Omnibus Russia Ukraine crisis

spaminator

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A Nazi being cheered in the House of Commons a dark day

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Sep 24, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read

A full apology was certainly warranted for celebrating a Second World War Nazi in the House of Commons.


And it finally came on Sunday.


“The independent Speaker of the House has apologized and accepted full responsibility for issuing the invitation and for the recognition in Parliament. This was the right thing to do,” said a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office.

“No advance notice was provided to the Prime Minister’s Office, nor the Ukrainian delegation, about the invitation or the recognition.”

Still, last Friday may go down in history as one of the worst blunders in the history of the House of Commons.

That was the day that a former soldier who fought with a Ukrainian military branch of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi party not only was introduced in a session of Canada’s Parliament during a visit by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, but received a standing ovation from MPs.


Speaker of the House Anthony Rota told the House of Commons, “We have here in chamber, today, a Ukrainian Canadian veteran from the Second World War who fought for Ukrainian independence against the Russians and continues to support the troops today even at his age of 98.”



Everybody in the commons rose to their feet in applause as Rota spoke.

“His name is Jaroslav Hunka, I am very proud to say he is from North Bay and my riding of Nipissing—Timiskaming. He is a Ukrainian hero, a Canadian hero and we thank him for all his service.”

Historians were confused by how a person could be fighting against the Russians when the then-Soviet army was aligned with the Allied forces, including Canada, against Hitler’s Germany which had occupied Ukraine. They quickly learned that Hunka had served with the volunteer First Ukrainian Division during the war and came to Canada after that.



That division was also known as the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS — referred to as the SS Galichina — and considered part of the Germany’s Nazi war machine.

“Parliament owes an apology to all Canadians for this outrage, and a detailed explanation as to how this could possibly have taken place at the centre of Canadian democracy,” said B’Nai Brith Canada CEO Michael Mostyn.

It’s as ugly as ugly can get.

“This is an appalling error in judgement on the part of (Prime Minister) Justin Trudeau, whose personal protocol office is responsible for arranging and vetting all guests and programming for state visits of this kind,” said a statement from Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, who called on Trudeau to apologize.

“No parliamentarians (other than Justin Trudeau) had the opportunity to vet this individual’s past before he was introduced and honoured on the floor of the House of Commons. Without warning or context, it was impossible for any parliamentarian in the room (other than Mr. Trudeau) to know of this dark past,” he added in a statement.


The PMO distanced itself from the controversy, insisting that the Speaker’s Office is independent of Trudeau and that in addition to issuing the invitation, it had an allotment of seats for guests.

But no matter who issued the invitation, the damage is done.

“We are deeply troubled and disturbed that a Ukrainian veteran of the infamous 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the Nazi SS – which actively participated in the genocide of Jews – was celebrated with a standing ovation in the Canadian Parliament,” the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) said in a posting on X.

Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre added it was “deeply disturbed (by) the Canadian Parliament’s recognition of a Ukrainian veteran who served in a Nazi military unit during the Second World War implicated in the mass murder of Jews and others” and “outraged that parliamentarians in the House of Commons gave a standing ovation to the former soldier.”


They also said, “an apology is owed to every Holocaust survivor and veteran of the Second World War who fought the Nazis, and an explanation must be provided as to how this individual entered the hallowed halls of Canadian Parliament and received recognition from the Speaker of the House and a standing ovation.”

There is no question an apology is necessary.

The fallout from this has been reported around the world, including in Russia, where it is being used to show how Nazi’s are being supported by Canada, which has provided arms to Ukraine in its fight against Russia.

In addition to everything else is the shocking lack of understanding about history inside Canada’s political leadership. That this could happen has shaken the confidence people have in the competence of the Liberal government, the House’s elected speaker and the opposition, too, as they were all on their feet clapping.

This will be a mistake not soon forgotten.
 

spaminator

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A Nazi being cheered in the House of Commons a dark day

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Sep 24, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read

A full apology was certainly warranted for celebrating a Second World War Nazi in the House of Commons.


And it finally came on Sunday.


“The independent Speaker of the House has apologized and accepted full responsibility for issuing the invitation and for the recognition in Parliament. This was the right thing to do,” said a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office.

“No advance notice was provided to the Prime Minister’s Office, nor the Ukrainian delegation, about the invitation or the recognition.”

Still, last Friday may go down in history as one of the worst blunders in the history of the House of Commons.

That was the day that a former soldier who fought with a Ukrainian military branch of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi party not only was introduced in a session of Canada’s Parliament during a visit by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, but received a standing ovation from MPs.


Speaker of the House Anthony Rota told the House of Commons, “We have here in chamber, today, a Ukrainian Canadian veteran from the Second World War who fought for Ukrainian independence against the Russians and continues to support the troops today even at his age of 98.”



Everybody in the commons rose to their feet in applause as Rota spoke.

“His name is Jaroslav Hunka, I am very proud to say he is from North Bay and my riding of Nipissing—Timiskaming. He is a Ukrainian hero, a Canadian hero and we thank him for all his service.”

Historians were confused by how a person could be fighting against the Russians when the then-Soviet army was aligned with the Allied forces, including Canada, against Hitler’s Germany which had occupied Ukraine. They quickly learned that Hunka had served with the volunteer First Ukrainian Division during the war and came to Canada after that.



That division was also known as the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS — referred to as the SS Galichina — and considered part of the Germany’s Nazi war machine.

“Parliament owes an apology to all Canadians for this outrage, and a detailed explanation as to how this could possibly have taken place at the centre of Canadian democracy,” said B’Nai Brith Canada CEO Michael Mostyn.

It’s as ugly as ugly can get.

“This is an appalling error in judgement on the part of (Prime Minister) Justin Trudeau, whose personal protocol office is responsible for arranging and vetting all guests and programming for state visits of this kind,” said a statement from Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, who called on Trudeau to apologize.

“No parliamentarians (other than Justin Trudeau) had the opportunity to vet this individual’s past before he was introduced and honoured on the floor of the House of Commons. Without warning or context, it was impossible for any parliamentarian in the room (other than Mr. Trudeau) to know of this dark past,” he added in a statement.


The PMO distanced itself from the controversy, insisting that the Speaker’s Office is independent of Trudeau and that in addition to issuing the invitation, it had an allotment of seats for guests.

But no matter who issued the invitation, the damage is done.

“We are deeply troubled and disturbed that a Ukrainian veteran of the infamous 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the Nazi SS – which actively participated in the genocide of Jews – was celebrated with a standing ovation in the Canadian Parliament,” the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) said in a posting on X.

Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre added it was “deeply disturbed (by) the Canadian Parliament’s recognition of a Ukrainian veteran who served in a Nazi military unit during the Second World War implicated in the mass murder of Jews and others” and “outraged that parliamentarians in the House of Commons gave a standing ovation to the former soldier.”


They also said, “an apology is owed to every Holocaust survivor and veteran of the Second World War who fought the Nazis, and an explanation must be provided as to how this individual entered the hallowed halls of Canadian Parliament and received recognition from the Speaker of the House and a standing ovation.”

There is no question an apology is necessary.

