Alec Baldwin fired shot that killed one, wounded another on film set

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Prosecutors weigh second gun analysis in fatal shooting of cinematographer by Alec Baldwin
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Morgan Lee
Published Aug 15, 2023 • 4 minute read
Prosecutors have received a second expert analysis of the revolver fired in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by Alec Baldwin on the set of a Western film in New Mexico, as they weigh whether to refile charges against the actor.
Prosecutors have received a second expert analysis of the revolver fired in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by Alec Baldwin on the set of a Western film in New Mexico, as they weigh whether to refile charges against the actor.
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Prosecutors have received a second expert analysis of the revolver fired in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by Alec Baldwin on the set of a Western film in New Mexico, as they weigh whether to refile charges against the actor.


Baldwin has said the gun fired accidentally after he followed instructions to point it toward cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, who was behind the camera in rehearsal. Baldwin said he pulled back the hammer — but not the trigger — and the gun fired, fatally wounding Hutchins on Oct. 21, 2021, at a movie ranch on the outskirts of Santa Fe.


Special prosecutors dismissed an involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin in April, saying they were informed the gun might have been modified before the shooting and malfunctioned. They commissioned a new analysis of the gun, along with other weapons and ammunition from the set of the movie, “Rust,” which moved filming from New Mexico to Montana.

The new gun analysis from experts in ballistics and forensic testing based in Arizona and New Mexico relied on replacement parts to reassemble the gun fired by Baldwin — after parts of the pistol were broken during earlier testing by the FBI. The new report examines the gun and markings it left on a spent cartridge to conclude that the trigger had to have been pulled or depressed.


“Although Alec Baldwin repeatedly denies pulling the trigger, given the tests, findings and observations reported here, the trigger had to be pulled or depressed sufficiently to release the fully cocked or retracted hammer of the evidence revolver,” states the analysis led by Lucien Haag of Forensic Science Services in Arizona.

An attorney for Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, the weapons supervisor on the movie set, disclosed the report in a court filing Tuesday. Gutierrez-Reed has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter and evidence tampering in the case. Her trial is scheduled to begin in December.

Defense attorneys for Baldwin did not immediately reply to an email Tuesday seeking comment on the gun analysis. A publicist declined comment.


Special prosecutor Kari Morrissey said in an email Tuesday that a formal announcement on whether to refile any charges against Baldwin is forthcoming but didn’t say how soon.

In an early June court filing, prosecutors gave themselves 60 days to renew a case against Baldwin, contingent on a determination that the gun did not malfunction.

“A possible malfunction of the gun significantly effects causation with regard to Baldwin,” they wrote.

Authorities have not specified exactly how live ammunition found its way on set and into the .45-caliber revolver made by an Italian company that specializes in 19th century reproductions.

The company Rust Movie Productions has paid a $100,000 fine to state workplace safety regulators following a scathing narrative of safety failures in violation of standard industry protocols, including testimony that production managers took limited or no action to address two misfires on set before the fatal shooting.


An August FBI report on the agency’s analysis of the gun found that, as is common with firearms of that design, it could go off without pulling the trigger if force was applied to an uncocked hammer — such as by dropping the weapon.

The only way the testers could get it to fire was by striking the gun with a mallet while the hammer was down and resting on the cartridge, or by pulling the trigger while it was fully cocked. The gun eventually broke during the testing.

In Tuesday’s court filing, Gutierrez-Reed’s attorneys asked for new safeguards at trial to ensure the movie armorer can’t be convicted if negligence by any other person was the only significant cause of death or changed the course of events in unforeseeable ways.


Morrissey criticized the defense’s request for special jury instructions as premature and a bid for media attention.

Defense attorneys said they plan to present evidence that Gutierrez-Reed asked assistant director and safety coordinator David Halls to call her back into rehearsal if Baldwin was going to use the gun. She said that didn’t happen before Hutchins was shot.

In March, Halls pleaded no contest to a conviction for unsafe handling of a firearm and received a suspended sentence of six months of probation. He agreed to cooperate in the investigation of the shooting that also wounded director Joel Souza.

