Heritage: Tell us about your roots

researchok

Council Member
Jun 12, 2004
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The one 'who got away' was a Mclain.

A truly extraordinary woman.

Theres a great story there....
 

peapod

Hall of Fame Member
Jun 26, 2004
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pumpkin pie bungalow
Haggis what have you started here :D I should be working to, but I keep going back to check this thread. American voice I know what you mean about the photographs, I was lucky enough to find a relative that had a cache of them. Its very strange the effect they have on you. Twenty years ago they would not have had this effect. Researchok you must tell us about the the mclain that got away.
Haggis my fraser uncles do not like the mention of "Campbell" I seem to recall them calling them the "black campbells" do you know the story behind this?
 

Haggis McBagpipe

Walks on Forum Water
Jun 11, 2004
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Victoria, B.C.
peapod said:
Haggis what have you started here :D I should be working to, but I keep going back to check this thread. American voice I know what you mean about the photographs, I was lucky enough to find a relative that had a cache of them. Its very strange the effect they have on you. Twenty years ago they would not have had this effect. Researchok you must tell us about the the mclain that got away.
Haggis my fraser uncles do not like the mention of "Campbell" I seem to recall them calling them the "black campbells" do you know the story behind this?

The dreaded Campbell name! I grew up hearing the same thing. The Campbells laid waste to many clans, they were a brutal gang with no respect for other clans, and traitorous to boot. Many of the surnames such as Black, White, Green, and others were taken by the Lamonts and other clans in order to hide from the brutality of the Campbells. I wish I did have more details, but this is recalled from when I was a child, tales my father told me.
 

Numure

Council Member
Apr 30, 2004
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Montréal, Québec
Pictou County is located on the central north shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The first settlers arrived from Philadelphia on June 10, 1767 on the brigantine Betsey. In September, 1773 about 200 immigrants arrived from Scotland on the Hector. Much of the culture of the County today can be attributed to these Scottish immigrants.

Many soldiers of the 82nd Hamilton Regiment began settling in Pictou County in the fall of 1783 after peace was made with the United States.

From 1767 to 1849, the great period of British emigration; approximately 120 ships arrived in Pictou County carrying immigrants from Scotland, England and Ireland.


This is grosly ridiculous. They wernt the first settlers. The Acadiens we're(French). They we're there since 1590 or so... But we all know what happen when the British took over....
 

researchok

Council Member
Jun 12, 2004
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Numure, I think he was referring to the Scots.

More on the Mclain that got away later, I promise.
 

Diamond Sun

Council Member
Jun 11, 2004
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Within arms reach of the new baby..
Wow, you all know so much about your family tree. I know virtually nothing. My dad's family hails from Switzerland and my mom's from Scotland and Sweeden. My dad is first generation Canadian, my mom second. Does that make me second and a half?
 

peapod

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Jun 26, 2004
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Diamond sun there is now a database at the national archives which I think is online and you would be able to see what ship they came on, and for the price of photo-copying and postage you would be able to records, just a thought if you are interested.
 

American Voice

Council Member
Jun 4, 2004
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Researchok (Rok, for short?), you mention that you live in North Carolina. I remember one of my favorite old radio shows: Fiona Ritchie's "Thistle and Shamrock," produced at WFAE, at UNC Charlotte. The Squirrel Nut Zippers hail from down that way, too.

Anyway, what I wanted to ask: were your family there in NC at the time of the Civil War? A great grandfather of mine was with the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment. On the morning of September 15, 1862, his brigade were deployed opposite an infantry brigade from North Carolina, at a place called Fox's Gap.
 

researchok

Council Member
Jun 12, 2004
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Sorry, AV-- I'm just another Canadian export from Montreal.

I'm in Raleigh now-- really, a beautiful city.

As for local programming, I used to watch the fishing shows-- till I realized they all end in the same way.

They let the fish go.

Took all the mystery out of it.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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I'm British, so God knows what I am. I suppose a mixture of Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, Norman, Viking, a smidgin of Roman, and maybe one or two other things.
 

Jersay

House Member
Dec 1, 2005
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Independent Palestine
I am French, but my father comes from a British background, his father moved to Canada from England. My father and I have traced the roots of the family back to Scandanvia around the Viking or what I consider the Norman times in 900 A.D

There is actually a village named after a descendent of mine in England from that time period so we kind of ponder if it was named for a Norman warrior or ruler of that specific area that called the village after himself.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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I'm Scottish on my mother's side and English on my father's side but still 100% British. Well, I might be about 95% British because my grandfather's grandparents came from the Isle of man, a Celtic island off the Northern coast of England. It isn't a part of the UK but is a UK dependency.

My dad is, at this moment, tracing back his family tree. He discovered that my great-great-great-great grandfather was born in 1808, just 3 years after the Battle of Trafalgar. That's the furthest back in time he has got to so far. I want him to try and go further back to see if I have an ancestor who actually fought in the Battle of Trafalgar. My grandad's grandmother started work in a cotton mill when she was 12 years old.
 

Martin Le Acadien

Electoral Member
Sep 29, 2004
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Province perdue du Canada, Louisian
My Father's Family came to Virginia in 1630's as indentured servants and spread out from there. I am descended from 2 signers of the Declaration of Independence (Lee family of Virginia) which one of my ancestors was Zachory Taylor who carried out Manifest Destiny to the Max! Quite interesting bunch of cousins in that side of the tree.

My mother's family came from around Cheticamp, NS to South Louisiana in the Grand Derangement, the Family name of Pitre et Mailet is quite prominent in those areas. My ancestor, Felix Pitre had a farm and 100 acres of good land in Nova Scotia which is now a shopping mall of all things!!!!

My wife is descended from Claude (dit Grivois) Guidry et Margarite Petitpas who settled around Lahave which is now known as Lunenberg, Nova Scotia. The old Acadien Cemetary is where the couple was buried and is a national Canadian Historic site! The Family tree of the Guidrys is quite interesting in itself and has spread throughout Canada, the Carribbean, France and the US! Our cousines are everywhere. Quite prolific my wife's family and she has carried on the tradition! One of our daughters is dating a young man from Dieppe, NB and a distant cousin on my mohter's side! (Try about 8 times removed).
 

Nosferax

Nominee Member
My family moved to Nouvelle France during the French Revolution (from Bretagne). Originaly of jewish origine (Menardi) we droped the "i" and change the "e" for a "é" after converting to catholicism.

Of course the Menardi where originaly from Spain and fled to France during the inquisition.

The only thing I know from my mother side (Desjardins) is that one of her ancestor was hanged for gambling debt in New Orleans.