The fallout from this has been reported around the world, including in Russia, where it is being used to show how Nazi’s are being supported by Canada, which has provided arms to Ukraine in its fight against Russia.

In addition to everything else is the shocking lack of understanding about history inside Canada’s political leadership. That this could happen has shaken the confidence people have in the competence of the Liberal government, the House’s elected speaker and the opposition, too, as they were all on their feet clapping.

This will be a mistake not soon forgotten.
did nazi that coming. ;)
 

spaminator

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Another tribute to WWII Ukrainian Nazi unit in Oakville

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Sep 25, 2023 • Last updated 5 hours ago • 3 minute read
After fully investigating Jaroslav Hunka's Nazi war record, Canada should tear down the cenotaph commemorating his former SS unit.
A monument commemerating the 14th Waffen SS is pictured in St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Cemetery in Oakville. (Joe Warmington, Toronto Sun)
The first thing Canada should do after fully investigating Jaroslav Hunka’s Nazi war record is tear down the cenotaph commemorating his former SS unit.


You read it right.


Long before Friday’s controversy in which the House of Commons honoured a 98-year-old who fought in a volunteer unit that was part of the Nazi war machine in Ukraine during the Second World War, a giant statue marking those who served in that division — the 14th Waffen SS — was erected in Canada.

It sits inside the St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Cemetery in Oakville, between Canadian and Ukrainian flags.


While Canada’s left embarks on its vengeful binge to erase the country’s history by tearing down or boarding up statues of Father of Confederation Sir John A. Macdonald, Queen Victoria, James McGill and Egerton Ryerson — and is set to spend millions to change the name of Dundas St. — a member of this Nazi unit was cheered in Parliament and a statue honouring the division stands tall.


If it is not removed immediately, every other statue honouring a part of Canadian history should be restored immediately.

It won’t be hard to do at Queen’s Park. All they need to do is take down the boards that have encased the bronze statue of Macdonald for three years.

Instead, we get to celebrate the evil Nazis.

It’s a disgrace and a slap in the face to Jewish Canadians commemorating Yom Kippur. It’s a spit on the grave of every Canadian veteran.

But we didn’t get an apology from the federal government. While calling the incident embarrassing, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau passed off the blame to Speaker of the House Anthony Rota, while asking Canadians to be aware of Russian propaganda and misinformation.


It’s Liberal propaganda and misinformation. And spin. They are experts at it.

The liberal left for years has gotten away with calling anybody who refused to bow to their feet a Nazi.


Now that they, the Liberal/NDP alliance government, have been caught red-handed, joining in giving a standing ovation to a man who fought with the Nazi’s during the Second World War.

Conservative MPs Melissa Lantsman or a Leslyn Lewis did not get apologies for deplorable and false suggestions they were supporting Nazi ideology, nor did their leader, Pierre Poilievre, for all the times he’s been called a fascist.

Tamara Lich and Chris Barber are on trial for their alleged part of the Freedom Convoy for mischief and face 10 years in prison, if convicted.


Is bringing a Nazi into Parliament mischief? Or just one of those things that no Liberal would have had let Conservative Stephen Harper get away with when he was prime minister.

But they sure are forgiving of Trudeau who wore Blackface while suggesting others are racist, and the Liberal government that oversaw someone who served under Hitler afforded hero status in Canada’s parliamentary chamber.


Not anybody else. It’s them.

It should mean that the liberal left no longer have the moral ground to hurl the insult of “Nazi” at their opponents. Instead, they want to have the record in the House stricken and for no one to dare to say another word about this.

Like the government itself, Rota refuses to do the right thing and resign. Instead, he is clinging to power after making what did appear to be a heartfelt apology.

But no one believes the decision to invite Hunka to Friday’s speech to Parliament by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy was all Rota’s doing. Fewer believe Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, at least, didn’t understand that if this man was fighting against the Russians, he was fighting against the Allied side for Germany and the Nazi party.



Instead of disavowing these evil murderers who orchestrated the Holocaust and exterminated millions of innocent people, Canada is a place known for giving them a standing ovation and even has a giant memorial to their memory.

This does not mean anybody should vandalize or remove the statue in Oakville.

That has happened before when people wrote “Nazi war memorial” on it. Halton Regional Police Chief Tanner in 2020 rightly tweeted his amazement that it was even there.

It should not be.

But it will take the government to push for that to happen, just like they do for Macdonald statues. But if it stays, it’s time for every other statue to go back up.
1695778980659.png
 

spaminator

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Canada needs to denounce Ukrainian Nazi unit, not honour it, says prof who uncovered veteran's links
Poland has joined with Jewish groups in demanding an apology from the Canadian government

Author of the article:David Pugliese • Ottawa Citizen
Published Sep 25, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

The Canadian government needs to denounce a Ukrainian Nazi unit, not honour its members in the House of Commons, says a University of Ottawa professor who helped uncover the past of a man who served in the SS in the Second World War.


Poland has joined with Jewish groups in demanding an apology from the Canadian government after MPs gave a rousing standing ovation and honoured a Ukrainian soldier who fought for one of the Nazi’s notorious SS divisions.

The honours on Friday for Yaroslav Hunka of North Bay, Ont., have sparked anger on social media and calls for the resignation of House of Commons speaker Anthony Rota.

Hunka fought with the Waffen-SS Galicia Division, also known as the SS 14th Waffen Division and sometimes referred to as the First Ukrainian Division — a voluntary unit that was under the command of the Nazis.

His service was highlighted by Rota during a visit to parliament by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. “He is a Ukrainian hero, a Canadian hero, and we thank him for all his service,” Rota said in introducing Hunka.


Rota issued an apology Sunday, stating he alone is to blame for his remarks and the harm caused the Jewish community. He did not name Hunka in his statement.

But Ivan Katchanovski, a Ukrainian-Canadian professor at the University of Ottawa who is at the centre of uncovering Hunka’s past, said it’s time for Canada to send a clear message denouncing the unit. “The Canadian government should directly condemn SS Galicia, not honour it,” said Katchanovski, a specialist in Ukrainian politics. “It is unbelievable this happened in the first place.”

Details about Hunka’s service are on a website honouring the division, including photos of the North Bay man in his Nazi uniform. Katchanovski’s tweets about Hunka, with the photos, have been viewed on X, formerly known as Twitter, more than three million times. U.S., British, Polish and Australian media outlets have all reported on the controversy.


Hunka has not commented on the controversy.

Poland and Jewish groups have denounced the Waffen-SS Galicia Division for its role in killing civilians and involvement in massacres during the war. The division was also used by the Nazis to crush a national uprising in Slovakia, again prompting allegations of war crimes.

Witold Dzielski, Poland’s Ambassador to Canada, has called for Canada to formally apologize for honouring Hunka.

Katchanovski said MPs should have realized what was happening as soon as Rota introduced Hunka as a “Ukrainian Canadian war veteran from the Second World War who fought for Ukrainian independence against the Russians.”

The Russians had allied with Canada, the U.S., Britain and other nations to fight against the Nazis during the war.


The Canadian government has not issued an apology but has instead pointed to Rota’s statement accepting blame.

