Metropolitan Police officer arrested on suspicion of murdering woman

Blackleaf

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Met Police officer arrested on suspicion of murder after disappearance of Sarah Everard​

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Sarah Everard: Human remains found in Kent woodland​

 
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spaminator

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London murder case triggers fear about women's safety
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Kate Holton
Publishing date:Mar 11, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo.
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /Metropolitan Police photo
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LONDON — Women in Britain poured out their fears and anger over how unsafe they feel walking the streets after the disappearance of a woman in London and the arrest of a police officer on suspicion of her kidnap and murder.

Sarah Everard, 33, was last seen at 9:30 p.m. on March 3 as she walked home from a friend’s house in south London. Her image, smiling at the camera or caught on CCTV that evening, has been splashed across British newspapers all week.


Anxiety turned to grief after news late on Wednesday that police investigating Everard’s disappearance had found remains in a wood outside London, resulting in an outpouring of personal accounts by women of their own experiences and fears.

“The disappearance of Sarah and the absolute tragedy around that has really touched a nerve with a lot of women,” said Anna Birley, 31, one of the organizers of a planned “Reclaim These Streets” vigil to honor Everard and demand change.

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“We feel really angry that it’s an expectation put on women that we need to change our behavior to stay safe. The problem isn’t women, the problem is that women aren’t safe on our streets,” said Birley.

Women flooded social media with posts about the steps they take when out alone at night to keep safe, including clutching keys to use as a weapon and wearing trainers to help them run. Many raged at the violence against women that made them feel they had to take such measures.


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Others detailed a catalog of incidents of harassment by men in public over the decades since they were schoolgirls.

“These are so powerful because each and every woman can relate,” Home Secretary (interior minister) Priti Patel said. “Every woman should feel safe to walk on our streets without fear of harassment or violence.”


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Legislator Jess Phillips, the opposition Labour Party’s policy chief on domestic violence, read out in the chamber of the House of Commons the names of all 118 women murdered by men in the United Kingdom last year.

“The message that needs to be sent is that male violence is something that has to be tackled and challenged and the justice system and society has to wake up to that,” said Phillips.

The head of London’s police force, Cressida Dick, said she and her colleagues were “utterly appalled” at news that a police officer had been arrested in connection with Everard’s abduction, sparking a wave of shock and anger.

An undated handout picture released by the Metropolitan Police on March 10, 2021, shows CCTV footage of missing Sarah Everard on March 3, as she walked along the A205 Poynders Road, from the junction with Cavendish Road, in the direction of Tulse Hill in south London
An undated handout picture released by the Metropolitan Police on March 10, 2021, shows CCTV footage of missing Sarah Everard on March 3, as she walked along the A205 Poynders Road, from the junction with Cavendish Road, in the direction of Tulse Hill in south London PHOTO BY METROPOLITAN POLICE /AFP via Getty Images
Police on Thursday were given extra time to question the officer, whose job is to guard diplomatic buildings, on suspicion of kidnap, murder and indecent exposure.

A woman in her 30s, who media said was his wife, was also detained on suspicion of assisting an offender, but has since been released on police bail.

England’s police watchdog, the Independent Office for Police Conduct, said it had launched an investigation into the London police force’s handling of the case.


The arrested officer was reported to police on Feb. 28 over allegations of indecent exposure in a south London fast food restaurant, several days before Everard disappeared.

The watchdog also said it would look closer at how the suspect sustained head injuries that required hospital treatment, which police said occurred while he was alone in his cell.

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Dick sought to reassure women, saying it was “incredibly rare” for a woman to be abducted from the streets.

“But I completely understand that despite this, women in London and the wider public, particularly those in the area where Sarah went missing, will be worried and may well be feeling scared,” she said.

Although the remains have not yet been formally identified, Everard’s family paid tribute, saying their “beautiful daughter Sarah was taken from us and we are appealing for any information that will help to solve this terrible crime.”

“Sarah was bright and beautiful – a wonderful daughter and sister. She was kind and thoughtful, caring and dependable,” the family said in a statement.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he was shocked and deeply saddened by developments in the case.


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The “Reclaim These Streets” vigil will take place on Saturday in Clapham Common in southwest London, near where Everard was last seen.
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Blackleaf

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London murder case triggers fear about women's safety

Approximately two thirds of all murder victims in Britain every year are men and boys (64% in 2020).

All over the world, men and boys are far more likely to be victims of violence and murder than women and girls are.

So this is just more woke nonsense.
 

spaminator

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Missing London woman's body found in woodland, police confirm
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 12, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo.
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /Metropolitan Police photo
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LONDON — British police said on Friday that a body found in a wood outside London was that of Sarah Everard, whose disappearance last week has sparked anger and fears among women about their safety.

Everard, 33, disappeared while walking home from a friend’s house in south London last Wednesday and police have arrested a serving officer on suspicion of her kidnap and murder.


Her case has led to an outpouring of personal accounts by women of their own experiences and fears of walking streets alone at night, and a campaign for action to address this.

Speaking outside the London police headquarters on Friday, Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave confirmed a body found two days ago was that of the missing woman.

