Becoming Canadian from the US

Thomas Lee
#1
Im trying to find out how difficult it would be to become a permanent Resident of Ontario Canada?? I have met a beautiful woman in the GTA.We have fallen in Love and things look great.We have talked about getting Married but trying to become a citizen has baffled me.If anyone out there can shed some light on the easiest process to migrate I would greatly appreciate it.I currently live in California.
 
Tyr
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by Thomas LeeView Post

Im trying to find out how difficult it would be to become a permanent Resident of Ontario Canada?? I have met a beautiful woman in the GTA.We have fallen in Love and things look great.We have talked about getting Married but trying to become a citizen has baffled me.If anyone out there can shed some light on the easiest process to migrate I would greatly appreciate it.I currently live in California.


Move to Canada first and then apply. she'll have to sponsor you
 
SirJosephPorter
#3
Come to Canada as a visitor and then get married here in Ontario. Then you can apply for immigrant visa. With your wife a citizen of Canada, it should be fairly easy (you may have to satisfy the immigration authorities that your marriage is genuine and not a marriage of convenience).

You won’t have to leave the country while they are considering your application. I think it should be a speedy process, without any hassles.

But I think the easiest, quickest way would be to come here, get married (you can get married in the registry office, and then perhaps have a regular wedding ceremony later on) and apply for immigrant visa.
 
Ron in Regina
#4
It's not fast. It's not cheap. It's not very simple. My Daughter-in-Law
is going through the process. If it wasn't this way, the following site
wouldn't exist: Immigration Limbo! : The store for new Canadian residents (external - login to view)#

At this site, you can purchase items like this:

 
Ron in Regina
#5
Don't let me put you off Man! Just letting you know it's not
just a walk in the park. There are a pile of forum sites that
deal with exactly what you're asking, set up by people in the
immigration process for people in the immigration process.

You'll find guidance there in how to correctly fill out forms, &
many of the "do's & don't" that might set you back. Good Luck.
 
SirJosephPorter
#6
Ron, this looks like a straightforward case to me, with no complications. I donít see why it has to be difficult.

Once he marries a Canadian citizen, I think by law the immigration cannot keep him out. It is no longer about his right to live in Canada, but abut his wifeís right to marry whoever she wants. As I mentioned before, the only thing is he may have to convince them that the marriage is genuine. Other than that, I see no problems.


In his case, I would come to Canada, marry my wife and then ask the Canadian immigration authorities about the procedure to apply for immigration, forget about the websites.
 
darkbeaver
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

Ron, this looks like a straightforward case to me, with no complications. I donít see why it has to be difficult.

Once he marries a Canadian citizen, I think by law the immigration cannot keep him out. It is no longer about his right to live in Canada, but abut his wifeís right to marry whoever she wants. As I mentioned before, the only thing is he may have to convince them that the marriage is genuine. Other than that, I see no problems.


In his case, I would come to Canada, marry my wife and then ask the Canadian immigration authorities about the procedure to apply for immigration, forget about the websites.

What do you mean it looks like a straightforward case. You haven't even asked him if he is a terrorist. I think it's premature to roll out the red carpet at this stage in your investigation. We have to protect Canadian jobs as well.
 
SirJosephPorter
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

What do you mean it looks like a straightforward case. You haven't even asked him if he is a terrorist. I think it's premature to roll out the red carpet at this stage in your investigation. We have to protect Canadian jobs as well.

I am assuming that he is a US citizen, not in trouble with law of any kind and simply wants to marry a Canadian because he is in love with her.
 
darkbeaver
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

I am assuming that he is a US citizen, not in trouble with law of any kind and simply wants to marry a Canadian because he is in love with her.

This is covered in spot the terrorist 101. You're obviously a fine upstanding kind trusting citizen who thinks the best of everyone who wants to come to Canada and marry one of our extremely beautiful women for love. It sounds innocent enough I know, but the diabolical Taleban and Iranian tanks crews have been slipping accross our border for years this way. Maybe you should inquire about some ID, two pieces I think is standard, like a drivers license and a button or something. If it's too easy to get here he may think less of us. I'm a romantic too but these are trying times.

My sister lives in Toronto, I'm very suspicious.
 
Ron in Regina
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

Ron, this looks like a straightforward case to me, with no complications. I donít see why it has to be difficult.

Once he marries a Canadian citizen, I think by law the immigration cannot keep him out. It is no longer about his right to live in Canada, but abut his wifeís right to marry whoever she wants. As I mentioned before, the only thing is he may have to convince them that the marriage is genuine. Other than that, I see no problems.