The division was formed in 1943 when Nazi Germany needed to shore up its forces as allied troops, including those from the U.S., Canada, Britain and Russia, started to gain the upper hand and turn the tide of the war.

During its recruiting drive to entice Ukrainians into the ranks of the SS, the Nazis highlighted the need to destroy what they claimed was the Jewish-controlled Soviet forces. One recruiting poster featured an SS soldier fighting a caricature who had the Star of David on their arm.

While 80,000 Ukrainians volunteered for service for the SS Division, and some 12,000 were selected, millions more Ukrainians fought for the Russian Army against the Nazis.


After the war, the International Military Tribunal declared the SS to be a criminal organization. That included the units of the Waffen SS such as the Galicia division.

In the 1980s, an examination of war criminals in Canada found there were 600 former members of SS Galicia Division still living in Canada. Justice Jules Deschenes, who headed the commission, concluded that membership in the division did not itself constitute a war crime.

One part of the Deschenes report, however, did raise concerns that some Ukrainians who participated in the Holocaust and other war crimes did find their way into the division. At least 600 pages of Deschenes’ report are still classified secret.

Some nationalist Ukrainian-Canadians see the 14th Waffen Division as heroes for their battles against Russian forces. Monuments honouring the Ukrainian SS troops have been erected in Oakville and Edmonton. B’nai Brith Canada and the Canadian Polish Congress have jointly called for the removal of the monuments.
 

spaminator

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Forget the Commons, how did Nazi end up in Canada in first place?
Author of the article:Warren Kinsella
Published Sep 25, 2023 • Last updated 6 hours ago • 3 minute read

They weren’t an army division. They were actually a criminal organization.


That was what the Nuremberg Trials called the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS: Criminals, not soldiers, who found themself in the spotlight on Parliament Hill on Friday when former 14th Waffen member Yaroslav Hunka was invited to the House of Commons by Speaker Anthony Rota and received a standing ovation as “a Ukrainian and a Canadian hero” who fought for “Ukrainian independence against the Russians.”


Of course, there’s much more to the SS division’s sordid past than that. The 14th Waffen Grenadier Division murdered many, many Jews and Polish civilians. For this, they were applauded by Heinrich Himmler, who was the leader of the Nazi Party and the architect of the Holocaust.


In a speech, Himmler said of the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division: “Your homeland has become so much more beautiful since you have lost — on our initiative, I must say — those residents who were so often a dirty blemish on Galicia’s good name, namely the Jews … I know that if I ordered you to liquidate the Poles … I would be giving you permission to do what you are eager to do anyway.”


Which they were. Which they did. For their homeland, which was Ukraine.

One such atrocity took place at the Polish village of Huta Pieniacka. According to those who were there, civilians were locked in barns, which were then set on fire. Those who tried to escape were killed.

On another occasion in the spring of 1944, 2,000 women and children had sought refuge in a monastery in the Polish village of Pidkamin, which is now part of Ukraine. The SS Grenadiers captured it and murdered hundreds.

Canada’s Deschenes Commission later concluded that it was unfair to call everyone in the 14th Division a war criminal. But the fact is that the commission never travelled to Europe to interview its victims.




The Nuremberg prosecutors who did found that the Grenadiers were led by men who had participated in the mass murder of Jews and civilians. And were indeed homicidal maniacs.

As Esprit de Corps magazine concluded: “Over the decades, as Holocaust historians publish more details about the atrocities of those who served in the SS Galicia Division, it has become clear to critics that the Deschenes commission was simply a whitewash of a military unit that subscribed to and served the ideology of Adolf Hitler and SS leader Heinrich Himmler.”

And one of them — one of the Nazis — was praised in the House of Commons this week. Our Church of Government defiled by the presence of a man who subscribed to the ideology of murder, Naziism.

The fact that he was there was bad enough. But this writer had a different question: What the hell was he doing in Canada in the first place?

The answer: He came here with 2,000 other Nazis. And the Canadian government welcomed them with open arms, too.

Flight Lt. Bohdan Panchuk was their sponsor. Writes historian and Postmedia journalist David Pugliese: “Panchuk was able to get members of the 14th Waffen SS Division Galicia into Canada by lying about their past.



Members of the unit had surrendered to Allied forces and were being held in a camp in Italy. In an attempt to hide the SS connection, the unit had changed its name in the last few days of the war to the First Division Ukrainian National Army. ”

To get them into Canada, Panchuk depicted them as anti-Soviet fighters. If Canadian officials had bothered to probe deeper, they would’ve found the truth. In fact, most of the men had SS tattoos under their left arms.

Ukrainians who lived in Canada knew who they were. They raised the alarm. But nobody listened to them. The 2,000 Nazis thereafter started to arrive throughout the 1950s and got to work whitewashing their past.

Which brings us to now. And the main question.

The main question is not how this Nazi came to be in the House of Commons. By now, we all know he was invited there by the moron who resigned Tuesday as the Speaker of the House of Commons amid calls that he step down.

No, the more important question is this: How did this Nazi get to Canada in the first place — and why is he still here?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Canada needs to denounce Ukrainian Nazi unit, not honour it, says prof who uncovered veteran's links
Poland has joined with Jewish groups in demanding an apology from the Canadian government

Author of the article:David Pugliese • Ottawa Citizen
Published Sep 25, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

The Canadian government needs to denounce a Ukrainian Nazi unit, not honour its members in the House of Commons, says a University of Ottawa professor who helped uncover the past of a man who served in the SS in the Second World War.


Poland has joined with Jewish groups in demanding an apology from the Canadian government after MPs gave a rousing standing ovation and honoured a Ukrainian soldier who fought for one of the Nazi’s notorious SS divisions.

The honours on Friday for Yaroslav Hunka of North Bay, Ont., have sparked anger on social media and calls for the resignation of House of Commons speaker Anthony Rota.

Hunka fought with the Waffen-SS Galicia Division, also known as the SS 14th Waffen Division and sometimes referred to as the First Ukrainian Division — a voluntary unit that was under the command of the Nazis.

His service was highlighted by Rota during a visit to parliament by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. “He is a Ukrainian hero, a Canadian hero, and we thank him for all his service,” Rota said in introducing Hunka.


Rota issued an apology Sunday, stating he alone is to blame for his remarks and the harm caused the Jewish community. He did not name Hunka in his statement.

But Ivan Katchanovski, a Ukrainian-Canadian professor at the University of Ottawa who is at the centre of uncovering Hunka’s past, said it’s time for Canada to send a clear message denouncing the unit. “The Canadian government should directly condemn SS Galicia, not honour it,” said Katchanovski, a specialist in Ukrainian politics. “It is unbelievable this happened in the first place.”

Details about Hunka’s service are on a website honouring the division, including photos of the North Bay man in his Nazi uniform. Katchanovski’s tweets about Hunka, with the photos, have been viewed on X, formerly known as Twitter, more than three million times. U.S., British, Polish and Australian media outlets have all reported on the controversy.


Hunka has not commented on the controversy.

Poland and Jewish groups have denounced the Waffen-SS Galicia Division for its role in killing civilians and involvement in massacres during the war. The division was also used by the Nazis to crush a national uprising in Slovakia, again prompting allegations of war crimes.

