CERN Wants to Build a Bigger, Badder Particle Collider

socratus

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Dec 10, 2008
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CERN Wants to Build a Bigger, Badder Particle Collider
/By: John Perritano/
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Cern aims to build €22bn collider to unlock secrets of universe.
The first accelerator based on the principle of multiple acceleration was the cyclotron,
invented by Ernest Lawrence in 1930 (Nobel Prize 1939).
Since then, 1000 new particles have been discovered. Will new subatomic particles
close the gaps in our misunderstanding of the quantum world?
 

spaminator

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CERN Wants to Build a Bigger, Badder Particle Collider
/By: John Perritano/
-----
Cern aims to build €22bn collider to unlock secrets of universe.
The first accelerator based on the principle of multiple acceleration was the cyclotron,
invented by Ernest Lawrence in 1930 (Nobel Prize 1939).
Since then, 1000 new particles have been discovered. Will new subatomic particles
close the gaps in our misunderstanding of the quantum world?
there is conCERN that the colliders could create a black hole. 💡 :eek: :(
 
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socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
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www.worldnpa.org
The Uncertain Future of Particle Physics
Ten years in, the Large Hadron Collider has failed to deliver the exciting discoveries that scientists promised.
Jan. 23, 2019
/By Sabine Hossenfelder/
The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest particle accelerator.
It’s a 16-mile-long underground ring, located at CERN in Geneva, in which protons collide
at almost the speed of light. With a $5 billion price tag and a $1 billion annual operation cost,
the L.H.C. is the most expensive instrument ever built — and that’s even though it reuses
the tunnel of an earlier collider.

Last week, CERN unveiled plans to build an accelerator that is larger
and far more powerful than the L.H.C. — and would cost over $10 billion.

I used to be a particle physicist. For my Ph.D. thesis, I did L.H.C. predictions,
and while I have stopped working in the field, I still believe that slamming particles
into one another is the most promising route to understanding what matter is made of
and how it holds together. But $10 billion is a hefty price tag. And I’m not sure it’s worth it.

In 2012, experiments at the L.H.C. confirmed the discovery of the Higgs boson —
a prediction that dates back to the 1960s — and it remains the only discovery made at the L.H.C.
Particle physicists are quick to emphasize that they have learned other things:
For example,
they now have better knowledge about the structure of the proton, and they’ve seen new
(albeit unstable) composite particles. But let’s be honest: It’s disappointing.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/23/opin ... lider.html
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1- "For example, they now have better knowledge about the structure of the proton, . . ."
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/23/opin ... lider.html

A proton is made up of the Quark family. The quark family of particles consists of:
up, down, top, bottom, charm and strange particles + antiquarks + tetraquark + pentaquark + leptoquark (?) + . . .
2- Book, "Fundamentals": "The discovery of the Higgs particle was announced on July 4, 2012." . . .
" The lifetime of a Higgs particle is about 10^-22 seconds, or a tenth of trillionth of a billionth of a seconds."
/page 177, by Frank Wilczek/.
The Higgs boson is a spin-zero particle. Spinless particles are unstable and cannot be fundamental particles.
 

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socratus

socratus
Dec 10, 2008
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“Scientific vocabulary can be so weird. The Large Hadron Collider at CERN
has just recorded an example of a subatomic particle called the anti-beauty quark.
Could it be that ugly people now have something tangible to blame?”
― Michael Quinion