“I know that the public feel hurt and angry about what has happened, and those are sentiments that I share personally,” Ephgrave said. “I also recognize the wider concerns that are being raised quite rightly about the safety of women in public spaces in London and also elsewhere in the country.”

Flowers and messages of condolence for Sarah Everard are seen as police officers patrol near the woodland where police officers found human remains near Ashford, southeast England, on March 12, 2021.
Flowers and messages of condolence for Sarah Everard are seen as police officers patrol near the woodland where police officers found human remains near Ashford, southeast England, on March 12, 2021. PHOTO BY GLYN KIRK /AFP via Getty Images
Before the remains were formally identified, Everard’s family had paid tribute to their “beautiful daughter Sarah” and appealed for help to solve “this terrible crime.”

Home Secretary (interior minister) Priti Patel said she would do all she could to protect women and girls following the outcry that has followed Everard’s disappearance.

“Every woman & girl should be free to walk our streets without the slightest fear of harassment, abuse or violence,” she said on Twitter.

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However, police have been criticized by organizers of a planned “Reclaim These Streets” vigil on Saturday near to where Everard was last seen, who said officers had warned it would be unlawful under current COVID-19 restrictions.


Detectives on Thursday were given extra time to question the arrested police officer, who is aged in his 40s and whose job is to guard diplomatic buildings. A woman in her 30s, who media said was his partner, was released on police bail after having been detained on suspicion of assisting an offender.

The police watchdog, the Independent Office for Police Conduct, has also launched an investigation into the handling of the case as several days before Everard disappeared, the arrested officer had been reported over allegations of indecent exposure in a south London fast food restaurant.
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Blackleaf

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Her case has led to an outpouring of personal accounts by women of their own experiences and fears of walking streets alone at night, and a campaign for action to address this.

Men are far more in danger than women walking the streets at night.

Though I suppose setting up a campaign for action to address that isn't very woke and right-on.
 

spaminator

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UK cop charged with murder of 33-year-old woman
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 12, 2021 • 22 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo.
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /Metropolitan Police photo
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LONDON — British police have charged an officer with the kidnap and murder of 33-year-old Sarah Everard, whose disappearance last week has sparked anger and fears among women about their safety.

Constable Wayne Couzens, 48, who guarded diplomatic buildings, will appear in court on Saturday. Everard disappeared while walking home from a friend’s house in south London on March 3.


The Metropolitan police had confirmed that a body found in a wood outside London was that of the missing woman.

Her case has led to an outpouring of personal accounts by women of their own experiences and fears of walking streets alone at night, and a campaign for action to address this.

“The investigation continues of course,” Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave told reporters. “I would like to use this opportunity to encourage anyone that thinks they might have useful information to give, to get in contact with us.”

Flowers and messages of condolence for Sarah Everard are seen as police officers patrol near the woodland where police officers found human remains near Ashford, southeast England, on March 12, 2021.
Flowers and messages of condolence for Sarah Everard are seen as police officers patrol near the woodland where police officers found human remains near Ashford, southeast England, on March 12, 2021. PHOTO BY GLYN KIRK /AFP via Getty Images
He had said earlier in the day that he understood the hurt and anger sparked by the case. “Those are sentiments that I share personally,” Ephgrave said. “I also recognize the wider concerns that are being raised quite rightly about the safety of women in public spaces in London and also elsewhere in the country.”

Home Secretary (interior minister) Priti Patel said she would do all she could to protect women and girls following the outcry that has followed Everard’s disappearance.

“Every woman & girl should be free to walk our streets without the slightest fear of harassment, abuse or violence,” she said on Twitter.

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However, police have been criticized by organizers of a planned “Reclaim These Streets” vigil on Saturday near to where Everard was last seen, after officers said it could not take place due to COVID-19 restrictions.


A woman in her 30s, who media said was the partner of Couzens, was released on police bail after having been detained on suspicion of assisting an offender.
 

spaminator

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Londoners protest after police officer charged with woman's murder
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
David Milliken and Natalie Thomas
Publishing date:Mar 13, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
A woman reacts at a memorial site in Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, March 13, 2021.
A woman reacts at a memorial site in Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, March 13, 2021. PHOTO BY HANNAH MCKAY /REUTERS
Article content
LONDON — Police in London clashed with mourners and protesters on Saturday after more than a thousand people gathered to mark the killing of a 33-year-old woman, hours after the police officer charged with her murder appeared in court.

Sarah Everard’s disappearance as she walked home on the evening of March 3 had led to a wave of accounts from women about the dangers of walking streets alone at night, and dismay at the failure of police and wider society to tackle this.


Early on Saturday an impromptu memorial with flowers and candles sprang up around the bandstand on Clapham Common in southwest London, near where Everard was last seen alive.

Kate, Britain’s Duchess of Cambridge, was among those who paid their respects. A palace official said Kate “remembers what it was like to walk around London at night before she was married.”

By late on Saturday around a thousand people – mostly women – gathered at the site to pay their respects and protest at the lack of security they felt when out alone. Some chanted “shame on you” at police who were present.