Witold Dzielski, Poland’s Ambassador to Canada, has called for Canada to formally apologize for honouring Hunka.

Katchanovski said MPs should have realized what was happening as soon as Rota introduced Hunka as a “Ukrainian Canadian war veteran from the Second World War who fought for Ukrainian independence against the Russians.”

The Russians had allied with Canada, the U.S., Britain and other nations to fight against the Nazis during the war.


The Canadian government has not issued an apology but has instead pointed to Rota’s statement accepting blame.

The division was formed in 1943 when Nazi Germany needed to shore up its forces as allied troops, including those from the U.S., Canada, Britain and Russia, started to gain the upper hand and turn the tide of the war.

During its recruiting drive to entice Ukrainians into the ranks of the SS, the Nazis highlighted the need to destroy what they claimed was the Jewish-controlled Soviet forces. One recruiting poster featured an SS soldier fighting a caricature who had the Star of David on their arm.

While 80,000 Ukrainians volunteered for service for the SS Division, and some 12,000 were selected, millions more Ukrainians fought for the Russian Army against the Nazis.


After the war, the International Military Tribunal declared the SS to be a criminal organization. That included the units of the Waffen SS such as the Galicia division.

In the 1980s, an examination of war criminals in Canada found there were 600 former members of SS Galicia Division still living in Canada. Justice Jules Deschenes, who headed the commission, concluded that membership in the division did not itself constitute a war crime.

One part of the Deschenes report, however, did raise concerns that some Ukrainians who participated in the Holocaust and other war crimes did find their way into the division. At least 600 pages of Deschenes’ report are still classified secret.

Some nationalist Ukrainian-Canadians see the 14th Waffen Division as heroes for their battles against Russian forces. Monuments honouring the Ukrainian SS troops have been erected in Oakville and Edmonton. B’nai Brith Canada and the Canadian Polish Congress have jointly called for the removal of the monuments.
Its more complex that how its stated. They were fighting for different reasons and different ideologies than the Germans.
 

spaminator

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Trudeau Liberals embarrass Canada and fuel Russian propaganda
Kremlin on the offensive after soldier who fought for Nazis honoured in Parliament


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Sep 25, 2023 • Last updated 6 hours ago • 3 minute read

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called it “extremely upsetting,” while House Speaker and Liberal MP Anthony Rota said he was “deeply sorry” about what had happened.


Of course, what had happened was that the federal government invited someone who fought for a Nazi unit in the Second World War to be honoured in the House of Commons while Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy was there.


One of the main claims made by Russian President Vladimir Putin to justify his invasion of Ukraine is that he needs to rid the country of Nazis. That claim is utter nonsense, yet here we have the Trudeau government bringing in a soldier who fought for a unit under Nazi control and giving him a hero’s welcome.

Yaroslav Hunka, a 98 year-old veteran who had fought the Soviet Russian army, was given not one but two standing ovations after his introduction by Rota.

“I am deeply sorry that I have offended many with my gesture and remarks,” Rota said early Monday, while facing calls from the NDP and Bloc Quebecois to resign.


“No one, not even anyone among you, fellow parliamentarians, or from the Ukrainian delegation, was privy to my intention or my remarks prior to their delivery.”

His remarks, calling Hunka “a Ukrainian and a Canadian hero” are problematic, but that he was allowed to be introduced in Parliament at all is the bigger concern. A 98-year-old man is hardly a security concern — he can’t do much while being wheeled around, as he was — but political concerns are another matter.

The fact that all 338 MPs stood to clap and cheer as Hunka gives Putin a major public relations victory. Putin has been claiming from the start that Ukraine is controlled by Nazis — despite Zelenskyy being Jewish, while Ukraine’s Defence Minister Rustem Umerov is a Muslim.


None of that matters now; we gave Putin a PR victory that they have been taking advantage of since.

“Canadian Parliament gives standing ovation to the Nazi SS butcher,” Russia’s embassy in Canada posted online on Sunday.

It was the first of many offensive posts, which brings us back to the question of why we still allow Russian diplomats to stand on our soil and push propaganda.

“It’s going to be really important that all of us push back against Russian propaganda, Russian disinformation and continue our steadfast and unequivocal support for Ukraine,” Trudeau said.

The problem is the actions of the Trudeau government, or lack thereof, have given a huge win to the Putin regime. They can now point and say that not only did the Canadian government stand and cheer this man who fought in a Nazi regiment, but so did Zelenskyy.


Throughout Monday, the Trudeau government tried to claim that it had no role in admitting Hunka, or the two standing ovations that he received from Parliament.



Here’s the problem: Even if they didn’t have a responsibility for security vetting — which after the changes that came into effect after the 2014 terrorist attack they should have taken a role in — there is the political aspect. The Trudeau Liberals orchestrated every aspect of this visit as Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre was not even granted a few minutes with Zelenskyy, normal protocol for a foreign leader and the leader of the Opposition.


Poilievre asked that the government apologize for what had happened, for the embarrassment caused to Zelenskyy, and they refused to do so. The Liberal government tried to place all blame at the feet of Rota, a Liberal MP, a claim that anyone with a passing knowledge of how such events work would laugh at.

“Will he finally take responsibility for his latest embarrassment and apologize to Canadians for this massive failure,” Poilievre asked.

The response from the government was to blame the Speaker.

Asked if Rota would stay on, given the calls for his resignation, his office simply said they had no information to share at this time. Expect Liberal knives to come out for Rota on this in a way they should for Trudeau and his office.

The boss will survive, but not the Speaker.
 

spaminator

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Conservatives block Liberals' motion to erase recognition of Nazi praise incident
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Sep 25, 2023 • 1 minute read

Leave it to Justin Trudeau’s government to try to remove reality from the equation, some might say.


The Liberals on Monday sought to erase from the record of the House of Commons the celebration of Nazi war veteran Yaroslav Hunka, 98, during Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s visit last Friday.


Government House leader Karina Gould stood on Monday to seek unanimous consent to adopt a motion calling to strike “from the appendix of the House of Commons debates” and from “any House multimedia recording” the recognization made by Speaker Anthony Rota of Hunka, whom he described as “a Ukrainian hero, a Canadian hero.”

Conservatives were quick to deny the motion.



“It would be absolutely wrong to strike what was said from the record. It goes without saying that those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. What happened on Friday was shameful and brought embarrassment to this chamber,” said Conservative MP Marty Morantz.



Added Thornhill Conservative MP Melissa Lantsman in a post to social-media site X (formerly Twitter): “I’m glad I wasn’t there to witness this pathetic display, today.”

Rota has apologized, but is now facing calls for his resignation by two of the four recognized parties in the House since it was revealed that Hunka served in the First Ukrainian Division — also known as the Waffen-SS Galicia Division or the SS 14th Waffen Division — which was a voluntary unit that was under the command of the Nazis during the Second World War.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said that this moment, which led to a standing ovation by Zelenskyy and himself but also by all MPs and dignitaries in the galleries, was “deeply embarrassing to the Parliament of Canada and, by extension, to all Canadians.”
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Gees....what was the purpose of holding back more old junk? If ATACMS are outdated like Storm Shadow and SCALP and soon to be decommissioned why the bullshit?