In his case, I would come to Canada, marry my wife and then ask the Canadian immigration authorities about the procedure to apply for immigration, forget about the websites.


My Son is from Saskatchewan. His Wife is from Utah. They married in
Utah last spring. They started the immigration process at that time. She
has lived in Canada since that time. She's still waiting for the "Stage One"
approval (hopefully soon) so that she can get a temporary SIN# and then
purchase a work visa, as she is bored silly. They are a couple of thousand
dollars into the process so far. Legally, she can't work until that point. She
hasn't either as, if she did and got caught, she's out with no second chance.
If She (or He) was to get arrested for something, she's out with no second
chance.

Her file is moving very quickly. I've a Buddy that owns a consulting company
that specializes in immigration services. His guidance has helped my Daughter
-in-Law avoid many of the pitfalls that bog several others down. Even what
you would consider a straightforward case is not simple, fast, or inexpensive.
That's just the way it is. I'm told though that it would be easier for my Daughter
-in-Law to immigrate into Canada than it would be for my Son into Immigrate
to the USA.


Praxius and his Fiancee sound like a straightforward case to me too. I wonder
how many years they're into the process? Maybe he'll wade into this Thread too.
 
Thomas Lee
#11
I really appreciate all the advice I've gotten so far and more would be appreciated. I do understand about the turmoil our world is going through at this moment,but rest assured I am not out for anything other then to be with my Lady and be productive in Canada.So with that in mind,I have been to Canada several times and really Love it up there.There seems to be so much going on.I cant wait to move there,so more info would be great.Thanks again
 
Diarygirl
#12
Consider the advice given Thomas ....it's a good possibility that you would be fine after the marriage as long as you are productive financially and have no criminal background nor any major health issues. All the best! Let us know what happens when you do decide....I'd like to know!
 
SirJosephPorter
#13
Ron, your daughter-in-laws application is presumably being handled by the Consulate in Utah (Salt Lake City?).

Now, I am not an immigration expert, but it seems to me if she had come to Saskatchewan, married your son there, her case may have moved more quickly. If she is in Canada but her case is being handled in Salt Lake City, everything is done long distance and that may be part of the problem.

If she had got married in Saskatchewan, presumably her case would be handled in Saskatchewan and it may have moved quicker.

Of course, I am only speculating, I am not an immigration expert. However, the best course seems to me to come to Canada, get married here and then apply for immigration. The potential immigrant (and more important, the Canadian citizen spouse) would have more avenues available to explore in Canada than in USA.
 
Ron in Regina
#14
I'm no expert on the subject either. Luckily, this guy is:
The Prince Albert Daily Herald: Business | Business serves immigrants (external - login to view)
All in all. Her file IS going along very quickly.
 
no color
#15
The timeline mainly depends on the office dealing with the case. My case was handled by the office in Buffalo. However my husband was in the US with me when he sponsored me to move to Canada. From the time they received our application, it took but a few months to get my passport request for my permanent resident visa. No interview was required.
 
Whitley
#16
It doesn't matter where you wed, It still takes a long time. Lucky you live in ON however.(I will get to that later) Do you have any college education? You can apply for a skilled workers permit. Immigrating to Canada: Skilled workers and professionals (external - login to view) to see if you qualify they have a test you can take at this link: Skilled Worker Online Self-Assessment - Education (external - login to view).

If you can obtain one, you can work and have your perminant resident application in process. (being young and haven't started college yet, I didn't qualify.)

You have 2 options when it comes to perminant residences.
1-Apply with in Canada Application For Permanent Residence in Canada - Spouse or Common-law Partner (external - login to view)
You cannot leave Canada if you apply this way, unless you have a family emergency. You have to live in Canada.
-You need to get a medical examination done by an CIC approved doctor, they have a list if you need it.
-You need a criminal record check. They are extreamly picky about this, you need a near clean record. (I can tell you how to do this aswell)
The cost? Well the application fees, $1040. the medical exam $250+cab fare and the crimal record check $18+$15 for the fingerprints and at least $20 for all the mailing.
Health Care? Well you have to have first stage approval (AIP)before you can apply for an open work permit(which applies to me, meaning I can work wherever with out needing a job offer.) and health care. Unless you live in ON. You can apply for your health card as soon as you apply (or so I am told you would need to call the office you get health cards from)

The alternative route
Outside Canada Application
Application to Sponsor a Member of the Family Class (external - login to view)
You can go back and forth but you have to live in your home county. And have everything done in your home country. i.e Medical exam. (its hard to find a CIC approved doctor outside of Canada.)


