So what's your favourite thing to have for supper?

Dexter Sinister

Unspecified Specialist
Oct 1, 2004
9,756
272
83
Regina, SK
The first thing I saw this morning at the top of my ISP's home page was this:

Regina, SK Updated: Fri Feb 17 07:55:00 CST 2006
Current Conditions: A few clouds
Temperature: -30°C, Barometric Pressure: 104.7kPa
Wind: 26 km/h W, Relative Humidity: 61%
Wind Chill/Humidex: -45°C, Dewpoint: -35°C

Note the large negative numbers for temperature and wind chill. Who was it who decided Saskatchewan was habitable year round?

Being a sensible person, and retired, I decided the most sensible response to that would be to stay in the house all day. So I did. But my wife and daughter, who are not retired (or sensible, if you ask me, but nobody ever does) had to go out in that horrible chill, so I thought a good thing to do would be to prepare a supper of comfort food. So I did that too.

When they got back home around 5:30 p.m., they were greeted by the smell of Greek style potatoes (quarter them, rub in a little lemon juice and oregano, bake at 325 in a covered pan until you like their texture), sirloin steak simmering on top of the stove in a mixture of Dexter's Special Marinade (to DIE for) and its own juices, and on the elegantly set table was a big bowl of everbody's favourite salad, which consists of romaine lettuce, diced tomato, red onion, red and green peppers, and cucumber, tossed with olive oil, oregano, and balsamic vinegar, and some crumbled Stilton blue cheese.

That seems to be the favourite thing to have for supper here at Chateau Sinister, except in the summer, when everything's the same except I do the steak and potatoes on the barbecue, which is even better.

What is it at your house?
 

FiveParadox

Governor General
Dec 20, 2005
5,875
43
48
Vancouver, BC
Comfort Food

Ah, the favourite meal? An extremely hard decision — I am not sure if I have adopted one yet (recently turned vegetarian). As of now, the thing I have the most by choice is probably the thing that is my favourite, so I would deem it prudent to just go ahead with that; dal turka and nan. I don't even care if I have anything with it, lol. Love the stuff.
 

Cosmo

House Member
Jul 10, 2004
3,725
22
38
Victoria, BC
Dexter Sinister said:
Being a sensible person, and retired,
Dunno, Dexter ... thought all us "sensible" people lived here in Aloha North on Vancouver Island! Even with the rain this winter, I never had the chance to break out my winter (read fur) coat!!

Ok ... you tease us with your special "to die for" marinade then don't give us the recipe! Or better yet ... come live with us till Mrs. Dexter retires and you can cook and be away from those nasty eastern winters! ;)

PS ... moved this to the food topic
 

Dexter Sinister

Unspecified Specialist
Oct 1, 2004
9,756
272
83
Regina, SK
Cosmo said:
Ok ... you tease us with your special "to die for" marinade then don't give us the recipe!

Well, you realize, of course, that I had to give someone a reason to respond... :wink:

Can't really give you a recipe in the usual way, it exists only in my head and it's a little different every time. The basic ingredient, and its dominant flavour, is Worcestershire sauce, one of the most under-appreciated condiments in the world in my not very humble opinion. It also involves varying amounts of HP sauce, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, sometimes a little soya sauce, lemon juice, leftover wine or the heel of a bottle of harder stuff if there's any lying around, and so forth. Hard to go wrong, really, unless you do something dumb like dumping a liter of Johnny Walker Red into it. Might as well use kerosene as that stuff.

Precisely what I throw together depends on my mood, the cut of meat involved, how I plan to cook it, and, to some extent, what's standing around in the kitchen. Cheaper (i.e. tougher) cuts, for instance, get a more acidic marinade and soak in it longer. You can turn a chewy old brisket into filet-level tenderness that way. If I'm going to be barbecuing, I use much less olive oil or omit it entirely, 'cause it catches fire too easily. And so forth.

Willingness to experiment and blithe self assurance that it'll work, that's all you really need.
 

ladyjen345

New Member
Feb 20, 2006
3
0
1
My favourite supper is porridge or cornflakes! I spent years cooking meals everynight for my family and now I live alone and can damn well eat what I want, when I want!

Seriously, I love chicken breasts covered in salsa and fresh garlic with a little chedder cheese sprinkled on top and baked. Served with steamed asparagus and wild rice. Sometimes I make a hollandais sauce for the asparagus.
 

zoofer

Council Member
Dec 31, 2005
1,274
2
38
Porridge for two! Sigh. :)
Cheese burger specials are over. :cry:

Here are some Swedish dishes.

http://www.recipedeluxe.com/

That Swedish dish Jessi moved to Toronto so the site has not been updated much.

Neither has her noo email addy I might add! :twisted: :evil:
 

Jay

Executive Branch Member
Jan 7, 2005
8,366
3
38
I make the best spaghetti sauce this side of the ocean, and my favorite supper time cuisine is spaghetti (or some other form of pasta.).
 

Sassylassie

House Member
Jan 31, 2006
2,976
7
38
Ha, this is an easy question. POTATOE CHIPS, POTATOE CHIPS-sea salt and vinagar. For the other half Seafood pasta in a cream and garlic sauce, garden salad with chunks of chilled lobster tossed with fresh lemon juice and olive oil. A dry white wine. Did I mention Potatoe chips.
 

missile

House Member
Dec 1, 2004
4,846
17
38
Saint John N.B.
Boiled Dinner AKA Corned Beef without Cabbage..carrots,turnips and potatoes boiled along with the corned beef[it has to be corned beef brisket tho!]
 

Dexter Sinister

Unspecified Specialist
Oct 1, 2004
9,756
272
83
Regina, SK
Re: RE: So what's your favour

If you really like wine (and the Chilean is usually an excellent choice, the European stuff is over-rated and over-priced) you should make your own. I do (really like wine I mean) and I do (make my own I mean). I haven't bought a bottle of wine for 15 years. You can make wine at home for $5 a bottle as good as anything you can buy for $50 a bottle, and more routinely you can make stuff for $2-$3 a bottle that's better than 95% of what you can buy at wherever you buy your beers, wines, and spirits. It's easy, all it takes is a little care and patience. If you have enough care and patience to keep your kitchen clean, you can make wine. Check it out, there's bound to be a store called Wine Kitz or Harvest Brewing or something like that somewhere near you.
 

Laika

Electoral Member
Apr 22, 2005
225
0
16
Where The Wild Things Are
RE: So what's your favour

I've thought about making wine, but I live in an apartment and I was under the impression that you really need some room for tubs and storge space for the jugs. It's just not practical in our current living space.

I'm not really much of a drinker anyway, although I do enjoy a glass of wine now and then; it would take us years to drink an entire batch of home made wine. But, maybe someday when we buy our own house and have room for big messy projects. :)
 

cortez

Council Member
Feb 22, 2006
1,260
0
36
Chocolate chicken. This is without a doubt the most scrumpdidliumptious recipe in the entire world- there are many recipes on the internet- pick any one and try it. Yum Yum....
 

zoofer

Council Member
Dec 31, 2005
1,274
2
38
When I need a break from my regular greasy spoon restaurant or when I need to impress my date I usually borrow the pink kilt and duck in here.