Jason Bowles, an attorney for Gutierrez-Reed, said the new analysis of the gun that was fired at Hutchins “supports the idea that there was no modification” to the gun prior to the fatal shooting and that it fired as designed when broken parts were replaced.



The new firearms report contains images of the broken, disassembled gun as delivered in July, along with images taken from a video of Baldwin in rehearsal prior to the fatal shooting, with his finger apparently resting on the trigger of the pistol.

“From an examination of the fired cartridge case and the operationally restored evidence revolver, this fatal incident was the consequence of the hammer being manually retracted to its fully rearward and cocked position followed, at some point, by the pull or rearward depression of the trigger,” the report from Haag states. “The only conceivable alternative to the foregoing would be a situation in which the trigger was already pulled or held rearward while retracting the hammer to its full cock position.”
 

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Trial scheduled for Rust armourer after fatal shooting of cinematographer
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Aug 21, 2023 • 1 minute read
Prosecutors have received a second expert analysis of the revolver fired in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by Alec Baldwin on the set of a Western film in New Mexico, as they weigh whether to refile charges against the actor.
Prosecutors have received a second expert analysis of the revolver fired in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by Alec Baldwin on the set of a Western film in New Mexico, as they weigh whether to refile charges against the actor.
SANTA FE, N.M. — A New Mexico judge has set a 2024 starting date for the trial of movie armourer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by actor Alec Baldwin during a rehearsal on the set of a western film.


State district court Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer on Monday scheduled the trial to run from Feb. 21 through March 6 in Santa Fe, N.M. The first day begins with jury selection.


Gutierrez-Reed has pleaded not guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter and evidence tampering in the fatal shooting of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during a rehearsal on the set of Rust on Oct. 21, 2021.



An attorney for Gutierrez-Reed has described the fatal shooting as a tragic accident and said the film’s armourer committed no crime. Gutierrez-Reed is the sole criminal defendant.

Prosecutors are weighing whether to refile a charge against Baldwin after receiving a new analysis of the gun fired at Hutchins. Special prosecutors dismissed an involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin in April, saying they were informed the gun might have been modified before the shooting and malfunctioned.


Baldwin has said he pulled back the hammer — but not the trigger — and the gun fired, fatally wounding Hutchins and injuring director Joel Souza.

In March, Rust assistant director and safety co-ordinator David Halls pleaded no contest to a conviction for unsafe handling of a firearm and received a suspended sentence of six months of probation. He agreed to co-operate in the investigation of the shooting.

Defence attorneys said they plan to present evidence that Gutierrez-Reed asked Halls to call her back into rehearsal if Baldwin planned to use the gun. They said that didn’t happen before Hutchins was shot.

The filming of Rust resumed this year in Montana under an agreement with the cinematographer’s widower, Matthew Hutchins, that made him an executive producer.
 

bill barilko

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Alec Baldwin to be recharged with involuntary manslaughter in Rust shooting​

Actor’s case in connection with fatal film shooting in 2021 will reportedly be brought before grand jury in mid-November

New Mexico prosecutors intend to recharge actor Alec Baldwin with involuntary manslaughter in connection with the fatal 2021 Rust shooting, NBC News reported on Tuesday, citing two sources familiar with the matter.

Baldwin’s case will be brought before a grand jury in mid-November, the report added.


Kari Morrissey, a special prosecutor on the case, and a lawyer representing Baldwin both did not immediately respond to requests for comment from Reuters.


Baldwin was originally charged with involuntary manslaughter for the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins in October 2021. She died when a revolver Baldwin was rehearsing with fired a live round that passed through her and injured director Joel Souza.

Baldwin has said he is not responsible for Hutchins’ death and he did not pull the trigger.

Prosecutors dismissed charges against Baldwin in April after new evidence emerged that the gun he used may have been modified, allowing it to fire without the trigger being pulled.

Morrissey said at the time that if new testing of the gun showed it was working they would recharge Baldwin.

Subsequent testing of the gun by an independent expert showed it would not fire unless the trigger was pulled, confirming previous FBI testing on the reproduction long Colt .45 revolver.
 

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Family of Marine killed in Afghanistan fails to win lawsuit against Alec Baldwin
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Mead Gruver
Published Nov 30, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Alec Baldwin didn’t have to pay anything to resolve a $25 million lawsuit filed by family members of a Marine killed in Afghanistan after the actor chastised them on social media over the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, Baldwin’s attorney said.


