White House to unveil dire climate warning in new report


mentalfloss
+1
#1
White House to unveil dire climate warning in new report

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration will release an updated report on Tuesday showing how climate change touches every part of the country, as the administration seeks to convince the American public on the need for a crackdown on carbon pollution.

Some environmental and public health groups expect the U.S. National Climate Assessment to be a "game changer" in the administration's efforts to address climate change.

The extensive report will update a January 2013 draft, which detailed how consequences of climate change are hitting on several fronts, including health, infrastructure, water supply, agriculture and especially more frequent severe weather.

Since then, the report was reviewed by the National Academies of Sciences and attracted more than 4,000 public comments.

The advisory committee behind the report was established by the U.S. Department of Commerce to integrate federal research on environmental change and its implications for society. It made two earlier assessments, in 2000 and 2009.

Thirteen departments and agencies, from the Agriculture Department to NASA, are part of the committee, which also includes academics, businesses, non-profit organizations and others. More than 240 scientists contributed to the report.

"We expect it will paint a huge amount of practical, usable knowledge that state and local decision-makers can take advantage of as they plan on or for the impacts of climate change and work to make their communities more resilient," John Podesta, an adviser to President Barack Obama, said on Monday.

Podesta said the administration hopes that conveying the warnings contained in the report can help the administration implement the president's Climate Action Plan, which was unveiled in June 2013 and focuses on executive actions Obama can use to rein in polluters.

As part of that outreach Obama will speak with several local and nationally known meteorologists on Tuesday, including the NBC Today Show's Al Roker.

Among the key findings in the draft report expected to be reiterated are that the past decade was the country's warmest on record, and that some extreme weather events, such as prolonged droughts and heavier downpours, have increased.

Extreme weather events and other impacts of climate change also increase the risk of disease transmission and even mental health problems, the 2013 draft said.

Also expected to be featured is an ongoing sea-level rise, which increases the risk of erosion and storm surge damage and raises the stakes for the nearly 5 million Americans who live within four feet of the local high-tide level.

Vicki Arroyo, executive director of the Georgetown Climate Center of Georgetown University, said the climate assessment will focus on solutions not just dire warnings.

"You really can't just provide a report that paints this dark picture of all these impacts. You have to couple it with a message of what our government can do about it, what you can do about it and what our communities can do," she said.

White House to unveil dire climate warning in new report (external - login to view)
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+4
#2  Top Rated Post
You really get your jollies locking horns with deniers, don't you. I can't be bothered with meatheads. Life is too short.
 
petros
+1
#3
GE and the NewEngland NG concerns aren't giving up on your stupidity I see.
 
mentalfloss
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

You really get your jollies locking horns with deniers, don't you. I can't be bothered with meatheads. Life is too short.

It would be nice if this wasn't such a big problem for them so there would be less headache.
 
petros
+1
#5
As you both sit being a part of the alleged problem consuming and producing nothing.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#6
A report!

Goodness gracious... A 'new' report!
 
Nuggler
+2
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

A 'new' report!

Goodness gracious... A report!


Yes, some more words. What would be do without them.
Let's start the "Church of words and reports"
Jesus wants us to, I can feel it.
Goodness gracious sort of sums it up Capt. well done.
 
Spade
Free Thinker
+4
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

You really get your jollies locking horns with deniers, don't you. I can't be bothered with meatheads. Life is too short.

Meatheads with vested interests.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by NugglerView Post

Yes, some more words. What would be do without them.
Let's start the "Church of words and reports"
Jesus wants us to, I can feel it.
Goodness gracious sort of sums it up Capt. well done.


A friend of mine had an old expression whenever he'd wash his old klunker:

"You can polish a turd, but it will always be a piece of sh*t"

I believe this expression is fully appropriate to the reams of 'new' studies on the subject
 
mentalfloss
#10
U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe

The government’s newest national assessment of climate change, released early Tuesday, declares what a wide majority of scientists say is clear: Americans are already feeling the effects of global warming.

Heavy Northeast downpours unleashed by super storms such as Sandy, flooding from sea-level rise from Norfolk to Miami along the Atlantic Ocean, record-setting monster wildfires in several western states, a crop destroying heat wave in the Mid-West, and drought that has parched southern California, have all taken place in recent years.

“The report affirms a number of things we have known,” said Katharine Hayhoe, a Texas Tech University professor and lead co-author of the changing climate chapter of the assessment.