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Campaign groups had wanted to organize a formal vigil, but London’s Metropolitan Police said people should not gather due to coronavirus restrictions. The head of the force, Cressida Dick, said any vigil “would be unlawful and would be unsafe.”

As tensions mounted, Reuters witnesses saw police drag several women away from the gathering on Clapham Common.

Police were not immediately able to say how many people they had arrested.


London Mayor Sadiq Khan – who is responsible for policing in the city – said officers’ response “was at times neither appropriate or proportionate” and added that he was seeking an urgent explanation from Dick.

Labour Party leader Keir Starmer called the scenes “deeply disturbing” and Conservative interior minister Priti Patel said she too wanted answers from police about “upsetting” images.

Earlier on Saturday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he and his partner Carrie Symonds would light a candle in memory of Everard.

“I will do everything I can to make sure the streets are safe and ensure women and girls do not face harassment or abuse,” he said.

Appearing at London’s Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Saturday morning, 48-year-old police officer Wayne Couzens, wearing a grey tracksuit, spoke only to confirm his identity.


Couzens’s lawyer did not enter a plea to the charges of kidnap and murder ahead of a fuller court hearing scheduled for Tuesday. Couzens remains in custody.

Police discovered Everard’s body on Wednesday in woodland about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of London. The court heard that her body was found in a builder’s refuse bag, and was identified using dental records.

Couzens joined the Metropolitan Police in 2018 and guarded foreign embassies before his arrest.

England’s police watchdog has launched an investigation into the Metropolitan Police’s handling of the case.
1615682879514.png
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Londoners protest after police officer charged with woman's murder
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
David Milliken and Natalie Thomas
Publishing date:Mar 13, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
A woman reacts at a memorial site in Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, March 13, 2021.
A woman reacts at a memorial site in Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, March 13, 2021. PHOTO BY HANNAH MCKAY /REUTERS
Article content
LONDON — Police in London clashed with mourners and protesters on Saturday after more than a thousand people gathered to mark the killing of a 33-year-old woman, hours after the police officer charged with her murder appeared in court.

Sarah Everard’s disappearance as she walked home on the evening of March 3 had led to a wave of accounts from women about the dangers of walking streets alone at night, and dismay at the failure of police and wider society to tackle this.


Early on Saturday an impromptu memorial with flowers and candles sprang up around the bandstand on Clapham Common in southwest London, near where Everard was last seen alive.

Kate, Britain’s Duchess of Cambridge, was among those who paid their respects. A palace official said Kate “remembers what it was like to walk around London at night before she was married.”

By late on Saturday around a thousand people – mostly women – gathered at the site to pay their respects and protest at the lack of security they felt when out alone. Some chanted “shame on you” at police who were present.

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Campaign groups had wanted to organize a formal vigil, but London’s Metropolitan Police said people should not gather due to coronavirus restrictions. The head of the force, Cressida Dick, said any vigil “would be unlawful and would be unsafe.”

As tensions mounted, Reuters witnesses saw police drag several women away from the gathering on Clapham Common.

Police were not immediately able to say how many people they had arrested.


London Mayor Sadiq Khan – who is responsible for policing in the city – said officers’ response “was at times neither appropriate or proportionate” and added that he was seeking an urgent explanation from Dick.

Labour Party leader Keir Starmer called the scenes “deeply disturbing” and Conservative interior minister Priti Patel said she too wanted answers from police about “upsetting” images.

Earlier on Saturday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he and his partner Carrie Symonds would light a candle in memory of Everard.

“I will do everything I can to make sure the streets are safe and ensure women and girls do not face harassment or abuse,” he said.

Appearing at London’s Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Saturday morning, 48-year-old police officer Wayne Couzens, wearing a grey tracksuit, spoke only to confirm his identity.


Couzens’s lawyer did not enter a plea to the charges of kidnap and murder ahead of a fuller court hearing scheduled for Tuesday. Couzens remains in custody.

Police discovered Everard’s body on Wednesday in woodland about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of London. The court heard that her body was found in a builder’s refuse bag, and was identified using dental records.

Couzens joined the Metropolitan Police in 2018 and guarded foreign embassies before his arrest.

England’s police watchdog has launched an investigation into the Metropolitan Police’s handling of the case.
View attachment 6936

What gets me is that the same MSM and politicians which normally condemn "covidiots" for being in large groups are now attacking the police for arresting the people who were taking part in a vigil for his woman. They support these people being on a vigil! So it seems like it's one rule for these people and another for almost everybody else. Why do the press and politicians think it's alright for these people to be in a group of hundreds?

The politicians hounding police for arresting these people is even more sickening: Home Secretary Priti Patel is asking for Met Commissioner Cressida Dick to provide her with a report. A Lib Dem MP is demanding Dick resign. Yet the police are just imposing the laws that the politicians made. They are just doing their job. In this case the politicians have come up with these laws and are now attacking the police for enforcing them!

Also, there's something very fishy about the Sarah Everard case. Hundreds of people get murdered in the UK every year, and almost all of them are barely reported. Yet this case is massive news all over the media and Boris Johnson has even put a lantern outside No10 tonight in her honour. Meanwhile, a man was murdered on the same day as this woman yet it's just a minor story in the news. She must be the first ordinary murder victim ever to have a lamp put outside the PM's home in her honour.