U.S. Southern District of New York Judge Edgardo Ramos in August dismissed the lawsuit sought by the wife and sisters of Lance Cpl. Rylee McCollum, of Jackson, Wyoming, When the McCollum family didn’t file an amended lawsuit as Ramos invited to do before a September deadline, the judge closed the case in October.


Baldwin paid nothing to resolve the case, his attorney Luke Nikas said Wednesday in an email to The Associated Press.

The case has seen no activity since, according to court documents. Lawyers for both sides, including McCollum family attorney Dennis Postiglione, did not comment further on the case when contacted by email Thursday. Reached by email Wednesday, Postiglione declined to comment and said the McCollum family would not comment.


Rylee McCollum and 12 other Marines were killed in a suicide bombing at the Kabul airport in the last days of the U.S. war in Afghanistan in 2021. Baldwin sent the family a $5,000 cheque to help in the aftermath.

The lawsuit, filed initially in Wyoming and then New York, alleged Baldwin exposed the family to a flood of social media hatred in 2022 by claiming on Instagram that Roice McCollum was an “insurrectionist” for attending former President Donald Trump’s Jan. 6, 2021, rally in Washington, D.C., that preceded the insurrection that day.

Roice McCollum protested peacefully and legally, was not among those who stormed the U.S. Capitol, and never was arrested or charged after being interviewed by the FBI, according to the lawsuit.


Even so, she was a “limited public figure” under the law by talking about her brother’s death in the news media and by engaging with Baldwin, a well-known celebrity, on social media, Ramos ruled in dismissing the lawsuit.

To prove her case as a limited public figure, McCollum needed to show that Baldwin acted with malice toward her. She did not, so Baldwin’s comments were protected under his free-speech rights, Ramos ruled.

The lawsuit was filed as Baldwin faced legal peril for the death of a cinematographer on a New Mexico movie set in 2021. Baldwin was pointing a gun when it went off, killing Halyna Hutchins and wounding director Joel Souza.

Special prosecutors initially dismissed an involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin but now seek to recharge the actor after presenting new information to a grand jury.
 

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Movie armourer in ’Rust’ fatal shooting pleads not guilty to unrelated gun charge
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Dec 01, 2023 • 1 minute read

SANTA FE, N.M. — The weapons supervisor on the film set where Alec Baldwin shot and killed a cinematographer in 2021 waived her arraignment in a separate case, pleading not guilty to a charge of carrying a gun into a Santa Fe bar.


Hannah Gutierrez-Reed had been set to appear in court next week on the charge, but a state courts spokesperson said Friday that her attorneys opted instead to waive her appearance. Her attorneys did not immediately respond to a message that The Associated Press left Friday seeking comment.


The firearm charge against Gutierrez-Reed stems from an incident days before she was hired to work as the armourer on “Rust.” According to court records, a witness told authorities that she was carrying a gun when she walked into a bar in downtown Santa Fe.

Gutierrez-Reed also is awaiting trial on charges of involuntary manslaughter and evidence tampering stemming from the fatal shooting of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during a rehearsal on the “Rust” movie set on Oct. 21, 2021.


As part of their preparation for trial, special prosecutors have issued subpoenas for documents from producers of “Rust” and any audio and video recordings held by a Los Angeles film production company that might include Baldwin on the set or his comments about the film elsewhere.

Legal experts have said prosecutors could repurpose documents or records uncovered in case against Gutierrez-Reed if a grand jury were to indict Baldwin.

Prosecutors have said they will present evidence to a grand jury against Baldwin in the fatal set shooting, but it’s unclear when that might happen. It’s a secretive process without public access, as prosecutors present evidence and witnesses possibly testify without a cross-examination or immediate vetting by defence counsel.
 

bill barilko

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Family of Marine killed in Afghanistan fails to win lawsuit against Alec Baldwin

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Alec Baldwin didn’t have to pay anything to resolve a $25 million lawsuit filed by family members of a Marine killed in Afghanistan after the actor chastised them on social media over the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, Baldwin’s attorney said. Baldwin paid nothing to resolve the case, his attorney Luke Nikas said Wednesday in an email to The Associated Press.
Oh that is a lie-he paid lawyers ten of thousands that's how the system works.
 