Another year of extreme weather brought a super typhoon, tornadoes, deadly wildfires, severe drought and killer floods. Here is a look at the most significant events to affect the environment.

“But there are new aspects,” Hayhoe said. “For a long time we have perceived climate change as an issue that’s distant, affecting just polar bears or something that matters to our kids. This shows it’s not just in the future; it matters today. Many people are feeling the effects.”

The decade starting in 2000 was the hottest on record, and 2012, the year Sandy followed an epic summer drought, was the hottest ever recorded in the nation’s history, the report says. U.S. temperature is 1.3 degrees to 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer now than it was 1895, and most of that increase — 80 percent, the assessment says — occurred over the last 44 years.

David Wolfe, a professor at Cornell University who was a lead co-author of the report’s chapter on change in the Northeast, said that might sound frightening, but he and other authors of the study are optimistic that climate impacts can be mitigated.

Business leaders are looking more toward investments in renewable energy, he said. This third assessment, unlike the others, offers a Web site with interactive tools showing Americans how to reduce climate impacts.

“It will be a living document, a resource for people...,” he said. “It’s a place to start.”

Wolfe’s optimism wasn’t universally shared, even among some co-authors who described the assessment as too conservative — a consensus document meant to reflect the diverse views of the more than 300 scientists who crafted it.

To mark the release of the report, President Obama is expected to speak with a number of national television meteorologists from across the country about climate change early Tuesday afternoon.

The federal climate assessment brought together hundreds of climate experts in academia and government to guide U.S. policy based on the best available climate science. They were billed by the U.S. Global Change Research Program as “the largest and most diverse team to produce a U.S. climate assessment.”

They worked for several years, holding 70 workshops nationwide, revising the final drafts to reflect thousands of public comments. They were guided by a 60-member panel called the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee.

Echoing the findings of a global report by climate scientists at the International Panel on Climate Change, U.S. scientists said the climate is changing in the United States almost without a doubt, and the warming of the past 50 years is primarily due to emissions of heat-trapping gases released by humans.

Burning coal for electricity, oil and gas in vehicles, along with forest clear cutting and certain agricultural practices, all for the convenience of humans, contribute to the problem, the assessment said.

By the end of the century, temperatures could be up to 5 degrees higher if the nation acts aggressively to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industry, or up to 10 degrees if emissions are high.

The higher the temperature, the more dire the impact. Extreme weather in the United States has “increased in recent decades,” the report said.

The assessment carves the nation into sections and examines the impacts: More sea-level rise, flooding, storm surge, precipitation and heat waves in the Northeast; frequent water shortages and hurricanes in the Southeast and Caribbean; more drought and wildfires in the Southwest.

Rapidly receding ice and shrinking glaciers are occuring in Alaska, which warmed twice as fast as the rest of the country in the past 60 years. And warmer oceans, along with increased acidification, particularly in the Pacific, has put marine life in peril.


Sea-level rise is a major concern to the District, Maryland and Virginia. A report last year by the Maryland Commission on Climate Change found that coastal sea-level rise on the state shoreline will range from slightly less than a foot to more than two feet by mid-century, and from two to six feet by the end of the century, depending on whether carbon emissions increase or decrease.

Climate change is also leading to heat stress events, forcing people with respiratory illnesses to turn to devices such as inhalers or to hospitals, the federal assessment said. It is leading to more severe allergies and waterborne illnesses as pathogens increase. Minority communities are especially vulnerable.

Extreme heat causes more deaths than other weather events, and that is expected to continue. Such deaths have decreased in recent years, but the assessment attributed that to better weather.

But increased heat doesn’t just affect humans. In warmer and more acidic oceans, particularly the Pacific, the effects of climate change are deadly, said Drew Harvell, a Cornell University professor of ecology and a co-author of the marine resources chapter of the assessment.

Marine scientists in the Pacific have traced the mass die off of the sunflower star, a type of sea star, to warmer temperatures. In a laboratory, 10 sunflower stars were placed in water with normal temperature and another 10 in water only 1 degree warmer.

Within two days, half the sunflower stars in the warmer water were dead. “It’s going to get worse with warming,” Harvell said.

Thirty percent of carbon released into the atmosphere is sucked up by the ocean, leading to acidification that’s killing coral and shell life. Coral protects young fish from predators, and tiny shellfish, at the bottom of the food chain, help feed entire ecosystems.

“A third of all coral is at the risk of extinction,” Harvell said. After two decades of studying marine life, her view of the future was more negative than both Wolfe and the Cato researchers.