And how long does all this take?
Application Processing Times: A Look at New Service Initiatives at CIC (external - login to view)
You can compare both, and this is assuming everything goes smoothly. I have read about cases that have been in processing for years and I am ahead of them.


I hope this answered some of your questions.
 
Whitley
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

Ron, your daughter-in-laws application is presumably being handled by the Consulate in Utah (Salt Lake City?).

Now, I am not an immigration expert, but it seems to me if she had come to Saskatchewan, married your son there, her case may have moved more quickly. If she is in Canada but her case is being handled in Salt Lake City, everything is done long distance and that may be part of the problem.

If she had got married in Saskatchewan, presumably her case would be handled in Saskatchewan and it may have moved quicker.

Of course, I am only speculating, I am not an immigration expert. However, the best course seems to me to come to Canada, get married here and then apply for immigration. The potential immigrant (and more important, the Canadian citizen spouse) would have more avenues available to explore in Canada than in USA.


No I applied in Canada, So its processed in Canada. Utah doesn't have a Canadian immigration office, the only one I am aware of is the one in buffalo and I would have to go there if they needed to interview me and that wasn't something I wanted to do. As I stated before it does not matter where you get married, you could be married in China and it wouldn't matter.
 
SirJosephPorter
#18
Health Care? Well you have to have first stage approval (AIP)before you can apply for an open work permit(which applies to me, meaning I can work wherever with out needing a job offer.)

Whitley, so what you are saying is that if you apply within Canada, you can start working even before you get the immigration visa (as in your case). You obviously cannot do that if you apply outside Canada, I assume they wouldn’t even let you into the country until they give you an immigration visa.

So what I said earlier, the advice I gave to Thomas Lee (admittedly it was only a speculation, an educated guess) was right, you are better off coming to Canada as a visitor, get married here and then apply for immigration, rather than apply outside Canada.
Last edited by SirJosephPorter; Feb 9th, 2009 at 11:57 AM..
 
SirJosephPorter
#19
Utah doesn't have a Canadian immigration office, the only one I am aware of is the one in buffalo and I would have to go there if they needed to interview me and that wasn't something I wanted to do.

Whitley, now I find that hard to believe. Buffalo? If not Salt Lake City, I would think they would have a Consulate somewhere on the West coast, Los Angeles or San Francisco.

And why Buffalo? I assume they have a consulate in New York City. So they have two in New York, and nothing west of New York State? I donít think even a politician would work on such an absurd, twisted logic.

No, I think they very likely have a consulate in California (which is not all that far from Utah) and perhaps even in Chicago.

Incidentally, I lived in Salt Lake City for seven years, I studied at University of Utah. Where were you in Utah?
 
Thomas Lee
#20
I think fortunately I have a few things going for me.I don't have a criminal record and Im in good health.I also served many years in the Armed Forces and at the same time was a member of the Carpenters Union for 22 years.I hope these things will make me look a little more presentable to the Canadian Government.Im going there in March .I hope I can go to work.Im excited about getting started.
More info would be great,Im taking it all in and I hope the advice I've gotten so far is semi accurate . Thanks again
 
Ron in Regina
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

Health Care? Well you have to have first stage approval (AIP)before you can apply for an open work permit(which applies to me, meaning I can work wherever with out needing a job offer.)

Whitley, so what you are saying is that if you apply within Canada, you can start working even before you get the immigration visa (as in your case). You obviously cannot do that if you apply outside Canada, I assume they wouldnít even let you into the country until they give you an immigration visa.

So what I said earlier, the advice I gave to Thomas Lee (admittedly it was only a speculation, an educated guess) was right, you are better off coming to Canada as a visitor, get married here and then apply for immigration, rather than apply outside Canada.


Google, "Canadian immigration office in USA" and see what happens.
"Canadian Visa Offices" in the USA are Buffalo, Detroit, L.A., N.Y.
City, and Seattle. None are very close to Regina, Sk. Whitley, from
what I understand, if she applied in the USA, would have been assigned
to the Buffalo Office, for whatever reason...
Visa Offices outside Canada (external - login to view)

Once you're in the Immigration system, and after you have your Stage
One Approval, and then purchase a work visa, then you can work in
Canada. You can not work in Canada until you're set up to pay taxes
in Canada, if I understand things correctly. I'm no expert by any means.
I don't even pretend to be.
 