More fucking lies?
 

spaminator

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Conservatives condemn Nazi in Commons, Liberals try to erase
The Liberals have been trying to pin all the blame on the Speaker of the House


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Sep 26, 2023 • Last updated 8 hours ago • 3 minute read

The Conservatives asked the House of Commons to condemn the appearance of a former Nazi soldier in chamber, the Liberals asked MPs to erase history.


The contrast between the reaction of the two parties to a deeply embarrassing event for Canada is shocking and telling.


Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre stood in the House before question period to raise a point of order and put a motion to the House.

“That, this House condemn the invitation and recognition of this individual at an address to the Parliament of Canada,” Poilievre said before going on to blame Prime Minister Justin Trudeau himself.



“That this House condemn the prime minister, and the Government of Canada for either failing to do appropriate vetting on this individual or having done vetting and failed to stop him being admitted to and recognized in Parliament.”


Asked for unanimous consent to pass the motion, Liberal MPs shouted out no.

Shortly after the end of question period, Liberal House Leader Karina Gould asked for a sweeping motion to erase history.

Gould asked that “the recognition made by the Speaker of the House of an individual present in the galleries during the joint address of His Excellency Volodymyr Zelenskyy be struck from the appendix of the House of Commons debate” and that the incident be erased from any and all multi-media.

This time it was the Conservatives who said no — and with good reason.

“It would be absolutely wrong to strike what was said from the record,” Conservative MP Marty Morantz said. “It goes without saying that those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. What happened on Friday was shameful and brought embarrassment to this chamber. It was an ugly reminder of what survivors of the Holocaust know all too well — we must never forget.”


Morantz called the request to erase what happened last week an attempt to wash the record clean.

The Liberals have been trying to pin all the blame on the Speaker of the House Anthony Rota, saying that he has control over the Commons. The Conservatives are arguing that the government failed to properly vet the guest list for security and political concerns, something they say rests with the government and not the Speaker.

Rota resigned Tuesday amid calls that he step down.

Conservative MP Andrew Scheer, who was Speaker when the 2014 terrorist attack happened on Parliament Hill, pointed to the change in structure for security after the attack. Scheer attempted to table in the Commons two documents, one showing the reporting structure for the Parliamentary Protective Service and the other a signed document outlining the changes.


Both of those documents show that the Parliamentary Protective Service now reports to the RCMP rather than the Speaker. The RCMP reports to the government through the minister of public safety.

The Trudeau Liberals have denied any role in this, even though Gould stood in the House early Monday and admitted that all guests were vetted. MPs and parties were required to submit lists of guests ahead of time in order for them to be admitted.

For certain past high-profile visits of world leaders, even those with passes for daily entrance to Parliament have been required to undergo an additional security screening by the RCMP.

The idea that 98-year-old Yaroslav Hunka was just admitted with no screening into an event inside Parliament with Trudeau and Zelenskyy doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.

On this front, the Trudeau Liberals are trying to deny history and now, to erase it as well. Poilievre is right — what happened should be condemned and so too should the government’s failure in this matter.

blilley@postmedia.com
 

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Poland starting extradition process against Canadian who served with Nazis

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Sep 26, 2023 • Last updated 8 hours ago • 4 minute read

In reaction to a former Nazi soldier who served in a unit responsible for the death of thousands of Polish citizens during the Second World War being cheered in Canada’s Parliament, Poland has begun the process to extradite the 98-year-old.

“In view of the scandalous events in the Canadian Parliament, which involved honouring, in the presence of President (Volodymyr) Zelenskyy, a member of the criminal Nazi SS Galizien formation, I have taken steps towards the possible extradition of this man to Poland,” posted Przemyslaw Czarnek on X on Tuesday.


Czarnek is Poland’s education and science minister who is also a lawyer.

And now Poland’s embassy in Ottawa has confirmed the posting.

“The Twitter (X) account that you have sent to us is a legitimate one. This is the account of the Minister Przemyslaw Czarnek,” said Sebastian Szyszczyński, First Secretary Political and Economic Division Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Ottawa.



The Polish ambassador to Canada, Witold Dzielski, previously told CTV “this is a person who participated in an organization that was targeting Poles, was committing mass murders of Poles, not only the military personnel but also civilians” and “for me, such people should not be present in public life and probably should be prosecuted.”

This is a stunning turn of events in what has been four days of fallout from Friday’s appearance in the House of Commons by Yaroslav Hunka, who received a standing ovation from all 338 elected Members of Parliament for what Speaker Anthony Rota called his heroic efforts in fighting Russia on behalf of Ukraine in the Second World War.

“We have here in chamber today, a Ukrainian Canadian world veteran from the Second World War who fought for Ukrainian independence against the Russians and continues to support the troops today even at his age of 98,” said Rota, who resigned Tuesday amid calls for him to step down.


Very quickly it was determined, Hunka was at that time a member of the largely volunteer 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS, referred to as the SS Galichina and considered a military branch of the Nazi Party, and he had even blogged about it and posted photographs.

The outrage has been extreme and relentless and not just in Canada.

But now Poland is looking to take the next step and bring Hunka back to their country to face potential prosecution over whatever role he could have played in what is described as an extreme slaughter at the hands of his unit.

The Prime Minister’s Office has yet to comment on this.

But at the face of it, Poland’s announced intentions are an appropriate and consistent response from those countries, religions and races who have for many decades approached Nazi atrocities in a similar manner. While many try to whitewash the history of the Nazis, and even have cenotaphs erected in Canada to honour them, there are more who are determined that history not be rewritten and justice is served.


This is Poland’s position on this matter.

After fully investigating Jaroslav Hunka's Nazi war record, Canada should tear down the cenotaph commemorating his former SS unit.

Investigating Hunka’s actions at that time, and how he was admitted to Canada in the 1950s, is par for the course for any individual who was linked to the Nazi Party following the war and the revelation of millions exterminated in the Holocaust. There is no statute of limitations on murder or genocide. And it does not matter what age a person is.

Canada also has a Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Program which had the mandate to “deny safe haven to persons believed to have committed or been complicit in war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide.”

In Hunka’s case, he has not been accused, charged or convicted of any of those things. He must be considered innocent until proven guilty. Attempts to reach him and his family have not been successful but they are welcome to dispute the revelations that have come to light.


So far, a family member’s Facebook page, which highlighted pictures of their day in Ottawa, has been deactivated.



What is known is Hunka has lived much of his adult life since coming to Canada in North Bay. There have been media reports that show that during the current war between Russia and Ukraine, he has attended pro-Ukrainian rallies in North Bay and Sudbury. His whereabouts are unknown but the widower does have children who are believed to live in Ontario.

The next period of his life will be interesting because if Poland or other nations proceed with extradition requests, under current law, Canada’s Criminal and International Court says, “Canada may arrest and surrender persons sought by the ICC for genocide, crimes against humanity” as it has done for tribunals involving the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

This time, the alleged crimes in question happened in Ukraine during the Second World War and Poland has indicated it’s starting the process to extradite this Canadian with a view to answer for whatever role he allegedly played.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
 

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Comedian Rob Schneider axes trip to Canada over Nazi tribute: 'Trudeau's tyranny'
'Don't you stupid f---ing Canadians know THIS ASS--- fought for the NAZIS?'


