The Working Poor Diet


Twila
#31
Quote:

But lots of estrogenic properties which are linked to cancer, and phytates, which can block mineral and vitamin absorption. It's not the holy grail necessarily. It still needs to go into a balanced diet, not totally replace other protein sources.

I'm beginning to think that the reason food has both good and bad properties is so we don't eat only that item all the time...
 
Ron in Regina
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

In the News daily, we keep getting told that so far Saskatchewan has
been an island in this economic turndown. My salary has held steady
(not up but not down) but the cost of everything in the grocery stores
has jumped up, and many things quite significantly in the last year.

Dexter Sinister could verify this, but here in Regina grocery shopping
has gotten much more painful than it was just a year ago...it's ugly. In
theory our economy is doing very well out here, and inflation is hitting
hard.


Saskatchewan's inflation rate highest in Canada: StatsCan
By Annie McLeod, Leader-Post and Canwest News ServiceFebruary 20, 2009
Saskatchewan's inflation rate highest in Canada: StatsCan (external - login to view)

Doug Elliott, publisher of SaskTrends Monitor, said the province’s relatively high inflation rate is mainly due to an 8.7-per-cent increase in shelter costs during the 12-month period. Those costs include rented and owned accommodations and the price of water, fuel and electricity.

Another factor in the CPI increase was food prices increasing 8.5 per cent in the province. Grocery food prices went up 10.5 per cent, driven mostly by higher prices for fresh fruit and vegetables, and bakery and cereal products.

How meat isn't mentioned above, I have no idea. I'm doing OK, but I know many
are having a tough go of things out here due to this inflation.
 
tracy
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

But lots of estrogenic properties which are linked to cancer, and phytates, which can block mineral and vitamin absorption. It's not the holy grail necessarily. It still needs to go into a balanced diet, not totally replace other protein sources.

I figured it couldn't be worse than the birth control pill, and at half the price of chicken I was sold on it!

The broader topic gives me mixed feelings. On the one hand, I feel terrible for anyone who has trouble feeding themselves or their families. On the other hand, I wonder if those people had ever given a second thought to the billions of people who had been struggling for food long before the economy got bad. Compared to the poor around the world, our poor are rich. When someone in Canada says they're starving, they mean they're hungry. In many parts of the world that statement can be taken literally. So my summary is help your neighbours with donations if you can and even in the hardest of times remember your blessings...
 
karrie
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by tracyView Post

I figured it couldn't be worse than the birth control pill, and at half the price of chicken I was sold on it!

So my summary is help your neighbours with donations if you can and even in the hardest of times remember your blessings...

I'm a mom and wife. I always look at the issue from the viewpoint of trying to feed a family, which includes a husband and son. Feeding them more estrogenics on a regular basis just doesn't appeal. But, it doesn't mean it's not in our diet sometimes.

As for your concerns... I have to agree. I can't help the question coming to my mind of how many really NEED the food bank, and how many are just using it as another method of loafing instead of putting some work into buying on the cheap. But, ya know, for those who really do need it, I want them to have access, even if they're the minority.
 
Twila
#35
Quote:

Feeding them more estrogenics on a regular basis just doesn't appeal. But, it doesn't mean it's not in our diet sometimes

Sometimes? They use soybeans to make vegetable oil. It's in almost everything.

Soybean oil (external - login to view)
 
SirJosephPorter
#36
I have been a working poor, though mercifully only for a short time. Back in the 70s, for a while I was the only one working (my wife didn’t have a job), and I was getting 700 $ per month after taxes (which wasn’t a whole lot of money, even back in 1978 ).

Anyway, I did some careful research in how to eat cheaply, and I carry many of those habits even to this day (even though now we are very well off indeed).

Offhand, I can see a couple of things wrong with the ‘working poor diet’. Chicken wings, pork chops are expensive. In fact, any kind of meat is expensive. An equally good source of proteins is the lentils. And not only Soya beans, these days a wide variety of lentils are available, black eye peas, chick peas, moog beans etc. Some of them have more proteins that beef or chicken.

Lentils are very cheap, certainly a lot cheaper than meat. When soaked over night in water they swell up to three times their original size, and a small amount of lentils goes a long way. An excellent source of proteins and they are also tasty.

Another way of eating lentils is to germinate them first (it takes two days and is very easy to do), so that each bean has a sprout growing from it. Germinating lentils are also rich in vitamins, in addition to proteins.

Another cheap and nutritious item is brown rice. Again, brown rice swells up when cooked (while to cook white rice you need equal amounts to water and rice, to cook brown rice you need three times as much water as rice). Brown rice is full of roughage and vitamins, which are removed during the processing to obtain white rice. Brown rice costs about as much as white rice.