“It’s important to understand that this is a very, very, very conservative document, a consensus document,” Harvell said of the assessment. The truth is more dire.

“The Pacific Ocean is the place with the most extreme problem with acidification and salmon, mussels, things heavily affected,” she said. “I’m not sure there are many mitigations to these impacts. There’s hope, but there’s got to be some pretty radical changes to practices and policies.”

U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe - The Washington Post (external - login to view)
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post


U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe - The Washington Post (external - login to view)


 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe

The government’s newest national assessment of climate change, released early Tuesday, declares what a wide majority of scientists say is clear: Americans are already feeling the effects of global warming.

Heavy Northeast downpours unleashed by super storms such as Sandy, flooding from sea-level rise from Norfolk to Miami along the Atlantic Ocean, record-setting monster wildfires in several western states, a crop destroying heat wave in the Mid-West, and drought that has parched southern California, have all taken place in recent years.

“The report affirms a number of things we have known,” said Katharine Hayhoe, a Texas Tech University professor and lead co-author of the changing climate chapter of the assessment.

Another year of extreme weather brought a super typhoon, tornadoes, deadly wildfires, severe drought and killer floods. Here is a look at the most significant events to affect the environment.

“But there are new aspects,” Hayhoe said. “For a long time we have perceived climate change as an issue that’s distant, affecting just polar bears or something that matters to our kids. This shows it’s not just in the future; it matters today. Many people are feeling the effects.”

The decade starting in 2000 was the hottest on record, and 2012, the year Sandy followed an epic summer drought, was the hottest ever recorded in the nation’s history, the report says. U.S. temperature is 1.3 degrees to 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer now than it was 1895, and most of that increase — 80 percent, the assessment says — occurred over the last 44 years.

David Wolfe, a professor at Cornell University who was a lead co-author of the report’s chapter on change in the Northeast, said that might sound frightening, but he and other authors of the study are optimistic that climate impacts can be mitigated.

Business leaders are looking more toward investments in renewable energy, he said. This third assessment, unlike the others, offers a Web site with interactive tools showing Americans how to reduce climate impacts.

“It will be a living document, a resource for people...,” he said. “It’s a place to start.”

Wolfe’s optimism wasn’t universally shared, even among some co-authors who described the assessment as too conservative — a consensus document meant to reflect the diverse views of the more than 300 scientists who crafted it.

To mark the release of the report, President Obama is expected to speak with a number of national television meteorologists from across the country about climate change early Tuesday afternoon.

The federal climate assessment brought together hundreds of climate experts in academia and government to guide U.S. policy based on the best available climate science. They were billed by the U.S. Global Change Research Program as “the largest and most diverse team to produce a U.S. climate assessment.”

They worked for several years, holding 70 workshops nationwide, revising the final drafts to reflect thousands of public comments. They were guided by a 60-member panel called the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee.

Echoing the findings of a global report by climate scientists at the International Panel on Climate Change, U.S. scientists said the climate is changing in the United States almost without a doubt, and the warming of the past 50 years is primarily due to emissions of heat-trapping gases released by humans.

Burning coal for electricity, oil and gas in vehicles, along with forest clear cutting and certain agricultural practices, all for the convenience of humans, contribute to the problem, the assessment said.

By the end of the century, temperatures could be up to 5 degrees higher if the nation acts aggressively to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industry, or up to 10 degrees if emissions are high.

The higher the temperature, the more dire the impact. Extreme weather in the United States has “increased in recent decades,” the report said.

The assessment carves the nation into sections and examines the impacts: More sea-level rise, flooding, storm surge, precipitation and heat waves in the Northeast; frequent water shortages and hurricanes in the Southeast and Caribbean; more drought and wildfires in the Southwest.

Rapidly receding ice and shrinking glaciers are occuring in Alaska, which warmed twice as fast as the rest of the country in the past 60 years. And warmer oceans, along with increased acidification, particularly in the Pacific, has put marine life in peril.


Sea-level rise is a major concern to the District, Maryland and Virginia. A report last year by the Maryland Commission on Climate Change found that coastal sea-level rise on the state shoreline will range from slightly less than a foot to more than two feet by mid-century, and from two to six feet by the end of the century, depending on whether carbon emissions increase or decrease.

Climate change is also leading to heat stress events, forcing people with respiratory illnesses to turn to devices such as inhalers or to hospitals, the federal assessment said. It is leading to more severe allergies and waterborne illnesses as pathogens increase. Minority communities are especially vulnerable.