So you are not allowed to be out in large groups - yet the politicians and MSM, who normally attack people for being out in large groups, support these people for taking part in a mass vigil and attack the police for imposing the laws that the politicians have come up with.

Hundreds of people are murdered every year yet they are barely reported, yet this murder is massive news all over the media, it's been spoken about in Parliament, and Boris leaves a lamp outside No10.

There's something not right.
 
Last edited:

spaminator

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U.K. cops face backlash after dragging mourners from vigil for murdered woman
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 14, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Women mourn at a memorial site at the Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, Britain March 14, 2021.
Women mourn at a memorial site at the Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, Britain March 14, 2021. PHOTO BY HENRY NICHOLLS /REUTERS
Article content
LONDON — London police faced a backlash from the public and politicians on Sunday for their heavy-handed tactics in breaking up an outdoor vigil for a woman whose suspected killer is a police officer.

The disappearance of Sarah Everard, 33, as she walked home on the evening of March 3, has provoked a huge outpouring of grief and dismay in Britain at the failure of police and wider society to tackle violence against women.


Police had denied permission for a vigil on Saturday evening at London’s Clapham Common, near where Everard was last seen alive, citing regulations aimed at preventing the spread of coronavirus.

But hundreds of people, mostly women, gathered peacefully at the park in defiance of the ban to pay their respects to Everard throughout the day, including Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge.

Late on Saturday dozens of police officers marched into the crowd to shouts of “shame on you.” Scuffles broke out and officers dragged women away from the scene.

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“Last night people were very, very upset, there was a great deal of emotion, completely understandably, and the police, being as they are operationally independent, will be having to explain that to the Home Secretary,” safeguarding minister Victoria Atkins told Sky News.

Home Secretary Priti Patel, the minister in charge of policing, described footage of the incident as “upsetting.” The BBC reported she had ordered an independent inquiry after an initial police report left some questions unanswered.


London Mayor Sadiq Khan also said he was not satisfied with police chiefs’ explanation of the events and officers’ conduct must be examined.

An image of officers handcuffing a woman as she lay on the floor was widely shared and condemned on social media.

The woman, Patsy Stevenson, told LBC radio: “The main point that everyone was trying to get across when everything happened is that women don’t feel safe, they don’t feel safe walking down a street and that’s the bare minimum we should feel the freedom to do.”

She said she was fined 200 pounds for breaching COVID regulations

Everard’s murder has resonated with woman across the country, prompting thousands to share on social media their experiences of violence and sexual assaults perpetrated by men, and vividly describe the daily fear they feel.


A steady flow of quiet mourners visited the site of the vigil on Sunday, placing flowers around a bandstand.

“I feel very angry that they think that they have the right to dictate how we mourn and how we react,” 24-year old student Lilith Blackwell told Reuters at the bandstand.

Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Helen Ball defended the officers’ actions and said they were faced with a very difficult decision.

“Hundreds of people were packed tightly together, posing a very real risk of easily transmitting Covid-19,” she said.

A police officer charged with Everard’s murder appeared in court on Saturday. Police discovered her body on Wednesday in woodland about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of London. The court heard that her body was found in a builder’s refuse bag, and identified using dental records.
1615752120769.png
 

Blackleaf

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Oct 9, 2004
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U.K. cops face backlash after dragging mourners from vigil for murdered woman
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 14, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Women mourn at a memorial site at the Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, Britain March 14, 2021.
Women mourn at a memorial site at the Clapham Common Bandstand, following the kidnap and murder of Sarah Everard, in London, Britain March 14, 2021. PHOTO BY HENRY NICHOLLS /REUTERS
Article content
LONDON — London police faced a backlash from the public and politicians on Sunday for their heavy-handed tactics in breaking up an outdoor vigil for a woman whose suspected killer is a police officer.

The disappearance of Sarah Everard, 33, as she walked home on the evening of March 3, has provoked a huge outpouring of grief and dismay in Britain at the failure of police and wider society to tackle violence against women.


Police had denied permission for a vigil on Saturday evening at London’s Clapham Common, near where Everard was last seen alive, citing regulations aimed at preventing the spread of coronavirus.

But hundreds of people, mostly women, gathered peacefully at the park in defiance of the ban to pay their respects to Everard throughout the day, including Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge.

Late on Saturday dozens of police officers marched into the crowd to shouts of “shame on you.” Scuffles broke out and officers dragged women away from the scene.

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“Last night people were very, very upset, there was a great deal of emotion, completely understandably, and the police, being as they are operationally independent, will be having to explain that to the Home Secretary,” safeguarding minister Victoria Atkins told Sky News.

Home Secretary Priti Patel, the minister in charge of policing, described footage of the incident as “upsetting.” The BBC reported she had ordered an independent inquiry after an initial police report left some questions unanswered.


London Mayor Sadiq Khan also said he was not satisfied with police chiefs’ explanation of the events and officers’ conduct must be examined.

