Massachusetts Outlaws School Bake Sales


Locutus
#1
Bake sales, the calorie-laden standby cash-strapped classrooms, PTAs and booster clubs rely on, will be outlawed from public schools as of Aug. 1 as part of new no-nonsense nutrition standards, forcing fundraisers back to the blackboard to cook up alternative ways to raise money for kids.

At a minimum, the nosh clampdown targets so-called “competitive” foods — those sold or served during the school day in hallways, cafeterias, stores and vending machines outside the regular lunch program, including bake sales, holiday parties and treats dished out to reward academic achievement. But state officials are pushing schools to expand the ban 24/7 to include evening, weekend and community events such as banquets, door-to-door candy sales and football games.

The Departments of Public Health and Education contend clearing tables of even whole milk and white bread is necessary to combat an obesity epidemic affecting a third of the state’s 1.5 million students. But parents argue crudites won’t cut it when the bills come due on athletic equipment and band trips.




more really common-sensed and outstanding super ideas here:


Parents: Rule’s half-baked - BostonHerald.com (external - login to view)
 
karrie
#2
I think one of the biggest ones they need to get rid of is food as a reward for academic achievement. I've been apalled at how many teachers give out suckers to reward kids for doing work that is expected of them.
 
EagleSmack
#3
Massachusetts LOVES doing this stuff! They simply love banning things and forbiding things. Full Democrat Party rule in our state so all they do is pass laws restricting stuff and raise taxes at their leisure.
 
SLM
+3
#4  Top Rated Post
I don't disagree with the notion of getting soda vending machines out of schools or upgrading the standards for what's served in the cafeteria. No school should be feeding our kids junk.

But messing with the occasional bake sale? That's taking things just too far. They never just kill something, they overkill it don't they?
 
EagleSmack
+1
#5
What else is the Massachusetts State government going to do? They spend all day thinking of this stuff.
 
SLM
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

What else is the Massachusetts State government going to do? They spend all day thinking of this stuff.

Yeah but they're going after cupcakes man. That's just too far.
 
EagleSmack
#7
Nothing thrills Massachusetts Democrat politicians than MAKING the citizens of Massachusetts stop doing what they are doing if it is fun.
 
shadowshiv
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

I don't disagree with the notion of getting soda vending machines out of schools or upgrading the standards for what's served in the cafeteria. No school should be feeding our kids junk.

But messing with the occasional bake sale? That's taking things just too far. They never just kill something, they overkill it don't they?

They may have taken the vending machines out and started serving better food, but the students themselves are not bothering to eat in them anymore. I read an article a few days ago stating that revenue from cafeterias are down at least 20%! I guess the students want to be able to choose what they eat rather than have it dictated to them.

I don't know. Maybe they should concentrate on something else, perhaps stopping the practice of passing any student regardless of how well they do in school? I don't give a rat's *** if holding a student back makes them "feel sad", if they don't have the grades to legitimately pass, then hold them back!
 
SLM
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by shadowshivView Post

They may have taken the vending machines out and started serving better food, but the students themselves are not bothering to eat in them anymore. I read an article a few days ago stating that revenue from cafeterias are down at least 20%! I guess the students want to be able to choose what they eat rather than have it dictated to them.

Lol. Yes, that would be the article where they were collectively objecting on being denied the right to buy french fries. I saw that one. There should be a protest movement right around the corner!

Quote:

I don't know. Maybe they should concentrate on something else, perhaps stopping the practice of passing any student regardless of how well they do in school? I don't give a rat's *** if holding a student back makes them "feel sad", if they don't have the grades to legitimately pass, then hold them back!

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Big leap from taking away their cupcakes and cookies to having actual integrity. You're such a dreamer.

On a more serious note (yeah, I have those on occasion too) it is quite sad the number of functionally illiterate graduates we do have. In this day and age, when everyone has the opportunity to go to school, illiteracy should be a thing of the past. That it isn't says bucket loads.
 
captain morgan
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Lol. Yes, that would be the article where they were collectively objecting on being denied the right to buy french fries. I saw that one. There should be a protest movement right around the corner!

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Big leap from taking away their cupcakes and cookies to having actual integrity. You're such a dreamer.