Extreme heat causes more deaths than other weather events, and that is expected to continue. Such deaths have decreased in recent years, but the assessment attributed that to better weather.

But increased heat doesn’t just affect humans. In warmer and more acidic oceans, particularly the Pacific, the effects of climate change are deadly, said Drew Harvell, a Cornell University professor of ecology and a co-author of the marine resources chapter of the assessment.

Marine scientists in the Pacific have traced the mass die off of the sunflower star, a type of sea star, to warmer temperatures. In a laboratory, 10 sunflower stars were placed in water with normal temperature and another 10 in water only 1 degree warmer.

Within two days, half the sunflower stars in the warmer water were dead. “It’s going to get worse with warming,” Harvell said.

Thirty percent of carbon released into the atmosphere is sucked up by the ocean, leading to acidification that’s killing coral and shell life. Coral protects young fish from predators, and tiny shellfish, at the bottom of the food chain, help feed entire ecosystems.

“A third of all coral is at the risk of extinction,” Harvell said. After two decades of studying marine life, her view of the future was more negative than both Wolfe and the Cato researchers.

“It’s important to understand that this is a very, very, very conservative document, a consensus document,” Harvell said of the assessment. The truth is more dire.

“The Pacific Ocean is the place with the most extreme problem with acidification and salmon, mussels, things heavily affected,” she said. “I’m not sure there are many mitigations to these impacts. There’s hope, but there’s got to be some pretty radical changes to practices and policies.”

U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe - The Washington Post (external - login to view)

I like the part where they call it a concensus document. So were all the IPCC reports. And we allknow how accurate they turned out.
Anyone taken a boat trip through the ice free arctic ocean yet?
 
petros
#13
OMG OMG OMG!!! What would a man do?
 
Locutus
#14
dire
 
EagleSmack
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

You really get your jollies locking horns with deniers, don't you. I can't be bothered with meatheads. Life is too short.

Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

It would be nice if this wasn't such a big problem for them so there would be less headache.

 
mentalfloss
#16
Finally Eaglesmack posts an appropriate gif.
 
Spade
Free Thinker
+1
#17
We've softened him up.

"He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls!"
-The Eagle
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#18
We'll have 100% agreement on AGW as soon as the right wingers figure out they can blame Obama for it.
 
mentalfloss
+1
#19
As soon as there becomes a substantial profit incentive for shifting resources, you'll see the right jumping on the greenwagon.

A copy of the report for those interested:

Full Report | National Climate Assessment
 
EagleSmack
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Finally Eaglesmack posts an appropriate gif.

They're always appropriate. You're just jealous of my superior gif arsenal.
 
mentalfloss
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

They're always appropriate. You're just jealous of my superior gif arsenal.

 
mentalfloss
+1
#22
National Climate Assessment: 15 arresting images of climate change now and in the pipeline

Culminating five years of work, the U.S. National Climate Assessment was released this morning, offering a comprehensive review of observed and projected climate change. The amount of information contained within the report is vast, but below are some of the key images from its highlight document. They reveal a world and nation warming, poised to warm more, and the impacts playing out before our eyes.

News story: U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe

1. The period from 2001-2012 was the warmest on record globally. Every year was warmer than the 1990s average.


Via the report: “Bars show the difference between each decade's average temperature and the overall average for 1901-2000.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

2. The warming trend is unlikely due to changes in the sun’s output, which has not varied substantially as temperatures have risen.


Via the report: “The full record of satellite measurements of the sun's energy received at the top of the Earth's atmosphere is shown in red, following its natural 11-year cycle of small ups and downs, without any net increase. Over the same period, global temperature relative to 1961-1990 average (shown in blue) has risen markedly. This is a clear indication that changes in the sun are not responsible for the observed warming over recent decades.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

3. U.S. temperatures have warmed 1.3-1.9 degrees since 1895, with most of the increase since 1970.


Via the report: “The colors on the map show temperature changes over the past 22 years (1991-2012) compared to the 1901-1960 average for the contiguous U.S., and to the 1951-1980 average for Alaska and Hawai’i. The bars on the graph show the average temperature changes by decade for 1901-2012 (relative to the 1901-1960 average). The far right bar (2000s decade) includes 2011 and 2012. The period from 2001 to 2012 was warmer than any previous decade in every region.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