An image of officers handcuffing a woman as she lay on the floor was widely shared and condemned on social media.

The woman, Patsy Stevenson, told LBC radio: “The main point that everyone was trying to get across when everything happened is that women don’t feel safe, they don’t feel safe walking down a street and that’s the bare minimum we should feel the freedom to do.”

She said she was fined 200 pounds for breaching COVID regulations

Everard’s murder has resonated with woman across the country, prompting thousands to share on social media their experiences of violence and sexual assaults perpetrated by men, and vividly describe the daily fear they feel.


A steady flow of quiet mourners visited the site of the vigil on Sunday, placing flowers around a bandstand.

“I feel very angry that they think that they have the right to dictate how we mourn and how we react,” 24-year old student Lilith Blackwell told Reuters at the bandstand.

Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Helen Ball defended the officers’ actions and said they were faced with a very difficult decision.

“Hundreds of people were packed tightly together, posing a very real risk of easily transmitting Covid-19,” she said.

A police officer charged with Everard’s murder appeared in court on Saturday. Police discovered her body on Wednesday in woodland about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of London. The court heard that her body was found in a builder’s refuse bag, and identified using dental records.
View attachment 6968

The cops were just doing their job. Those people were in their hundreds and clearly breaking lockdown rules.

It's very noticeable that the same MSM and politicians who attack people for going to parties or to crowded beaches or to anti-lockdown protests, branding them "covidiots, are now attacking the police for just going their jobs and trying to break up hundreds of covidiots.

And how crazy is it that politicians are condemning the police just for enforcing the very laws that THOSE VERY SAME POLITICIANS CREATED? Home Secretary Priti Patel is condemning the police for policing the very laws that HER GOVERNMENT put in place. Bizarre!

The moral of this story is that if you're middle class lefties then you're allowed to break covid laws and woe betide the police for enacting those laws.

If you're working class and break the laws - well, we know what happens then.
 

Blackleaf

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Right now, we've got The Graun, The Daily Fail, Al-Bibisiyah and other papers and media outlets condemning the police for breaking up these lefty middle class protestors clearly breaching covid laws. They're the same newspapers who almost daily condemn the working class masses for breaking covid laws. The hypocrisy here is staggering and blatant. They don't even try to hide it.
 

Blackleaf

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The Left and others who called for the creation of an authoritarian state don't like it now that their own got the full brunt of it last night...

Assembly for me, but not for thee

The anger over the police assault on the Sarah Everard vigil has exposed the double standards of the liberal elite.

Assembly for me, but not for thee

BRENDAN O'NEILL

EDITOR

14th March 2021

Spiked

There were two disturbing things about the scuffles at the Sarah Everard vigil. The first was the behaviour of the cops. The second was the shock of some of the attendees and of the high-profile feminists, columnists and politicians who were cheering them on, who genuinely could not believe that their public assembly was being assaulted and dispersed. These people seem to think that lockdown measures don’t apply to them. That the authoritarianism of the past 12 months that many of them demanded and celebrated is for other people, little people, those people whose views and beliefs and right to assemble are not nearly as important as ours. Saturday’s depressing spectacle illustrated just how out of touch both the Met Police and the chattering classes are in 2021.

The actions of the police were despicable. This was a gathering mainly of women, who wanted to show their sorrow for Sarah Everard and their opposition to male violence. And what did the cops, many of them burly men, do? They manhandled the women. They dragged them away from where they were laying flowers and paying their respects. They threw some of them to the ground, arrested others, tried to break up this act of public mourning and of public defiance. It was some of the most boneheaded, tone-deaf policing we have seen in recent years. The images of Met officers attacking women who were expressing anger over the alleged murder of a woman by a Met officer have sent shockwaves around the world. No wonder people are calling for Cressida Dick to stand down.

But the response of the opinion-forming set to this bully-boy assault on a peaceful public assembly has been striking, too. There has been shock and disgust, rightly. And yet much of it has come from politicos and commentators who spent much of the past year demanding tighter authoritarian controls on people’s right to gather in public. Some of it has come from MPs who voted for these controls. Even the home secretary, Priti Patel, overseer of the stifling, liberty-crushing emergency laws we currently live under, who is now trying to push through permanent, post-Covid restrictions on the right to protest, has expressed angst about what happened on Saturday. I’m sorry, you cannot applaud the construction of an authoritarian state of the like we have never seen in the UK and then be surprised by its consequences. At least not if you want to be taken seriously.

From the right to the left, there has been condemnation of the cops’ assault on the Everard vigil. Yet from the same right to the same left there was widespread support over the past year for placing the population under something akin to house arrest and severely restricting our right to meet other people in public. Whether it was the Corbynista left crying for ever-tighter clampdowns on what we were allowed to do (their chief criticism of Boris Johnson is that he was never quite authoritarian enough), or the soft Tory set who have raged against ‘Covidiots’ and ‘Covid denialists’ (by which they mean anyone who suggests there might be better alternatives to lockdown), there was a depressing consensus among political influencers about the need to suspend fundamental civil liberties in the name of keeping people safe from disease.