Author of the article:Mark Daniell
Published Sep 27, 2023 • 3 minute read

Comedian Rob Schneider is cancelling his Canadian vacation plans after Justin Trudeau’s Liberals led a parliamentary tribute to a Nazi in the House of Commons last week.


“I cancelled my trip to Canada,” Schneider, whose father is Jewish, wrote on X. “Trudeau’s tyranny against peaceful trucker protesters seems insignificant (compared) to this despicable and outrageous act of honouring one of ADOLF HITLER’S NAZI SS Soldiers by the Canadian Parliament. No words …”




During an official visit from Ukrainian President Volodymr Zelenskyy last Friday, disgraced House Speaker Anthony Rota honoured 98-year-old Yaroslav Hunka, who he said “fought for Ukrainian independence against the Russians” during the Second World War.

But after Hunka, who now lives in North Bay, Ont., received a thunderous tribute in the House it was revealed over the weekend that he served as part of a voluntary unit that was under the command of the Nazis and was also known as the Waffen-SS Galicia Division or the SS 14th Waffen Division.

The invitation became an international embarrassment, with Russia using the blunder to legitimize its full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

Schneider, a former castmember of Saturday Night Live, was one of the many notable names lashing out at the gaffe. “Don’t you stupid f—ing Canadians know THIS ASS— fought for the NAZIS?” he wrote on X. “This guy fought for Hitler! … THEE Hitler!”



During the tribute, Zelenskyy and all members of Parliament, including Prime Minister Trudeau and main opposition leaders, applauded the tearful Hunka.

“We all did this on the understanding that we were applauding a Canadian and Ukrainian war hero,” said Government House leader Karina Gould, who is a descendant of Holocaust survivors.

“I assumed he was a partisan. I assumed we were applauding someone who fought the Nazis and fought the Communists. Never in my life would I imagine the Speaker of the House would ask us to stand and applaud someone who fought with the Nazis.”

Before stepping down Tuesday, Rota acknowledged his gaffe saying that neither the Prime Minister’s Office nor the Ukrainian delegation had been aware of his decision to honour Hunka.



“I must step down as your speaker. I reiterate my profound regret for my error in recognizing an individual in the House during the joint address to Parliament and President Zelenskyy,” Rota said in the House of Commons on Monday.

Meanwhile, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre is demanding hearings to determine how this happened.

“Canada’s reputation is broken. This is by far the biggest hit Canada’s diplomatic reputation has ever taken in its history. And it happened under Justin Trudeau’s watch,” Poilievre said Tuesday.

Schneider was so disgusted by the parliamentary fiasco he went on to add that Canadian actor William Shatner should apologize for Rota’s error.

“I also feel I should apologize now for once DATING a girl who was Canadian,” Schneider joked. “I apologize. I also apologize for every Hockey game I’ve watched and for all the maple syrup I’ve drizzled on my pancakes.”


As the scandal unfolded, Trudeau called Hunka’s invitation “deeply embarrassing.”

“It’s extremely upsetting that this happened. The Speaker has acknowledged his mistake and has apologized,” Trudeau said Monday.

“But this is something that is deeply embarrassing to the Parliament of Canada and by extension to all Canadians.”

Trudeau then warned that the incident was fuel for Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has claimed the Ukraine invasion is about stopping Nazis.

“I think it’s going to be really important that all of us push back against Russian disinformation and continue our steadfast unequivocal support for Ukraine,” Trudeau said.

Schneider, who in the past has aired his skepticism over the coronavirus vaccines and called the shot “experimental gene therapy,” later returned to X to link Hunka to Trudeau’s COVID vaccine stance.


“GOOD NEWS CANADA!! THE NAZI WHO FOUGHT FOR HITLER AND WAS HONORED BY YOUR PRIME MINISTER AND YOUR HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT WAS TWICE VACCINATED AND DOUBLE BOOSTED!” he sarcastically wrote.

After Rota’s resignation, the Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo star went on to cheer the move. “That’s a very good START!” Schneider shared with his 1.6 million followers. “You are 1/3 of the way there. Now rid yourselves of Justin the Terrible Trudeau and his Henchperson … Chryssy Freeland!”

mdaniell@postmedia.com

X: @markhdaniell
 

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With Trudeau apology over, time to open secret Nazi files

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Sep 27, 2023 • 4 minute read

The better-late-than-never apology from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is a first step following Friday’s disturbing incident in which a man who served in a Nazi unit in the Second World War was given a standing ovation in the House of Commons.


The next step is opening the secret files that should offer a better understanding of how 2,000 members of the volunteer 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS — often referred to as the Galician Division, which was alleged to be involved in war crimes that the 1986 Deschenes Commission said it was unable to substantiate — were allowed into Canada in the 1950s, what they did in Ukraine between 1941 and 1945 and just who Yaroslav Hunka was in the seven decades he’s lived here.


“The government should unseal the unknown details from Deschenes Commission,” said Bernie Farber, chair of the Canadian Anti-Hate Network and who for many decades ran the Canadian Jewish Congress.



The Commission of Inquiry on War Criminals in Canada, ordered by then-prime minister Brian Mulroney in 1985, delved into the dirty past of how Nazis were cleared to come into Canada.

Commissioner Jules Deschenes found 200 cases of concern and 20 “hot” cases of alleged war criminals being here. But little is known about allegations against specific individuals, which remain confidential and have never been made public. It’s time to change that.


Of course, any probe should begin with the 98-year-old Hunka of North Bay, whose family contacted his Nipissing-Timiskaming MP Anthony Rota, the now-former Speaker of the House, to ask if he could attend Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s visit to Parliament. It not only resulted in his past war record being discovered, but it embarrassed MPs internationally for applauding him and caused Rota to accept full blame for the incident before resigning.



Many lingering questions remain, including how did no one know about his unit’s links to the Nazi regime? Also pertinent is understanding what was his role was with this unit and where was he stationed?

If the hidden files offer such information, Trudeau should release it now to allow those who have hunted, investigated and prosecuted Nazis over the last 78 years to do a deep dive into Hunka’s background.



We know he had a great life in Canada, a happy marriage and successful children who are pillars of their community. What we don’t know about him and many of the other 2,000 former Waffen SS members is if they were responsible for the genocide of thousands of Jewish, Slovak, Polish, Roma and LGBTQ people who did not get to live in freedom in Canada after the war because they were shot and dumped into shallow graves.

Farber is curious, too. They are not statistics for him.

“My father’s whole family was murdered by the Waffen SS,” he said.

He has a picture of his father with those family members. All but his father died.



Hunka and his family have gone into hiding, have scrubbed their social-media posts and have not commented when given a chance to clarify or explain his history in coming to Canada. This, in my view, is a mistake. For Hunka, this is an opportunity. It’s a chance to if not clear his name, then clear up for the victims’ families what he knew of his unit’s actions.

There should be no mercy. There should be no attempts to whitewash the actions of someone who fought with a Nazi unit.