And what about oatmeal? Why only half a cup of it for breakfast? I eat oatmeal for lunch many times. Again, a little bit goes a long way, oatmeal swells up substantially when cooked. Oatmeal costs about 10 to 15 cents per 100g, so you can have lunch literally for pennies.

As for fruit, apples and oranges are expensive, why not bananas? Full of vitamins, excellent source of potassium, carbohydrates and a lot cheaper than apples, oranges or grapefruit.

Thus many times my breakfast consists of about 100 g of low fat cottage cheese (a cheap and excellent source of proteins) and a banana.

There are many ways the working poor diet could be improved, made cheaper and more nutritious. But it does need a little bit of research.
Last edited by SirJosephPorter; Feb 25th, 2009 at 10:19 PM..
 
karrie
#37
SJP, you do get that the blog is all sorts of different people winging it with trying to live on $80 a month, right? There is no 'diet' to tinker with.
 
SirJosephPorter
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

SJP, you do get that the blog is all sorts of different people winging it with trying to live on $80 a month, right? There is no 'diet' to tinker with.

karrie, I was commenting on the working poor diet which started the thread. However, whether there is a diet to tinker with or not, the suggestions I have given will go long way towards feeding oneself for 80 $ per month (I assume you would need more than that to feed a family).
 
karrie
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

karrie, I was commenting on the working poor diet which started the thread. However, whether there is a diet to tinker with or not, the suggestions I have given will go long way towards feeding oneself for 80 $ per month (I assume you would need more than that to feed a family).

what you're referring to is just one blogger's tally for one day. They all vary.
 
talloola
#40
Meat can be part of the working poor diet, by putting a generous quantity of ground beef, and a little ground pork into the large quantity of spaghetti sauce, made from scratch freeze in 'one meal' quantities. The meat will make the meal stay with you longer,won't get hungry so fast.
Pasta is cheap, and often on special, a little cheese sprinkled on top is good, but
expensive.
Chopped carrotts cooked in the spaghetti sauce is good too.
I grew a large quantity of green beans, so I cook them for just a few minutes, and
lay them across the top of the spaghetti on the plate, delicious and healthy.

brown ground meats, add onion, tomatoe sauce, tomatoe paste, chopped carrotts,
simmer for a couple of hours, a very basic pasta sauce recipe.
transfer to plastic freezing containers, and use when needed.
I add white wine, garlic, a little paprika, italian seasonings, butter, sauteed mushrooms, but the sauce is fine without all these ingredients, unless you can
afford them.
 
SirJosephPorter
#41
Another way to save money is to make your own yogurt. When we were earning 700 $ a month, my wife bought a yogurt maker. It pays for itself in a very short order. Milk costs a fraction of yogurt, a yogurt container which costs 3 or 4 $ can be made in less than a dollar with the yogurt maker.

Yogurt is an excellent source of protein, vitamins, calcium and is low in calories. Dairy proteins, combined with lentils provide all the proteins that a human body needs, without any cholesterol or fat that accompanies meat.

If you can survive without meat, then lentils and yogurt is the way to go, very healthy, nutritious and inexpensive.

Incidentally, out of 700 $ I was earning, we managed to put away at least 200 $ a month
 
CanadianLove
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

I have seen it and live it. When the cost of housing, heat and hydro leaves you with little to nothing to put food on the table, you develop all sorts of tricks. From what I playfully call dumpster diving (cutting off the produce guy before the wilted carrots hit the bin) to a kitchen co-op - to guitar string snares and rabbit stew, there are ways to survive and get a lot of the bills paid too.

Get yourself a breeding pair of rabbits to cut the grass this Summer.
 
Liberalman
#43
It has been proven over an over again that pre-made foods in cans or containers have preservatives in them that will give you a lot of health problems later.

I know because for years I was a can man which meant I opened a can of food and ate it from the can.

I later started warming it up in a pot and later I would ad stuff to it and later I didn’t use caned food just from scratch.

Anyone who can boil water can cook.

I always thought that cooking was a complicated task like rocket science until I started watching a cooking show that aired in the early 1990s called the Urban Peasant and he made cooking seem like the easiest task to do.

With the internet there are a lot of cooking video web sites like Sam the Cooking Guy (external - login to view) and Cooking Meal with Gourmandia (external - login to view) and iFood TV (external - login to view)and Farmingscan.com (external - login to view) and many more.

Cooking is not a complicated task and it will save you a lot of money.

I did it and you can do it too.
 
talloola
#44
You're right a bout the yogurt. We have a 'blob' on our porridge every morning.