Those of us who warned that this would damage democratic life, that we should think very seriously indeed before giving cops the leeway to break up peaceful protests and citizens’ assemblies, were written off as cranks who wanted the virus to ‘let rip’. Yet we were right. The events on Saturday are the dire result of elevating ‘Covid safety’ above everything else, even the age-old right to safely meet with others in public in order to register your dissatisfaction or anger with the government, the establishment or the police. There is a question that must be answered by many of the great and good expressing alarm over what happened on Saturday: did you think it was possible to create a police state without the police behaving in this manner? Are you serious?

The truth – and it’s a disturbing one – seems to be that they thought these restrictions were not for people like them. Not really. The horror of these mostly middle-class campaigners gives away their sense of entitlement. Covid clampdowns – those are for riff-raff like anti-lockdown protesters, right? And for Hasidic Jewish weddings? And for gangs of working-class football fans, like those Glasgow Rangers fans who gathered in public a couple of weeks ago and who were roundly, furiously condemned by some of the same people currently in a state of shock that their public assembly was shut down on Saturday. Right? Surely these unprecedented measures are for other people, for evil lockdown sceptics or lower-class sports-lovers, not for refined politicos like us. Not for feminists concerned about male violence, or middle-class graduates who support BLM and XR (their recent public gatherings were backed by the media elites, too).

As if it wasn’t bad enough that Britain has descended into authoritarianism over the past 12 months, it seems some influential people believe this authoritarianism should be enforced in a very partisan way. Assembly for me, but not for thee. Disease-control measures are for them, not us. The thing is that some of ‘them’, some of the supposedly problematic people, warned you that this would happen. We warned you that sacrificing liberty at the altar of safety would harm public life and throttle the democratic right to register our concerns as a citizenry. That’s what happened on Saturday, just as we said it would.

 
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Blackleaf

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Katie Hopkins: Sarah Everard, leftists hypocrisy and the Stazi State U.K.​

 

Blackleaf

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The attack on the vigil for Sarah was a disgrace

For centuries human beings have held vigils for victims of alleged murders. Now it’s a crime to do so.

The attack on the vigil for Sarah was a disgrace

EMILY HILL

15th March 2021

Spiked

When human beings are murdered – brutally, evilly, inhumanly – human beings hold vigils. It’s one of the rights human beings have enjoyed for all the centuries before Covid came along and the government stripped us of many of our legal rights to behave like human beings. Holding a vigil should not be a political act. But that is what it has become in our democracy.

Sarah Everard was allegedly abducted from the part of London I have wandered about – mostly alone – for seven years. ‘There but for the grace of God go I’, is what I feel when I see the CCTV picture of her captured at the supermarket.

I do not understand why sex / gender intruded into the matter of holding a vigil for a human soul. But though Saturday night’s vigil was organised by an organisation called Reclaim the Streets, on Friday, not long after the body found in a builder’s bag was confirmed as Sarah’s (through the use of dental records), the vigil was declared illegal and the organisers cancelled it because they did not want to be held legally or financially responsible. They publicly requested that all those who wanted the streets to be reclaimed should donate money and shine a light on their doorstep at 9.30pm, rather than attend the vigil planned for 6pm on Saturday at Clapham Common bandstand.

At this point, my friend Nichi and I, who are forced to break the Covid law to see each other and have done so for months (just like Sarah, who was forced to break the Covid law to see her friend on the night she disappeared), became utterly and completely determined to go and lay our flowers, pay our private respects, and then report on what happened to the point of arrest. Speaking for myself, I do not fear men in Britain at all, but I do, very much, fear the British government and any member of the British police who is currently following orders. But neither of us wanted our fingerprints and DNA taken for the crime of doing something that should be legal, and we’re writers, so we have better ways of making a point.

We did ask several men – who are more physically powerful than us – to come and stand with us at the illegal vigil. That was Nichi’s idea, and I thought it an excellent one. When thousands of Rangers fans celebrated their title win this month, the Glaswegian police did next to nothing about it, one can only imagine because many of them were built like beauteous brick shithouses. It seemed perfectly obvious, in advance, that a park full of women built like Sarah Everard weren’t going to intimidate the London Metropolitan police.

(The one man I did recruit, also a journalist, admitted himself that he would ‘flunk a police physical’. But inside, our hearts all beat the same. And, to be honest, I am pretty disgusted by anyone who criticises the ‘tame’ males who turned out to an illegal vigil. That is not how any woman in the crowd on Saturday night after it turned ugly will have seen them – I assure you.)

My male friend and I walked from my home. It took a little longer than half an hour, and we saw all sorts of human beings with flowers – and dogs, and prams, and bicycles and all sorts of things – drift through Clapham. But veering off on a side street, we ran slap bang into a police van full of officers in hi-vis, which warned us what we were in for…

At a quarter to six, we were on the Common watching trickles of humans coming from every path leading to the bandstand and scattered all across the grass, standing still. In the bandstand, there was the beating of a drum; a helicopter was annoying in the sky, and the sun was setting on the horizon. Females vastly outnumbered males. But only three women seemed so unhappy with this that they left. But the Reclaim the Streets vigil had been cancelled. So it was illegal for every single one of us to be there.