While what happened in the Ottawa is a blight, one can’t wash away the fact that so many people with such ugly backgrounds got into the country so easily. A 60 Minutes report from 1997 shows legendary Mike Wallace interviewing U.S. Nazi hunter Steven Rambam, York University professor Irving Abella and Farber, during which came the revelation that some of the Waffen members allowed into Canada actually had an “SS” tattooed onto their arm.


It’s shocking, dark piece of Canadian history.



As it states in the Deschenes Commission findings, the postwar Nuremburg trials “concentrated on bringing to justice the major war criminals … like Adolf Eichmann and Josef Mengele,” but “not as much attention was paid to lesser war criminals” who as “lower-echelon Nazis and collaborators had acted as the instruments of the genocide programs initiated by the Nazi hierarchy.”

What about Hunka’s wartime actions? Does he have any tattoos and what was the significance of the embroidered red, white and black Vyshyvanka shirt he wore into the House?

There are so many questions he could be asked.

While this mess is disgraceful, the positive is now that the prime minister’s apology is out of the way, those classified Nazi records stashed away in a vault in Ottawa should be made public for all to see.
 

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Homeless enjoy fancy food as Anthony Rota's garden party cancelled
Lavish party scrapped after House Speaker resigned Tuesday for role in inviting a Nazi unit soldier into the Commons


Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Sep 28, 2023 • Last updated 16 hours ago • 3 minute read

Let them eat scallops!


Or perhaps shrimp, pulled beef, or meatballs.


Make that seared and crusted scallops, poached shrimp, pulled beef barbacoa and, of course, lamb meatballs.

The homeless will be eating well in Ottawa Friday. Or maybe, more accurately, they are enjoying the spoils of Canada’s parliamentarians.

To borrow from Matthew 15:36-28 they are getting “scrap from the master’s table.”


It seems a lavish garden party set for sitting MPs and media members who cover them didn’t happen.

Planned by then-speaker of the house Anthony Rota, scheduled for Tuesday evening at the speaker’s official Kingsmere residence – known as The Farm – was cancelled thanks to the Nipissing MP tendering his resignation from the job on Tuesday after apologizing for his part in inviting a former member of the World War II Waffen SS unit to sit in the gallery for Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s visit.


Invitation for a dinner at The Speaker of the House of Commons official Kingsmere residence known as The Farm.
Invitation for a dinner at The Speaker of the House of Commons official Kingsmere residence known as The Farm. PHOTO BY SUPPLIED
Bequeathed to Canada in 1950 by prime minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, the posh Farm sits on an acreage across the Ottawa River in Gatineau, Quebec.


While much of the world is astonished how embarrassing it was to invite Waffen SS member Jaroslav Hunka to the House of Commons, it turns out there is one positive thing that came out of having a man who served in a Nazi unit inside Canada’s Parliament. In what seems like a parody of Seinfeld’s Soup Nazi, the error in bringing in Hunka meant some fancy food will now go to deserving people down on their luck.

Perhaps opulent is the better word.


While it’s a story that is easy to politicize, it’s a lifeline for those in need of a sustenance. And the Ottawa Mission not only welcomes the addition, they already have a plan to utilize it over a number of meals to feed their growing constituency of people in need.

“We’re very grateful for this donation and the donations from all of our partners to meet the need,” spokesperson Aileen Leo said. “Our clients who live at the shelter and in the community will also appreciate it.”


“The donation will be used in our meal program for people staying at the Mission and also our community and food truck meal programs, which serves members of the community here at the shelter and across our community,” she added.

The Ottawa Mission said the fine foods that were coming their way thanks to the last-minute scrubbing of the speaker’s fiesta are “100 seared, crusted scallops, 200 poached shrimp, 200 small lamb meatballs, 10 kilograms of pulled beef barbacoa, 200 pieces of fried chicken, 100 bao buns, and, of course, 700 oysters.”

And for dessert, let them eat 100 servings of “pouding chomeur.”

Liberal Minister Domenic LeBlanc enjoys a cigar at cabinet retreat in PEI while much of Canada fights wild fires -- Counter Signal photo
Liberal cabinet minister Dominic LeBlanc enjoys a cigar at a retreat in P.E.I. — photo by The Counter Signal The Counter Signal
The whole thing offers an ugly insight into the disconnect Ottawa politicians have average Canadians, many of whom are struggling to buy groceries, cover their rent and pay their mortgages.


Understanding that some in government who sent in RSVPs for the party – which was to feature shuttle buses from parliament across to Quebec – were the same people ironically asking grocery giants to lower the prices, the Toronto Sun has asked how much was budgeted for this bash?

Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly eats ice cream.
Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly, left, eats ice cream while being questioned by Keean Bexte of The Counter Signal. The Counter Signal
Canadians saw this kind of flaunting of the riches this summer at the Liberal Party caucus retreat in PEI where there was an endless buffet of pictures of politicians smoking Cuban cigars, eating ice cream and scarfing down lobsters rolls.



Conservative MP Leslyn Lewis, who declined her invitation to the garden party, called it “disgraceful when people are hungry.”

However, she said the silver lining is that the grub will now go to people in need and she commended the Ottawa Mission for focusing on feeding people.



This donation will help with that but Leo reminds it will be consumed quickly and anybody wanting to help can offer a financial or food donation by visiting https://ottawamission.com/ or any local food bank in your own community.

“Food insecurity has worsened over the past almost four years since the beginning of the pandemic and the need for food across Ottawa has reached shocking levels,” she said. “This is why we served more than one million last year to people across Ottawa who would otherwise go hungry.”

This time her cooks will be working with top ingredients fit for parliamentarians.

jwarmington@postmedia.com

@joe_warmington
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Ghosts of the Nazis haunt us 78 years after their defeat

Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Published Sep 28, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read
ACTUAL NAZI: Hitler's odious ideology infiltrated Canadian POW camps. An undated picture shows Nazi Chancellor Adolf Hitler.
ACTUAL NAZI: An undated picture shows Nazi Chancellor Adolf Hitler. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTO /AFP/Getty Images
“This burning hatred, which was to infect so many Germans in that empire, would lead ultimately to a massacre so horrible and on such a scale as to leave an ugly scar on civilization that will surely last as long as man on earth.” — William L. Shirer, Rise and Fall of the Third Reich


My landlady in New York had turned her back patio into a tropical oasis.


And on that sweltering July day, the surroundings were fitting. As my ex-wife and I often did, we joined Elke and her longtime boyfriend, August, for a beer and schnapps. Both were German immigrants of the war generation.

Then August asked me: “Do you know what today is?”

Nope.

He continued: “Today is the day I was captured by the Americans in Normandy.”

I awkwardly replied: “Oh, how did you feel about that.”

“Total relief,” he said. “I knew I would survive the war.”

ACTUAL NAZIS: The Duke and Duchess saw lots to like in Nazi Germany. The Hitler Youth units parade in the streets of Soltau, in September 1937, in front of German nazi Führer and Chancellor Adolf Hitler (2nd L). The Hitler Youth was a paramilitary organization of the Nazi Party that existed from 1922 to 1945.
ACTUAL NAZIS: The Hitler Youth units parade in the streets of Soltau, in September 1937, in front of German Nazi Führer and Chancellor Adolf Hitler (2nd L). The Hitler Youth was a paramilitary organization of the Nazi Party that existed from 1922 to 1945. PHOTO BY FILES /GETTY IMAGES
August was 15 when he was captured that July day in 1944. A reluctant draftee into the Hitler Youth he was a long way from his family farm in East Prussia.

