
 

General James Wolfe

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Oct 30, 2006
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My favourite thing for dinner is


Roast Beef
Roast Potatoes
Yorkshire Pudding

Their is nothing like having a good old fashoined Roat Beef, Roast Potatoes and Yorkshire Pudding for dinner. My favourite sausce for Roat Beef, Roast Potatoes and Yorkshire Pudding is ketchup. I like to have my Roast Beef done meduim rare.


BEEF IS MY FAVOURITE MEAT


I have Roast Beef, Roast Potatoes and Yorkshire Pudding on Sunday Lunch and Sunday Dinner every week.