On a more serious note (yeah, I have those on occasion too) it is quite sad the number of functionally illiterate graduates we do have. In this day and age, when everyone has the opportunity to go to school, illiteracy should be a thing of the past. That it isn't says bucket loads.


The solution to this issue is real easy:

  1. Easy access to the cafeteria on the first floor. Sells the health conscious stuff.
  2. Vending machines for pop and chips (etc) located at the end of the far football fields in a shed. Limited stock daily so ya better run, limit per customer 2 items per visit
 
mentalfloss
#11
Save the cupcakes!!!
 
EagleSmack
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by shadowshivView Post

They may have taken the vending machines out and started serving better food, but the students themselves are not bothering to eat in them anymore. I read an article a few days ago stating that revenue from cafeterias are down at least 20%! I guess the students want to be able to choose what they eat rather than have it dictated to them.

You're right. They have had boycotts because of the manipulation of the school lunch "for their own good."
 
petros
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

I don't disagree with the notion of getting soda vending machines out of schools or upgrading the standards for what's served in the cafeteria. No school should be feeding our kids junk.

You're right. No school should be feeding kids junk or any food for that matter. That is the responsibility of the parents.
 
EagleSmack
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Lol. Yes, that would be the article where they were collectively objecting on being denied the right to buy french fries. I saw that one. There should be a protest movement right around the corner!

I think the kids bringing their own lunch in protest was a great idea. There are a lot of heavy kids but what about the ones that aren't and have to eat bland food because administrators decide. My kids are in HS and I'll be darned if I see as many over weight kids as they say there are.

I was never overweight as a kid. In fact it was nearly impossible to gain weight. If I had to eat a 200 calorie lunch as a teen I would have been even skinnier.
 
petros
+1
#15
Maybe if kids were allowed to play sports at recess they wouldn't be so damn fat?
 
EagleSmack
#16
But what about their feelings if they lose a kick ball game or get hit with a ball during dodge ball? Lifelong implications Petros.
 
petros
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

But what about their feelings if they lose a kick ball game or get hit with a ball during dodge ball? Lifelong implications Petros.

If all the kids are fat, who gets picked for teams last?
 
captain morgan
+3
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

But what about their feelings if they lose a kick ball game


Apparently you're not up to speed on the new rules. All sporting events require that every participant be provided a medal or other form of merit recognition. Those participants that place within the top three are reprimanded severely for their abuse of fellow students.

Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

or get hit with a ball during dodge ball?

Impossible, dodge ball is played with a pretend ball. In the event that a participant is 'hit' by the faux ball, an emergency therapy session will be engaged on the spot and all participants subjected to an intervention.
 
EagleSmack
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Apparently you're not up to speed on the new rules. All sporting events require that every participant be provided a medal or other form of merit recognition. Those participants that place within the top three are reprimanded severely for their abuse of fellow students.
.

Oh my sons played youth soccer. They have more medals than Michael Phelps and only had one championship between them.
 
petros
#20
But no lower lip dragging on the ground because they got awards for losing?
 
Locutus
#21
 
petros
#22
 
dumpthemonarchy
#23
Cookies are not junk food. These people are nuts.
 
Locutus
#24
Massachusetts backs off school bake sale ban



BOSTON (AP) – Cupcakes, brownies and other baked goodies will be spared the chopping block at Massachusetts schools after Gov. Deval Patrick (external - login to view) backed down from planned regulations to prohibit the sale of the treats at bake sales during school hours.


"Nobody is interested in banning bake sales," Patrick told reporters Thursday. "We are interested in student nutrition."

The regulations, which had been set to take effect Aug. 1, were approved by state health officials charged with overseeing a new school nutrition law aimed in part at battling childhood obesity.

The ban would have prohibited the sale of sweets in schools during the school day and 30 minutes before and after the start of classes. But parents and some school officials panned the ban, saying it would make it harder to raise needed cash to help pay for activities at the schools.

The regulations also caused a stir at the Statehouse.

Republican state Rep. Brad Hill, who sponsored an amendment in the Massachusetts House to lift the ban, said schools should be allowed to make their own decision on when to hold bake sales. The Massachusetts House adopted the amendment Wednesday striking down the prohibition. The Senate followed suit on Thursday.

Patrick said he would sign the measure lifting the ban, even as he defended public health officials who he said were just trying to follow the intent of the nutrition bill approved by lawmakers.