4. Precipitation events are trending heavier in the U.S.


Via the report: “One measure of a heavy precipitation event is a 2-day precipitation total that is exceeded on average only once in a five-year period, also known as a once-in-five-year event. As this extreme precipitation index for 1901-2012 shows, the occurrence of such events has become much more common in recent decades. Changes are compared to the period 1901-1960, and do not include Alaska or Hawai'i. The 2000s decade (far right bar) includes 2001-2012.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

5. Sea levels are rising, with some of the fastest rates (1-2 feet per century) in the Northeast.


Via the report: “The map on the left shows local sea level trends in the Northeast region. The length of the arrows varies with the length of the time series for each tide gauge location. The graph at the right shows observed sea level rise in Philadelphia, which has increased by 1.2 feet over the past century, significantly exceeding the global average of 8 inches, increasing the risk of impacts to critical urban infrastructure in low-lying areas.(U.S. Global Change Research Program)

6. Warmer ocean temperatures are leading to an increase in coral bleaching in tropical areas, in the U.S. and around the world.


Via the report: ” The global extent and severity of mass coral bleaching have increased worldwide over the last decade. Red dots indicate severe bleaching.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

7. The length of the frost-free season is growing.


Via the report: “The frost-free season length, defined as the period between the last occurrence of 32?F in the spring and the first occurrence of 32?F in the fall, has increased in each U.S. region during 1991-2012 relative to 1901-1960. Increases in frost-free season length correspond to similar increases in growing season length.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

8. The ragweed (pollen) season is expanding


Via the report: “Ragweed pollen season length has increased in central North America between 1995 and 2011 by as much as 11 to 27 days in parts of the U.S. and Canada in response to rising temperatures. Increases in the length of this allergenic pollen season are correlated with increases in the number of days before the first frost. As shown in the figure, the largest increases have been observed in northern cities.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

9. Heating demand is decreasing, cooling demand is increasing.


Via the report: “Figure shows observed increases in population-weighted cooling degree days, which result in increased air conditioning use, and decreases in population-weighted heating degree days, meaning less energy required to heat buildings in winter, compared to the average for 1970-2000. Cooling degree days are defined as the number of degrees that a day's average temperature is above 65?F, while heating degree days are the number of degrees a day's average temperature is below 65?F.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

10. Temperatures are projected to warm from a few to over 10 degrees by the end of the 21st century, depending on future greenhouse gas emissions.


Via the report: “Maps show projected change in average surface air temperature in the later part of this century (2071-2099) relative to the later part of the last century (1970-1999) under a scenario that assumes substantial reductions in heat trapping gases (B1) and a higher emissions scenario that assumes continued increases in global emissions (A2). These scenarios are used throughout this report for assessing impacts under lower and higher emissions.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

11. The hottest days are projected to warm substantially.

Via the report: “The maps show projected increases in the average temperature on the hottest days by late this century (2081-2100) relative to 1986-2005 under a scenario that assumes a rapid reduction in heat-trapping gases (RCP 2.6) and a scenario that assumes continued increases in these gases (RCP 8.5). The hottest days are those so hot they occur only once in 20 years. Across most of the continental U.S., those days will be about 10?F to 15?F hotter in the future under the higher emissions scenario, increasing health risks.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

12. Sea levels in the U.S. are projected to rise 1 to 4 feet depending on future greenhouse gas emissions and the rate of climate change

Via the report: “Figure shows estimated, observed, and possible amounts of global sea level rise from 1800 to 2100, relative to the year 2000. Estimates from proxy data (for example, based on sediment records) are shown in red (1800-1890, pink band shows uncertainty), tide gauge data in blue for 1880-2009, and satellite observations are shown in green from 1993 to 2012. The future scenarios range from 0.66 feet to 6.6 feet in 2100. These scenarios are not based on climate model simulations, but rather reflect the range of possible scenarios based on other kinds of scientific studies. The orange line at right shows the currently projected range of sea level rise of 1 to 4 feet by 2100, which falls within the larger risk-based scenario range. The large projected range reflects uncertainty about how glaciers and ice sheets will react to the warming ocean, the warming atmosphere, and changing winds and currents. As seen in the observations, there are year-to-year variations in the trend.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

13. Warming is projected to reduce soil moisture in much of the West by several to 10-15 percent by the end of the century; how fast and how much depends on future greenhouse gas emissions

Via the report: “Increased temperatures and changing precipitation patterns will alter soil moisture, which is important for agriculture and ecosystems and has many societal implications. These maps show average change in soil moisture compared to 1971-2000, as projected for late this century (2071-2100) under two emissions scenarios, a lower scenario (B1) and a higher scenario (A2). Eastern U.S. is not displayed because model simulations were only run for the area shown.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