OUR ROYAL PORRIDGE, my invention, we have it every morning, will keep one
satisfied for many hours, depending how large a serving one makes.
My husband loves this breakfast, and it is a great way to start the day.

use soup bowl, and add portion of porridge, sprinkle on (ground) flax & sesame seeds, spread a mashed banana over top, add (any) kind of fruit you like, or none) on
top of banana, ( we use frozen raspberries and blueberries), put them in a bowl
first, and by the time you put porridge in bowl, they will be half thawed allready.
Spoon on top of mashed bananas.

put 'blob' of yogurt on top of that, sprinkle with granola, drizzle maple syrup
over top,(or whatever sweetner you want), add milk,
I buy whole sesame seeds and flax seeds, (very inexpensive) and grind them in coffee grinder, mix together, then
store them in freezer part of frig to preserve, very very healthy, and when sprinkled on the porridge, they just blend in.(don't eat them whole, as they will just
go right through without digesting), whole seeds will keep in the cupboard just
fine.
This tastes like a big yummy dessert, not a healthy sensible breaky. Enjoy.
 
CanadianLove
#45
Fried Spaghetti. Bit of margarine with salt and pepper, maybe some garlic powder. Add as much pre-cooked spaghetti as you think you can eat and fry till heated and the margarine is gone - no sauce. Use a non-stick pan if you use small amounts of margarine. 2-3 slices of bread with mayo - no butter. 2 one-a-days for dessert. Big glass of milk.
 
Tyr
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

I think tracy raises a very valid point though wolf. A lot of people have lost the knowledge of how to shop cheap. So we have all these people who are suddenly out of work, and simply don't know HOW to do it without spending $1000 a month on food. They don't know what to do with flour, sugar, oil, and milk... they need to buy pre-made biscuits, just for an example.

The loss of jobs isn't the only problem, there's also the problem of an entire generation of people who don't know HOW to live poor. And those who still have jobs, who don't get what it means to stare at an empty fridge and try to figure out how to feed your family for a week on your last $10.

there are all kinds of ways to subsist on $5/pp a day. Question is would you want to do it? Hotdogs and/or KD works for me about one day a yr other than that, I make food a priority.

I can get by on $14/day and that's with some serious bargin hunting
 
CanadianLove
#47
As bit of a protein suppliment, you can find the 90% protein in the drug store section of Wal-mart and some major food chains. The kind the weight lifters use. You don't have to use the recommended dose, just sprinkle a bit on your cereal, add a bit to your milk or Coco to bump up your protein intake to a good level.
 
gopher
#48
$ 80 per month?

Pipe dream in this day and age.
 
SirJosephPorter
#49
OUR ROYAL PORRIDGE, my invention, we have it every morning, will keep one
satisfied for many hours, depending how large a serving one makes.


You are right about this, talloola, unprocessed cereals (not the junk one gets in a cereal box) is very filling and one doesn’t feel hungry for hours.

In our nearby Bulk Barn (it is an Ontario wide chain, if not Canada wide), we get muesli in it simplest form. It is mostly cereal, with just enough fruit and nuts to make it palatable (which is how muesli should be, those muesli boxes which proudly announce 60% nuts or 70% nuts, are really desserts and should be eaten as desserts, and not as cereal). It is also very cheap (certainly a lot cheaper than muesli boxes).


I eat a bowl of the muesli before I go on a day long hike. One bowl of muesli gives you enough energy (slow release of carbohydrates) for at least a four hour walk, you don’t feel hungry for 4 to 5 hours after a bowl of such muesli (mostly cereal). You don’t need anything else to eat until you stop for lunch.

Porridge or oatmeal is the same. It is very filling, nutritious and costs pennies (provided you don’t’ fill it up with sugar, honey or junk like that). Oatmeal has got its own, inherent flavour, which is drowned by adding sugar or honey to it. I like just a plain bowl of oatmeal, many times for lunch I have a bowl of oatmeal and that is it (with perhaps a banana).
 
Said1
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

$ 80 per month?

Pipe dream in this day and age.

That's roughly what I spend.

A few of my friends and I trade food quite a bit. It's not abnormal for me to trade a pork chop or two for rice or some other item. More often than not, we also share what we cook, if we cook something big. This is something my ex-husband started. Some of his friends needed to visit the food bank on occasion so he would trade some canned or sweet items for meat.

My parents used to buy half a cow or hog (really big pig) and do the same thing with my mother's sister once in a while. I remember being really excited about getting a pile of Mac & Cheese!
 
talloola
#51
I ate plain porridge for about 40 years, it took my daughters to show me how to
make it more interesting, now I make 'royal porridge', never plain again, unless
I have no choice.
 
sirlorenzo
#52
If college taught me anything, it was cheap living. My favorite money saving food choice was to buy a giant box of Mr. Noodles (they work out to less than 30cents a pack) cook one or two of those up, and add in some frozen veggies which are also very cheap. If you're really poor you can omit the veggies, but as soon as the scurvey sets in I'd recommend throwing a few in.
 

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