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spaminator

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Grand jury indicts Alec Baldwin in fatal shooting of cinematographer on movie set in New Mexico
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Morgan Lee
Published Jan 19, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read

SANTA FE, N.M. — A grand jury indicted Alec Baldwin on Friday on an involuntary manslaughter charge in a 2021 fatal shooting during a rehearsal on a movie set in New Mexico, reviving a dormant case against the actor.


Special prosecutors brought the case before a grand jury in Santa Fe this week, months after receiving a new analysis of the gun that was used. They declined to answer questions after spending about a day and a half presenting their case to the grand jury.


Defence attorneys for Baldwin indicated they’ll fight the charge.

“We look forward to our day in court,” said Luke Nikas and Alex Spiro, defence attorneys for Baldwin, in an email.

While the proceeding is shrouded in secrecy, two of the witnesses seen at the courthouse included crew members — one who was present when the fatal shot was fired and another who had walked off the set the day before due to safety concerns.

Baldwin, the lead actor and a co-producer on the Western movie “Rust,” was pointing a gun at cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during a rehearsal on a movie set outside Santa Fe in October 2021 when the gun went off, killing her and wounding director Joel Souza.


Baldwin has said he pulled back the hammer, but not the trigger, and the gun fired.

The charge has again put Baldwin in legal trouble and created the possibility of prison time for an actor who has been a TV and movie mainstay for nearly 40 years, with roles in the early blockbuster “The Hunt for Red October,” Martin Scorsese’s “The Departed” and the sitcom “30 Rock.”

The indictment provides prosecutors with two alternative standards for pursuing an involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin in the death of Hutchins. One would be based on negligent use of a firearm, and the other alleges felony misconduct “with the total disregard or indifference for the safety of others.”

Judges recently agreed to put on hold several civil lawsuits seeking compensation from Baldwin and producers of “Rust” after prosecutors said they would present their case to a grand jury. Plaintiffs in those suits include members of the film crew.


Los Angeles-based attorney Gloria Allred, who is representing the slain cinematographer’s parents and younger sister in a civil case, said Friday that her clients have been seeking the truth about what happened the day Hutchins was killed and will be looking forward to Baldwin’s trial.

Neama Rahmani, a former federal prosecutor and president of the West Coast Trial Lawyers firm in Los Angeles, pointed to previous missteps by prosecutors, saying they will need to do more than present ballistics evidence to make a case that Baldwin had a broader responsibility and legal duty when it came to handling the gun on the set.

Special prosecutors dismissed an involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin in April, saying they were informed the gun might have been modified before the shooting and malfunctioned. They later pivoted and began weighing whether to refile a charge against Baldwin after receiving a new analysis of the gun.


The analysis from experts in ballistics and forensic testing relied on replacement parts to reassemble the gun fired by Baldwin, after parts of the pistol were broken during testing by the FBI. The report examined the gun and markings it left on a spent cartridge to conclude that the trigger had to have been pulled or depressed.

The analysis led by Lucien Haag of Forensic Science Services in Arizona stated that although Baldwin repeatedly denied pulling the trigger, “given the tests, findings and observations reported here, the trigger had to be pulled or depressed sufficiently to release the fully cocked or retracted hammer of the evidence revolver.”

The weapons supervisor on the movie set, Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter and evidence tampering in the case. Her trial is scheduled to begin in February.


“Rust” assistant director and safety coordinator David Halls pleaded no contest to unsafe handling of a firearm last March and received a suspended sentence of six months of probation. He agreed to cooperate in the investigation of the shooting.

An earlier FBI report on the agency’s analysis of the gun found that, as is common with firearms of that design, it could go off without pulling the trigger if force was applied to an uncocked hammer, such as by dropping the weapon.

The only way the testers could get it to fire was by striking the gun with a mallet while the hammer was down and resting on the cartridge, or by pulling the trigger while it was fully cocked. The gun eventually broke during testing.