14. The projected increase in the frost-free season, days without precipitation and hot nights will impact agriculture.

Via the report: “Many climate variables affect agriculture. The maps above show projected changes in key climate variables affecting agricultural productivity for the end of the century (2070-2099) compared to 1971-2000. Changes in climate parameters critical to agriculture show lengthening of the frost-free or growing season and reductions in the number of frost days (days with minimum temperatures below freezing), under an emissions scenario that assumes continued increases in heat-trapping gases (A2). Changes in these two variables are not identical, with the length of the growing season increasing across most of the United States and more variation in the change in the number of frost days. Warmer-season crops, such as melons, would grow better in warmer areas, while other crops, such as cereals, would grow more quickly, meaning less time for the grain itself to mature, reducing productivity.1 Taking advantage of the increasing length of the growing season and changing planting dates could allow planting of more diverse crop rotations, which can be an effective adaptation strategy. On the frost-free map, white areas are projected to experience no freezes for 2070-2099, and gray areas are projected to experience more than 10 frost-free years during the same period. In the lower left graph, consecutive dry days are defined as the annual maximum number of consecutive days with less than 0.01 inches of precipitation. In the lower right graph, hot nights are defined as nights with a minimum temperature higher than 98% of the minimum temperatures between 1971 and 2000.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

15. Climate change significantly increases the risk of water supply stress by mid-century, especially in the western U.S.


Via the report: “The effects of climate change, primarily associated with increasing temperatures and potential evapotranspiration, are projected to significantly increase water demand across most of the United States. Maps show percent change from 2005 to 2060 in projected demand for water assuming (a) change in population and socioeconomic conditions consistent with the A1B emissions scenario (increasing emissions through the middle of this century, with gradual reductions thereafter), but with no change in climate, and (b) combined changes in population, socioeconomic conditions, and climate according to the A1B emissions scenario.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

National Climate Assessment: 15 arresting images of climate change now and in the pipeline - The Washington Post (external - login to view)
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+2
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

National Climate Assessment: 15 arresting images of climate change now and in the pipeline

Culminating five years of work, the U.S. National Climate Assessment was released this morning, offering a comprehensive review of observed and projected climate change. The amount of information contained within the report is vast, but below are some of the key images from its highlight document. They reveal a world and nation warming, poised to warm more, and the impacts playing out before our eyes.

News story: U.S. climate report says global warming impact already severe

1. The period from 2001-2012 was the warmest on record globally. Every year was warmer than the 1990s average.


Via the report: “Bars show the difference between each decade's average temperature and the overall average for 1901-2000.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

2. The warming trend is unlikely due to changes in the sun’s output, which has not varied substantially as temperatures have risen.


Via the report: “The full record of satellite measurements of the sun's energy received at the top of the Earth's atmosphere is shown in red, following its natural 11-year cycle of small ups and downs, without any net increase. Over the same period, global temperature relative to 1961-1990 average (shown in blue) has risen markedly. This is a clear indication that changes in the sun are not responsible for the observed warming over recent decades.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

3. U.S. temperatures have warmed 1.3-1.9 degrees since 1895, with most of the increase since 1970.


Via the report: “The colors on the map show temperature changes over the past 22 years (1991-2012) compared to the 1901-1960 average for the contiguous U.S., and to the 1951-1980 average for Alaska and Hawai’i. The bars on the graph show the average temperature changes by decade for 1901-2012 (relative to the 1901-1960 average). The far right bar (2000s decade) includes 2011 and 2012. The period from 2001 to 2012 was warmer than any previous decade in every region.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

4. Precipitation events are trending heavier in the U.S.


Via the report: “One measure of a heavy precipitation event is a 2-day precipitation total that is exceeded on average only once in a five-year period, also known as a once-in-five-year event. As this extreme precipitation index for 1901-2012 shows, the occurrence of such events has become much more common in recent decades. Changes are compared to the period 1901-1960, and do not include Alaska or Hawai'i. The 2000s decade (far right bar) includes 2001-2012.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

5. Sea levels are rising, with some of the fastest rates (1-2 feet per century) in the Northeast.


Via the report: “The map on the left shows local sea level trends in the Northeast region. The length of the arrows varies with the length of the time series for each tide gauge location. The graph at the right shows observed sea level rise in Philadelphia, which has increased by 1.2 feet over the past century, significantly exceeding the global average of 8 inches, increasing the risk of impacts to critical urban infrastructure in low-lying areas.(U.S. Global Change Research Program)

6. Warmer ocean temperatures are leading to an increase in coral bleaching in tropical areas, in the U.S. and around the world.