Where he grew up, there were Jews, Catholics, Russian Orthodox and Lutherans. It was a small farming village.



You knew — and relied upon — your neighbours. There was no simmering animosity or the kind of violent racism that set the world ablaze and very nearly exterminated European Jewry.

“The captain said to me and another guy, you stay here with the .50-calibre machine-gun overlooking the train tracks. If you see anything, shoot,” August said.

“All the rest were leaving. I knew we had just been handed a death sentence. So I waited a couple of hours and said to the other guy, ‘Let’s go.’ He was reluctant and said, ‘But we have our orders.’

“I said to him, ‘If we stay, we will die,'” August told me.

The man — not much older than August — reluctantly agreed. August said the other young soldier was more sympathetic to the Third Reich’s way of thinking.


ACTUAL NAZI: Nazi Adolf Eichmann didn't seem to understand the gravity of the charges against him.
ACTUAL NAZI: Nazi Adolf Eichmann didn’t seem to understand the gravity of the charges against him. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /GETTY IMAGES
For two weeks, they wandered around Normandy, breaking into farmhouses and stealing cheese and cognac. Until, inevitably, they were captured by U.S. Army Rangers.

He was sent to a POW camp in Scotland and then to Maryland. Once in the U.S. camp, he was allowed visitors from Detroit who were relatives.

After the war, he immigrated to America where he became a prosperous contractor and property developer.

“Hitler and the Nazis, they very nearly ruined my life … ended it before it began. They were liars and cold-blooded murderers, I hated them then and I hate them now,” he added.

Actual Nazis.

Members of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest neo-Nazi groups in the US, hold a swastika burning after a rally on April 21, 2018 in Draketown, Georgia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
ACTUAL NAZIS: Members of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest neo-Nazi groups in the U.S., hold a swastika burning after a rally on April 21, 2018 in Draketown, Georgia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Has Hollywood ever created a more vile, evil caste of killers and thugs? Commies don’t quite cut it.

In the wake of the brouhaha featuring the Speaker of the House of Commons, Anthony Rota, who resigned on Tuesday, and the aged Nazi invited into our Parliament, a phrase has emerged in its description of the man.


“Actual Nazi.”

ACTUAL NAZI: The photo taken between 1941 and 1943 near Vinnitsa, Ukraine, provided by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum shows German soldiers of the Waffen-SS and the Reich Labour Service looking on as a member of an Einsatzgruppe prepares to shoot a Ukrainian Jew kneeling on the edge of a mass grave filled with corpses.
ACTUAL NAZI: The photo taken between 1941 and 1943 near Vinnitsa, Ukraine, provided by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum shows German soldiers of the Waffen-SS and the Reich Labour Service looking on as a member of an Einsatzgruppe prepares to shoot a Ukrainian Jew kneeling on the edge of a mass grave filled with corpses.
This is not the cheap insult hurled about by activists not sure of what they are even talking about.

My encounters with the real deal have, thankfully, been few and far between.

In the days following the terror attacks on 9/11, I interviewed the head of one of a handful of U.S. Nazi organizations in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. With a Glock on his Formica table, he snarled at me: “So, you’re from the ‘Jew’ York Post …”

Actual Nazi.

Then, in sickening detail, he explained why he thought the snuffing out of 3,000 lives that terrible September day was a good thing because “my enemy’s enemy is my friend.”

A couple of years ago I wrote a Sunday column about wannabe American Fuhrer George Lincoln Rockwell, and his 1967 assassination by a disaffected member.

A disgraced former teacher with troubling views on race in general and Jews in particular wrote me an email in response, suggesting that my legs should be broken.

Actual Nazi.

There is a chilling difference.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
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University of Alberta returns endowment honouring Ukrainian who fought with Nazis
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Sep 28, 2023 • 1 minute read

EDMONTON — The University of Alberta is returning endowment funds from the family of a Ukrainian man whose military service was linked to the Nazis.


Since 2019, the university’s Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies has had a $30,000 endowment carrying the name Yaroslav Hunka.


Hunka was introduced in the House of Commons last week during a visit from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.

It was later revealed that Hunka had fought in a Ukrainian unit set up by Nazi Germany to fight the Soviet Union.

The revelation forced the resignation of Anthony Rota as House Speaker and an apology on behalf of Parliament by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

The university has now closed the endowment and returned the money to the family.

“The university recognizes and regrets the unintended harm caused,” said a statement from Verna Yiu, vice-president academic.

“I want to express our commitment to address antisemitism in any of its manifestations, including the ways in which the Holocaust continues to resonate in the present.”

She said the university is re-examining its naming policies for endowment funds.

In Ottawa, an interim speaker will preside as the House of Commons resumes sitting for the first time since Rota’s resignation.

The fallout continues, with MPs expected to call for various House committees to investigate how it could have happened.

Liberal MP Anthony Housefather says Parliament needs to fix the procedures so something like this never happens again.

“It’s totally unacceptable that someone with that kind of past was recognized in the chamber,” Housefather said.
 

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Wikipedia page for man who fought in Nazi unit honoured in Parliament could be deleted
Author of the article:Spiro Papuckoski
Published Sep 28, 2023 • Last updated 22 hours ago • 2 minute read

The Wikipedia page created for the man honoured in the House of Commons who was later revealed to be linked to the Nazis may be deleted.


Speaker Anthony Rota invited 98-year-old Yaroslav Hunka last Friday to attend an address by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. MPs clapped after being told by Rota that Hunka was a Ukrainian and Canadian war hero who fought the Soviet Union during the Second World War.


Rota said he was responsible for the invite and quickly apologized. He resigned days later as Speaker.

On Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau apologized on behalf of Parliament.

Following the controversial honour, a Wikipedia entry was created to document Hunka’s association with the Nazis and the political fallout.

But one user of the web-based encyclopedia has tagged the article to be “considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedia’s deletion policy,” in an effort to possibly scrub the incident from the internet.


However, for an entry to remain on the site, one of the criteria it must meet is that it is notable and relevant.

When an article is tagged for possible deletion, Wikipedia users do not vote on whether to keep it or not. Instead, users make arguments for or against the entry.

Many users suggested to keep the article.

“Removing this summary from Wikipedia will remove one of the most detailed summaries about this Nazi from the internet, which will aid conspiracy theorists and the like,” one person wrote.

Another pointed to the international news coverage and Poland seeking his extradition as a war criminal.

“While the subject may not have been very notable on his own for his actions during the war, the politization of him in recent times has definitely made him notable enough to keep,” argued another user.



Others suggested the article should be renamed to the specific incident in Parliament, arguing Hunka is not a notable public figure himself.

Most users who would like to see the article removed cited the individual is only notable for one event and, according to Wikipedia, the entry should be written about that event and not the person.

As of now, the entry has an added protection, which allows edits only by users with at least 30 days tenure and at least 500 edits.