It is impossible for us to verify our impression that police presence on the streets exacerbated the traffic, to the point that it reached a standstill and lots of people who wanted to be there for six were very late. All we know is that Nichi didn’t get to us until twenty to seven. By that point, I had laid my flowers and we were right in front of the bandstand trying to work out what was going on inside because it was impossible to hear from further out because the women inside had no loud hailers or speakers and were wearing face masks.

I have deliberately not researched the political affiliations of any of the women in the bandstand. If you’re interested, you’ll know already. All I want to report are the chants of the crowd in reaction to the women in the bandstand being dragged away by the police. At first, fresh supplies of women came up through the crowd and scaled the bandstand. But more and more police came until it became clear that the supply of women willing to be dragged off would run out long before the supply of police dragging them off did.

18.41 – ‘Arrest your own!’
18.42 – ‘Shame on you!’
18.43 – Boos in response to police siren.
18.44 – ‘Get off her.’
18.45 – Crowd asked to hold up their phones with the lights on; I am so short I ask my male friend to record footage of all the lights.
18.48 – Cries from those in the bandstand: ‘Fuck the police’, ‘let her go’, and screaming: ‘Let her speak.’
18.49 – A male voice is heard for the first time, making points about the police: ‘No justice, no peace.’
18.53 – ‘Hey mister, get your hands off my sister.’
18.55 – ‘Down with the dictatorship.’
18.57 – ‘Arrest your own.’
19.02 – Fires break out as the candles around the bandstand set alight the bouquets; flames are put out, lights blown out.
19.03 – Man’s voice: ‘Why don’t the police leave?’ Inaudible cries… ‘Police go home!’
19.04 – A cry of ‘…murder…’, the noise of police radios, and a chain of police forming forcibly. I notice a little boy has appeared beside me, chanting, with increasing confidence, ‘Let her speak, let her speak!’
19.05 – Boos from the crowd (because the woman was not allowed to speak), then, ‘Shame on you, shame on you!’. And louder: ‘POLICE GO HOME.’
19.06 – ‘POLICE GO HOME.’
19.07 – ‘Leave her alone’, ‘Let her speak’, ‘Police go home’.
19.08 – Booing.

At ten past, we became acutely aware that the police had encircled everyone in the crowd around the bandstand and we feared they were going to pick us all off and arrest us. There was no social distancing going on and even though coronavirus infection rates in the area are incredibly low, that doesn’t seem to influence the predicament we’re in with the government and these were officers of the law.

So we got out before that happened, and then understood that the encirclement was a clever trick – which anyone practiced in the art of attending illegal vigils for an allegedly murdered woman would recognise – to frighten faint hearts out of the crowd. Outside of where we had been encircled the atmosphere was bloody awful. And frankly – considering that a firearms officer from Scotland Yard’s elite parliamentary and diplomatic protection command has been charged with the murder of the victim for whom the illegal vigil was being held – I’m surprised it was not a damned sight worse.
 

Blackleaf

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Maybe I wanted the vigil to be about the specific circumstances pertaining to the alleged abduction and murder of Sarah Everard and maybe it wasn’t. Maybe it was a political protest about other things. But I think all peaceful protests, of any variety, are essential to democracy. When I consult my own soul, after the fact, I’m not the slightest bit confused as to why I was there. And I am glad I was there, because it was unbelievable to witness, first hand, the Met bust up a crowd of human beings who were saying all sorts of things that I cannot repeat for legal reasons alongside very determined cries of ‘fuck the police’ as woman after woman was dragged away.

It was hard for me to see what was going on because – as should be clear to you by now – I’m a physical coward. However, braver women did suggest I had missed the vision of several police officers pin a woman against a tree. Cards were handed around to women who were putting themselves in danger of arrest – it’s true – and very possibly these were anti-lockdown conspirators. But as far as I could tell, these women weren’t radicals. They seemed to have been radicalised due to the context of being overpowered by police officers. I’m not sure what happened to ‘serve and protect’, but it would appear to be as dead as chivalry.

On Twitter, people appeared to worry that the vigil was corrupted by lockdown sceptics; lockdown sceptics are disgusted that anyone cares about women at a vigil when they didn’t care about women at an anti-lockdown protest. And to be honest, this whole spectacle of divide and rule so disgusts me that in dark moments I wish I was dead of Covid already. Lockdown brings out your suicidal streak, if you have one.

At half past seven, Nichi and I were questioned by the police as to what we were doing, told that we were in breach of coronavirus restrictions, and had to leave. We told them it appeared to us that if they stopped arresting women, everyone would leave voluntarily. It was freezing cold and when approached I was jogging on the spot. It seemed pretty clear we weren’t going to achieve anything by staying and our phones were almost out of battery. If that means the revolution had to die (as a male anti-lockdown campaigner sneered beneath one of my Instagram posts), so be it. You try getting home without a map on your phone when you’re disorientated because you’re not quite sure what path you need to take out of a park which – in parts – lies in total darkness.