Via the report: ” The global extent and severity of mass coral bleaching have increased worldwide over the last decade. Red dots indicate severe bleaching.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

7. The length of the frost-free season is growing.


Via the report: “The frost-free season length, defined as the period between the last occurrence of 32?F in the spring and the first occurrence of 32?F in the fall, has increased in each U.S. region during 1991-2012 relative to 1901-1960. Increases in frost-free season length correspond to similar increases in growing season length.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

8. The ragweed (pollen) season is expanding


Via the report: “Ragweed pollen season length has increased in central North America between 1995 and 2011 by as much as 11 to 27 days in parts of the U.S. and Canada in response to rising temperatures. Increases in the length of this allergenic pollen season are correlated with increases in the number of days before the first frost. As shown in the figure, the largest increases have been observed in northern cities.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

9. Heating demand is decreasing, cooling demand is increasing.


Via the report: “Figure shows observed increases in population-weighted cooling degree days, which result in increased air conditioning use, and decreases in population-weighted heating degree days, meaning less energy required to heat buildings in winter, compared to the average for 1970-2000. Cooling degree days are defined as the number of degrees that a day's average temperature is above 65?F, while heating degree days are the number of degrees a day's average temperature is below 65?F.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

10. Temperatures are projected to warm from a few to over 10 degrees by the end of the 21st century, depending on future greenhouse gas emissions.


Via the report: “Maps show projected change in average surface air temperature in the later part of this century (2071-2099) relative to the later part of the last century (1970-1999) under a scenario that assumes substantial reductions in heat trapping gases (B1) and a higher emissions scenario that assumes continued increases in global emissions (A2). These scenarios are used throughout this report for assessing impacts under lower and higher emissions.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

11. The hottest days are projected to warm substantially.

Via the report: “The maps show projected increases in the average temperature on the hottest days by late this century (2081-2100) relative to 1986-2005 under a scenario that assumes a rapid reduction in heat-trapping gases (RCP 2.6) and a scenario that assumes continued increases in these gases (RCP 8.5). The hottest days are those so hot they occur only once in 20 years. Across most of the continental U.S., those days will be about 10?F to 15?F hotter in the future under the higher emissions scenario, increasing health risks.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

12. Sea levels in the U.S. are projected to rise 1 to 4 feet depending on future greenhouse gas emissions and the rate of climate change

Via the report: “Figure shows estimated, observed, and possible amounts of global sea level rise from 1800 to 2100, relative to the year 2000. Estimates from proxy data (for example, based on sediment records) are shown in red (1800-1890, pink band shows uncertainty), tide gauge data in blue for 1880-2009, and satellite observations are shown in green from 1993 to 2012. The future scenarios range from 0.66 feet to 6.6 feet in 2100. These scenarios are not based on climate model simulations, but rather reflect the range of possible scenarios based on other kinds of scientific studies. The orange line at right shows the currently projected range of sea level rise of 1 to 4 feet by 2100, which falls within the larger risk-based scenario range. The large projected range reflects uncertainty about how glaciers and ice sheets will react to the warming ocean, the warming atmosphere, and changing winds and currents. As seen in the observations, there are year-to-year variations in the trend.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

13. Warming is projected to reduce soil moisture in much of the West by several to 10-15 percent by the end of the century; how fast and how much depends on future greenhouse gas emissions

Via the report: “Increased temperatures and changing precipitation patterns will alter soil moisture, which is important for agriculture and ecosystems and has many societal implications. These maps show average change in soil moisture compared to 1971-2000, as projected for late this century (2071-2100) under two emissions scenarios, a lower scenario (B1) and a higher scenario (A2). Eastern U.S. is not displayed because model simulations were only run for the area shown.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

