Scolari looks set to become next England coach.

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The FA are currently interviewing several managers in their hunt for the next England manager, who will take over from Sven Goran Eriksson after the World Cup. Several British managers, such as Sam Allardyce, Steve McClaren, Alan Curbishley and Martin O'Neill are being interviewed, as well as the Brazillian Luis Felipe Scolari.

Scolari is now seen as the man who will get the job. He was manager of Brazil when they won the 2002 World Cup, and manager of Portugal when they lost against Greece in the Final of Euro 2004 - on both occasions, Scolari's team beat England in the Quarter Finals.

Scolari is expected to demand an annual salary of £3 million. The England manager is the highest paid manager in world football, club or country.


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27 April 2006

ENGLAND MANAGER'S JOB - IT'S YOURS SCOLARI

EXCLUSIVE Barwick in Lisbon for talks with Big Phil

By Oliver Holt, Chief Sports Writer


"Phil" Scolari.

THE FA last night took a giant step closer to making Luis Felipe Scolari the new England manager.

Chief executive Brian Barwick acted to end the embarrassing stalemate over the appointment by flying to Lisbon for face-to-face talks with the Portugal manager.

And crucially, the meeting took place with the permission of the Portuguese Football Federation.

The breakthrough could open the way for an imminent announcement that Scolari will succeed Sven Goran Eriksson after the World Cup. Until yesterday's meeting, it had seemed Scolari's refusal to enter into open talks with the FA would wreck any deal, even though he had been championed by powerbroker David Dein.

The Brazilian previously insisted he would not be distracted from Portugal's World Cup campaign by agreeing to join England after the tournament.

But Barwick's success in forcing a meeting suggests the Portuguese have relented and allowed Scolari to begin the process of working out a deal to be England boss.

All that remains is for the FA to agree a wage package for the man who guided Brazil to World Cup glory in 2002.


Scolari is expected to demand an annual salary of least £3million (that's just over £57,600 per WEEK or £250,000 per month).

mirror.co.uk
 

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Scolari 'accepts England job'

Reports suggest a deal is already done after FA confirms talks with Brazilian

Georgina Turner and agencies
Thursday April 27, 2006

Luiz Felipe Scolari has agreed to become the next England manager, according to reports this afternoon. London's Evening Standard claims the Brazilian will be unveiled as Sven-Goran Eriksson's replacement later this week or early next week. The 57-year-old, who is currently preparing to lead Portugal at the World Cup finals, will reportedly be paid £3m per year, somewhat less than Eriksson.

FA chief executive Brian Barwick has confirmed that he and lawyer Simon Johnson met Scolari in Lisbon but refused to be drawn on the outcome of their talks. "I think it is well evidenced now that we were in Lisbon, speaking to [Luiz] Felipe Scolari, as part of the process of recruiting the next coach and that process continues," Barwick said as he arrived back in England earlier today.

It is believed that FA chairman Geoff Thompson was granted permission to speak to Scolari by his counterpart at the Portuguese FA, Gilberto Madail. But Portugal team spokesman Afonso Mello made it clear today that he was not aware of any meeting. "He [Scolari] has not had any contacts or any meetings with anybody," said Mello. "He has given his word that he won't speak to anyone about his future until after the World Cup. That's the pledge he has made and he's sticking to it."

Mello also revealed he did not know whether Madail had met with anybody from the English FA. "I doubt it, though," he added, "because Scolari and Madail have an agreement that the issue is off the table until the end of the World Cup." Scolari himself was later approached by reporters while leaving a restaurant in Lisbon, but did not want to discuss whether he had held talks with the FA, saying only: "I'm working. I'm doing my job."

The likely appointment of Scolari has not gone down well with the League Managers' Association. "I think it would be a popular decision, but I don't think in the long term it's a good decision for what's best for England and English football," said chairman Howard Wilkinson, who has twice been caretaker manager for England. "I think in the long term it sends out the wrong message from the Football Association to English coaches and the ramifications will be seen in the years ahead."

guardian.co.uk