The 2021 shooting resulted in a series of civil lawsuits, including wrongful death claims filed by members of Hutchins’ family, centred on accusations that the defendants were lax with safety standards. Baldwin and other defendants have disputed those allegations.

The Rust Movie Productions company has paid a $100,000 fine to state workplace safety regulators after a scathing narrative of failures in violation of standard industry protocols, including testimony that production managers took limited or no action to address two misfires on set before the fatal shooting.

The filming of “Rust” resumed last year in Montana, under an agreement with the cinematographer’s widower, Matthew Hutchins, that made him an executive producer.

— Associated Press journalist Susan Montoya Bryan reported from Albuquerque.
 

55Mercury

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if they make it too much like watching paint dry, no one's gonna pay to see the show!
 

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Grand jury indictment against Alec Baldwin opens two paths for prosecutors
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Morgan Lee
Published Jan 20, 2024 • 4 minute read

SANTA FE, N.M. — Alec Baldwin once again is staring down a felony involuntary manslaughter charge after a grand jury indicted the actor in connection with the fatal 2021 shooting of a cinematographer on the set of a Western movie in New Mexico.


The lead actor and a co-producer on “Rust,” Baldwin pointed a gun at cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during rehearsal on a movie set outside Santa Fe when the gun went off, killing her and wounding director Joel Souza.


A new analysis of the gun opened the way for prosecutors to reboot the case, after dismissing an involuntary manslaughter charge last year. A new one-page indictment delivered by the grand jury Friday alleges Baldwin caused Hutchins’ death — either by negligence or “total disregard or indifference” for safety.

Defense attorneys for Baldwin indicate they’ll fight the charge, which carries a potential prison sentence of up to 18 months.

Here are some things to know about the case.

Next steps
Baldwin can enter a formal plea with or without a court arraignment, setting in motion preparations for trial.


The indictment provides prosecutors with two alternative standards for the felony involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin. One would be based on the negligent use of a firearm.

Baldwin has said he pulled back the gun’s hammer, but not the trigger, and the weapon fired. But a recent analysis of the gun used by Baldwin from Lucien and Michael Haag of Forensic Science Services in Arizona concluded that “the trigger had to be pulled or depressed sufficiently to release the fully cocked or retracted hammer of the evidence revolver.” Michael Haag testified to the grand jury this week as a witness, according to the new indictment.

An earlier FBI report on the agency’s analysis of the gun found that, as is common with firearms of that design, it could go off without pulling the trigger if force was applied to an uncocked hammer — such as by dropping the weapon. The gun eventually broke during testing.


A second alternative for prosecutors is to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Baldwin caused the death of Hutchins without due caution or “circumspection,” also defined as “an act committed with total disregard or indifference for the safety of others.”

Baldwin as co-producer
Prosecutors declined to answer questions Friday after spending about a day and a half presenting their case to the grand jury.

Santa Fe-based defense attorney and former prosecutor John Day, who is not connected to the case, believes the indictment gives prosecutors a possible opportunity to address Baldwin’s safety obligations as a co-producer.

“We don’t know exactly what their theory is,” Day said. “It could be that they’re including his role as basically CEO of the production … not having a safe workplace and somebody dies and you’re at the top of the pyramid.”


The company Rust Movie Productions has paid a $100,000 fine to state workplace safety regulators following a scathing narrative of safety failures in violation of standard industry protocols, including testimony that production managers took limited or no action to address two misfires on set before the fatal shooting.

Two related trials
Separately, special prosecutors Kari Morrissey and Jason Lewis are preparing for a February trial against “Rust” armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, who has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter and evidence tampering in the case.

That trial is likely to proceed independently — and could give Baldwin’s attorneys insights into prosecution strategies and testimony from key witnesses who are likely to also testify in proceedings against Baldwin.


“His attorneys will certainly be watching the armorer’s trial closely,” said Los Angeles-based entertainment litigator and defense attorney Kate Mangels, who is not involved in the case. “It could offer a preview of the prosecution’s approach and potential witness testimony.”

Baldwin’s case was assigned to Santa Fe-based state District Court Judge T. Glenn Ellington, a specialist in criminal cases. The Gutierrez-Reed case is overseen by a different judge.