I don’t think the murder of Sarah Everard has anything to do with me at all – save feeling a human impulse to empathise and worry with those who love her and who must be going through hell. Sarah Everard, her family tells us, was ‘bright and beautiful – a wonderful daughter and sister. She was kind and thoughtful, caring and dependable. She always put others first and had the most amazing sense of humour. She was strong and principled and a shining example to us all. We are very proud of her and she brought so much joy to our lives.’

I bet you my soul that a soul like that would have laid flowers. Neither Covid, nor politics of any other form, should have interfered with human beings holding a vigil to honour Sarah Everard and to give the slightest bit of comfort to those who will miss her for the rest of what remains to them of their time on earth.

Emily Hill is author of the short-story collection, Bad Romance, and publishes at Substack: https://emilyhill.substack.com/

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Blackleaf

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Patsy Stevenson Is An Actress From Theatre 🎭 School 😳 Her PR Tour Continues C4 News Tonight 😂

 

B00Mer

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London murder case triggers fear about women's safety
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Kate Holton
Publishing date:Mar 11, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo.
Sarah Everard is pictured in this police handout photo. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /Metropolitan Police photo
Article content
LONDON — Women in Britain poured out their fears and anger over how unsafe they feel walking the streets after the disappearance of a woman in London and the arrest of a police officer on suspicion of her kidnap and murder.

Sarah Everard, 33, was last seen at 9:30 p.m. on March 3 as she walked home from a friend’s house in south London. Her image, smiling at the camera or caught on CCTV that evening, has been splashed across British newspapers all week.


Anxiety turned to grief after news late on Wednesday that police investigating Everard’s disappearance had found remains in a wood outside London, resulting in an outpouring of personal accounts by women of their own experiences and fears.

“The disappearance of Sarah and the absolute tragedy around that has really touched a nerve with a lot of women,” said Anna Birley, 31, one of the organizers of a planned “Reclaim These Streets” vigil to honor Everard and demand change.

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“We feel really angry that it’s an expectation put on women that we need to change our behavior to stay safe. The problem isn’t women, the problem is that women aren’t safe on our streets,” said Birley.

Women flooded social media with posts about the steps they take when out alone at night to keep safe, including clutching keys to use as a weapon and wearing trainers to help them run. Many raged at the violence against women that made them feel they had to take such measures.


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Others detailed a catalog of incidents of harassment by men in public over the decades since they were schoolgirls.

“These are so powerful because each and every woman can relate,” Home Secretary (interior minister) Priti Patel said. “Every woman should feel safe to walk on our streets without fear of harassment or violence.”


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Legislator Jess Phillips, the opposition Labour Party’s policy chief on domestic violence, read out in the chamber of the House of Commons the names of all 118 women murdered by men in the United Kingdom last year.

“The message that needs to be sent is that male violence is something that has to be tackled and challenged and the justice system and society has to wake up to that,” said Phillips.

The head of London’s police force, Cressida Dick, said she and her colleagues were “utterly appalled” at news that a police officer had been arrested in connection with Everard’s abduction, sparking a wave of shock and anger.

An undated handout picture released by the Metropolitan Police on March 10, 2021, shows CCTV footage of missing Sarah Everard on March 3, as she walked along the A205 Poynders Road, from the junction with Cavendish Road, in the direction of Tulse Hill in south London
An undated handout picture released by the Metropolitan Police on March 10, 2021, shows CCTV footage of missing Sarah Everard on March 3, as she walked along the A205 Poynders Road, from the junction with Cavendish Road, in the direction of Tulse Hill in south London PHOTO BY METROPOLITAN POLICE /AFP via Getty Images
Police on Thursday were given extra time to question the officer, whose job is to guard diplomatic buildings, on suspicion of kidnap, murder and indecent exposure.

A woman in her 30s, who media said was his wife, was also detained on suspicion of assisting an offender, but has since been released on police bail.

England’s police watchdog, the Independent Office for Police Conduct, said it had launched an investigation into the London police force’s handling of the case.


The arrested officer was reported to police on Feb. 28 over allegations of indecent exposure in a south London fast food restaurant, several days before Everard disappeared.

The watchdog also said it would look closer at how the suspect sustained head injuries that required hospital treatment, which police said occurred while he was alone in his cell.

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Dick sought to reassure women, saying it was “incredibly rare” for a woman to be abducted from the streets.

“But I completely understand that despite this, women in London and the wider public, particularly those in the area where Sarah went missing, will be worried and may well be feeling scared,” she said.

Although the remains have not yet been formally identified, Everard’s family paid tribute, saying their “beautiful daughter Sarah was taken from us and we are appealing for any information that will help to solve this terrible crime.”

“Sarah was bright and beautiful – a wonderful daughter and sister. She was kind and thoughtful, caring and dependable,” the family said in a statement.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he was shocked and deeply saddened by developments in the case.


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The “Reclaim These Streets” vigil will take place on Saturday in Clapham Common in southwest London, near where Everard was last seen.
View attachment 6858


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The face of evil..

He's lucky this young girl wasn't my sister or family, he wouldn't make it to prison..