But the Department of Public Health made it clear that legislative action to lift the regulation wouldn't be necessary.

Public Health Commissioner John Auerbach said that at Patrick's direction the department will reverse the ban before its set to take effect. Auerbach said the ban will stay in effect, however, for goodies sold at school cafeterias during the school day.

Patrick signed the 2010 bill designed to encourage the state's elementary and high schools to offer healthier food choices for their students. The legislation requires schools to provide fruit and vegetable snack options and was designed to limit sugary sodas and sweet snacks along with potato chips and other vending machine offerings.

The law instructed state public health officials to draft and approve regulations needed to enforce the measure.


Massachusetts backs off school bake sale ban (external - login to view)
 
EagleSmack
#25
Oh well...on to the next stupid law Gov. Patrick!
 
SLM
#26
We have cookies again!!!!

 
Ron in Regina
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by LocutusView Post

Bake sales, the calorie-laden standby cash-strapped classrooms, PTAs and booster clubs rely on, will be outlawed from public schools as of Aug. 1 as part of new no-nonsense nutrition standards, forcing fundraisers back to the blackboard to cook up alternative ways to raise money for kids.

At a minimum, the nosh clampdown targets so-called “competitive” foods — those sold or served during the school day in hallways, cafeterias, stores and vending machines outside the regular lunch program, including bake sales, holiday parties and treats dished out to reward academic achievement. But state officials are pushing schools to expand the ban 24/7 to include evening, weekend and community events such as banquets, door-to-door candy sales and football games.

The Departments of Public Health and Education contend clearing tables of even whole milk and white bread is necessary to combat an obesity epidemic affecting a third of the state’s 1.5 million students. But parents argue crudites won’t cut it when the bills come due on athletic equipment and band trips.




more really common-sensed and outstanding super ideas here:


Parents: Rule’s half-baked - BostonHerald.com (external - login to view)


The "door to door candy sales" = $3/box of chocolate covered almonds.
This was manditory when my Son was in school. It was really bad in
High School with minimum quotas...where the kids where issed boxs of
these, & required to submit the total for the almonds (which means that
if they where not able to sell all the boxes...they just bought them, which
meant that the parents just bought them).

My Boy was larger than all of the teachers in his school by grade six. By
Grade nine, he was six feet tall....and by grade eleven, he was a 6'5", 290lb
native (in apearance) with a Mohawk. Going door to door, knocking on doors,
do you know how many boxes of chocolates he was able to sell? Nobody,
unless the knew him, would even open their doors, let alone show that they
had any money.

In all honesty, how many here on this Forum would have even answerred
their door for this kid....who didn't look like a kid, forced to flog these almonds
knowing that it was a manditory debt for his Father if he couldn't sell them
all....or sell any of them at all?

P.S. Before you answer the above question, to yourself, this is a picture of
my Boy when he was in Grade ten (he's the one in the passenger seat).

 
Liberalman
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by LocutusView Post

Bake sales, the calorie-laden standby cash-strapped classrooms, PTAs and booster clubs rely on, will be outlawed from public schools as of Aug. 1 as part of new no-nonsense nutrition standards, forcing fundraisers back to the blackboard to cook up alternative ways to raise money for kids.

At a minimum, the nosh clampdown targets so-called “competitive” foods — those sold or served during the school day in hallways, cafeterias, stores and vending machines outside the regular lunch program, including bake sales, holiday parties and treats dished out to reward academic achievement. But state officials are pushing schools to expand the ban 24/7 to include evening, weekend and community events such as banquets, door-to-door candy sales and football games.

The Departments of Public Health and Education contend clearing tables of even whole milk and white bread is necessary to combat an obesity epidemic affecting a third of the state’s 1.5 million students. But parents argue crudites won’t cut it when the bills come due on athletic equipment and band trips.




more really common-sensed and outstanding super ideas here:


Parents: Rule’s half-baked - BostonHerald.com (external - login to view)

If physical education were a compulsory subject there would be less fat kids in school
 
Niflmir
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

I think one of the biggest ones they need to get rid of is food as a reward for academic achievement. I've been apalled at how many teachers give out suckers to reward kids for doing work that is expected of them.

It also gives them unrealistic expectations for the real world. Out here in the real world, the reward for a job well done is more work.
 
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