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Watch as I take you through the documents showing just how much the University of Ottawa was willing to cater to Suzuki in exchange for an anti-Conservative speech.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIStMfECZZI

Canada’s patron saint of climate alarmism, David Suzuki, is at it again.

The renowned fruit fly biologist was touring the country during the election last summer and fall, touting his environmentally-inspired anti-Conservative agenda. For much of the summer, he was stumping for Leadnow, the American-funded group that was encouraging strategic voting against Conservatives. On Sept. 21, he also brought his message to the University of Ottawa, however, as a guest of the school’s IVote-JeVote program, spearheaded by professor Kevin Page, formerly the Parliamentary Budget Officer.

Suzuki’s remarks at the publicly funded university excited organizers, with Page calling it a “bulls eye” and a colleague of his writing, “This is INCREDIBLE!!!!” in emails obtained exclusively by The Rebel under the Freedom of Information Act.

While Suzuki waived his fee, he had some other demands that the school had to meet. In addition to the $600 hotel bill the school paid, Suzuki also received a catered $219.79 meal for one in his private VIP room. And a chef was also required to be on site. (Even Thomas Mulcair didn’t get a personal chef when he spoke at the school just days later.)

Suzuki also demanded personal screening of any media requests, and would not do any scrums, which often allow for unvetted reporters to ask unplanned questions.

Not that it mattered. The magnanimous Order of Canada recipient was pontificating on the state of Canadian politics in the nation’s capital, but there were only two interview requests that came in for Suzuki: one from a French radio station (he turned it down because he doesn’t speak French) and the other from the University of Ottawa’s student newspaper.

It doesn’t seem like Suzuki needs to be that selective of interviews, because despite what CBC would have us believe, the interest in him is apparently non-existent.

Why, then, was the University of Ottawa waiting on him hand and foot?

Suzuki’s assistant required that the university provide a chaperone—not to help guide him from one place to another, but, I kid you not, to “deflect requests from the general public for selfies, posed photos, hugs and requests for a minute of his time.”

All of the rules and stipulations serve to put a wall between Suzuki and anyone who might challenge him. I learned how important that barrier is to him last September when I found myself face to face with him for an unplanned and unscreened interview.

I attended a press conference Leadnow was hosting with him in London, Ont.: I was the only member of the media who showed up. He didn’t know who I was, so sat down without issue.

The second I asked him a question about actual science, rather than politics, he started shouting at me.

Watch as I take you through the documents showing just how much the University of Ottawa was willing to cater to Suzuki in exchange for an anti-Conservative speech.


SHOCKING: FOI docs reveal how far elites go to satisfy “King Suzuki’s” demands and hide his flaws - The Rebel


#thingsyouwon'tseeontheCBC