14. The projected increase in the frost-free season, days without precipitation and hot nights will impact agriculture.

Via the report: “Many climate variables affect agriculture. The maps above show projected changes in key climate variables affecting agricultural productivity for the end of the century (2070-2099) compared to 1971-2000. Changes in climate parameters critical to agriculture show lengthening of the frost-free or growing season and reductions in the number of frost days (days with minimum temperatures below freezing), under an emissions scenario that assumes continued increases in heat-trapping gases (A2). Changes in these two variables are not identical, with the length of the growing season increasing across most of the United States and more variation in the change in the number of frost days. Warmer-season crops, such as melons, would grow better in warmer areas, while other crops, such as cereals, would grow more quickly, meaning less time for the grain itself to mature, reducing productivity.1 Taking advantage of the increasing length of the growing season and changing planting dates could allow planting of more diverse crop rotations, which can be an effective adaptation strategy. On the frost-free map, white areas are projected to experience no freezes for 2070-2099, and gray areas are projected to experience more than 10 frost-free years during the same period. In the lower left graph, consecutive dry days are defined as the annual maximum number of consecutive days with less than 0.01 inches of precipitation. In the lower right graph, hot nights are defined as nights with a minimum temperature higher than 98% of the minimum temperatures between 1971 and 2000.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

15. Climate change significantly increases the risk of water supply stress by mid-century, especially in the western U.S.


Via the report: “The effects of climate change, primarily associated with increasing temperatures and potential evapotranspiration, are projected to significantly increase water demand across most of the United States. Maps show percent change from 2005 to 2060 in projected demand for water assuming (a) change in population and socioeconomic conditions consistent with the A1B emissions scenario (increasing emissions through the middle of this century, with gradual reductions thereafter), but with no change in climate, and (b) combined changes in population, socioeconomic conditions, and climate according to the A1B emissions scenario.” (U.S. Global Change Research Program)

National Climate Assessment: 15 arresting images of climate change now and in the pipeline - The Washington Post (external - login to view)

Yup all that sea level rising must be believable when one lives in land .
I wonder why I can sit on the same rock for 50 plus years and see no change .
But Bora Bora sank Oh wait .
 
Walter
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

We'll have 100% agreement on AGW as soon as the right wingers figure out they can blame Obama for it.

Then the leftards would deny.
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

We'll have 100% agreement on AGW as soon as the right wingers figure out they can blame Obama for it.

Only if he wears a white suit
 
mentalfloss
#26
Half U.S. Population Vulnerable to Climate Change: Report

More than half the U.S. population lives in coastal areas that are “increasingly vulnerable” to the effects of climate change, which will ripple throughout the U.S. economy, a White House advisory group’s report concluded.

The report released today said the impact of the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is already affecting Americans, with coastal flooding, heavier downpours and more intense wildfire episodes. And more changes are coming.

“The real bottom line is that climate change is not a distant threat,” John Holdren, the White House science adviser, told reporters today. “It’s already affecting different regions in the country.”

The findings may bolster President Barack Obama’s energy and environmental agenda, which he is pursuing without legislation from Congress, as well as his proposals to prepare the U.S. to deal with global warming. The administration is focusing on climate change policies this week in conjunction with the release of the report, said John Podesta, an Obama adviser who’s overseeing the president’s climate plans.

The warming climate will affect broad sectors of the economy, from infrastructure along the densely populated corridor from Washington to New York to Boston, to crops in the Midwest farm belt to water supplies in growing cities of the Southwest, the authors concluded.

Half U.S. Population Vulnerable to Climate Change: Report - Bloomberg (external - login to view)
 
Walter
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Half U.S. Population Vulnerable to Climate Change: Report

More than half the U.S. population lives in coastal areas that are “increasingly vulnerable” to the effects of climate change, which will ripple throughout the U.S. economy, a White House advisory group’s report concluded.

The report released today said the impact of the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is already affecting Americans, with coastal flooding, heavier downpours and more intense wildfire episodes. And more changes are coming.

“The real bottom line is that climate change is not a distant threat,” John Holdren, the White House science adviser, told reporters today. “It’s already affecting different regions in the country.”

The findings may bolster President Barack Obama’s energy and environmental agenda, which he is pursuing without legislation from Congress, as well as his proposals to prepare the U.S. to deal with global warming. The administration is focusing on climate change policies this week in conjunction with the release of the report, said John Podesta, an Obama adviser who’s overseeing the president’s climate plans.

The warming climate will affect broad sectors of the economy, from infrastructure along the densely populated corridor from Washington to New York to Boston, to crops in the Midwest farm belt to water supplies in growing cities of the Southwest, the authors concluded.

Half U.S. Population Vulnerable to Climate Change: Report - Bloomberg (external - login to view)

Drivel.
 
mentalfloss
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by WalterView Post

Drivel.

Pathetic.
 
Walter
-1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Pathetic.

More drivel.
 
mentalfloss
#30
Wow this is a really enlightening thing you've started here.
 

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