“We look forward to our day in court,” said Luke Nikas and Alex Spiro, defense attorneys for Baldwin.

Potential witnesses
Two of the witnesses seen at the courthouse included crew members _ one who was present when the fatal shot was fired and another who had walked off the set the day before due to safety concerns.


“Rust” assistant director and safety coordinator David Halls pleaded no contest to unsafe handling of a firearm last March and received a suspended sentence of six months of probation. He agreed to cooperate in the shooting investigation.

New court filings Friday indicate that “Rust” prop master Sarah Zachry has signed an agreement to cooperate with special prosecutors in return for leniency. Zachry worked closely to secure guns and ammunition on set with Gutierrez-Reed.

Mangels said a grand jury indictment is by no means an assurance that prosecutors will prevail at trial.

“Just getting an indictment from a grand jury in no way means the prosecution has a slam dunk case or even a strong case,” she said.
 

bill barilko

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Classic definition of a swine.​

Alec Baldwin pleads not guilty to new involuntary manslaughter charge over Halyna Hutchins's Rust shooting​

31st January 2024, 04:52 PST
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By Patrick JacksonBBC News
Getty Images Alec Baldwin is seen on December 14, 2023 in New York City
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Alec Baldwin in New York City last month
Hollywood actor Alec Baldwin has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter over the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

Ms Hutchins was shot dead on the set of Rust, a forthcoming Western filmed near Santa Fe in New Mexico in October 2021.

Mr Baldwin, 65, had been practicing firing a pistol for a scene.

Similar charges were dropped in April, just two weeks before he was due to go on trial, but New Mexico prosecutors say there is new forensic evidence.

The actor entered the not guilty plea in a court filing on Wednesday, a day before a scheduled virtual court appearance in a Santa Fe court, which will now not take place.

He was charged on 19 January in New Mexico after local prosecutors said "additional facts" had emerged from forensic tests on the weapon used in the shooting, in which director Joel Souza was also wounded.


Getty Images Halyna Hutchins
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Halyna Hutchins was a "wonderful mother, first and foremost", a former colleague told the BBC
Mr Baldwin has maintained he did not pull the trigger of the Colt .45 pistol and only drew back its hammer.

He has also argued he is not at fault for Ms Hutchins' death because he did not know the weapon contained live rounds and because no live ammunition was supposed to be on set.

But special prosecutors in New Mexico said in October that they had commissioned forensic experts to reconstruct the weapon, after it had been broken during FBI testing.

They said doing so had revealed that the incident could only have taken place if the trigger had been pulled.

"Although Alec Baldwin repeatedly denies pulling the trigger, given the tests, findings and observations reported here, the trigger had to be pulled or depressed sufficiently to release the fully cocked or retracted hammer of the evidence revolver," their report concluded.

The actor - who has expressed "shock and sadness" at Ms Hutchins' death - said in recent court filings that he had struggled to find acting work since the incident.


When prosecutors dropped involuntary manslaughter charges in April they warned that they could be refiled as investigations continued.
 

Retired_Can_Soldier

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I'm pretty sure Baldwin has never been in an organization that has an SOP on handling firearms.

I was a firearms instructor. The first thing you teach people is to clear a weapon when they pick it up. Were the actors not trained on the weapons they'd be handling? Hell that SOP goes back to when I was a kid. The warning we got from everyone was: Always treat a weapon as if it is loaded. If Baldwin went through a training course he should have known that. If he didn't, WTF?
 

Tecumsehsbones

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I was a firearms instructor. The first thing you teach people is to clear a weapon when they pick it up. Were the actors not trained on the weapons they'd be handling? Hell that SOP goes back to when I was a kid. The warning we got from everyone was: Always treat a weapon as if it is loaded. If Baldwin went through a training course he should have known that. If he didn't, WTF?
I know, and probably not.

I think Baldwin has a case. I agree with you completely. If you clear a weapon in front of my eyes, then hand it to me, the first thing I'll do is clear it. But I don't think Baldwin was ever a soldier, and to the untrained, it might seem reasonable that an armorer on a movie set wouldn't be putting live rounds in a prop weapon. That's part of the armorer's job. As far as I'm concerned, the most culpable person in this scenario is the armorer.
 
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