Whitley
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

Health Care? Well you have to have first stage approval (AIP)before you can apply for an open work permit(which applies to me, meaning I can work wherever with out needing a job offer.)

Whitley, so what you are saying is that if you apply within Canada, you can start working even before you get the immigration visa (as in your case). You obviously cannot do that if you apply outside Canada, I assume they wouldnít even let you into the country until they give you an immigration visa.

So what I said earlier, the advice I gave to Thomas Lee (admittedly it was only a speculation, an educated guess) was right, you are better off coming to Canada as a visitor, get married here and then apply for immigration, rather than apply outside Canada.

What I am saying is in reguards to American Citizens. They DO NOT need a visa to enter Canada. Actually, Americans can visit Canada with a passport and can stay for 6 months as a vistor. As Canadians can do in the USA. As I said before where you are married makes no difference in the processing. As long as you are married or have proof of a common-law partnership that is all you need to get started.
Did you not read the part about how he went and visited his fiancee did he have a visa? I don't think so. I also visited my husband with out a visa. Visas are for more foreign vistors, i.e Mexico, England, Russia, Iraq. Outside and Inside applications both have their pro's and con's it depends on what fits them. Not what fits you. Or what you think. Before you guess or make speculations you should really educate yourself first. Or leave it to people who know first hand about it, or even second hand like Ron.

As for the open-work permit and health care, First stage aprroval AIP basically is that you qualify for P.R. and they are just finishing up (which can take a few months or a year) so you can work and not have to keep waiting twiddling your thumbs any longer. Open-work permits and Skilled worker permits are 2 different things. You can have a Skilled work permit while you have a P.R application in processing and you won't have to apply for the open-work permit.

Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

Utah doesn't have a Canadian immigration office, the only one I am aware of is the one in buffalo and I would have to go there if they needed to interview me and that wasn't something I wanted to do.

Whitley, now I find that hard to believe. Buffalo? If not Salt Lake City, I would think they would have a Consulate somewhere on the West coast, Los Angeles or San Francisco.

And why Buffalo? I assume they have a consulate in New York City. So they have two in New York, and nothing west of New York State? I donít think even a politician would work on such an absurd, twisted logic.

No, I think they very likely have a consulate in California (which is not all that far from Utah) and perhaps even in Chicago.

Incidentally, I lived in Salt Lake City for seven years, I studied at University of Utah. Where were you in Utah?

Okay so I admit I was wrong about the American Immigration offices,I was told that Buffalo would have been the easiest office to go through, had I gone that route. Another note, I am not sure all of those offices handle P.R applications as in Canada not all of them do either. I am no expert on outside processing, because it did not fit what I was looking for in the terms of immigration, I wanted to be able to live with my husband, and outside immigration would not have allowed that as soon as I wanted.
As to where I lived in Utah, I lived in SLC aswell.
 
Whitley
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Thomas LeeView Post

I think fortunately I have a few things going for me.I don't have a criminal record and Im in good health.I also served many years in the Armed Forces and at the same time was a member of the Carpenters Union for 22 years.I hope these things will make me look a little more presentable to the Canadian Government.Im going there in March .I hope I can go to work.Im excited about getting started.
More info would be great,Im taking it all in and I hope the advice I've gotten so far is semi accurate . Thanks again

Did you take the eligibilty test that I posted? That will help you know if you will be able to have a skilled workers permit. What info would you like, I can help you find it. The CIC (Citizen and immigration of Canada) website is very hard to understand but once you start understanding it does get easier.
 
Thomas Lee
#24
Thank you Whitley,you seem to be well educated in this whole process.Again,I am going there in March and I will apply when I get there.I do want to work right away,but seems that I'll have to jump through a few hoops first.
 
SirJosephPorter
#25
Did you not read the part about how he went and visited his fiancee did he have a visa? I don't think so. I also visited my husband with out a visa. Visas are for more foreign vistors, i.e Mexico, England, Russia, IraqÖ. Before you guess or make speculations you should really educate yourself first. Or leave it to people who know first hand about it, or even second hand like Ron.

What are you saying here, Whitley? Are you saying that I claimed that Americans need a visa to enter Canada? I said nothing of the sort. Let me repeat what I said.

What I said was that it may be better to enter Canada, get married and then apply for immigration visa, rather than apply for immigration visa before coming to Canada. I said nothing about Americans needing a visa to come to Canada.

Outside and Inside applications both have their pro's and con's it depends on what fits them.

Quite possibly. However, the inside application seems to have one big advantage over outside application (as I see it). If you apply from inside Canada, you can start work before you get immigration visa. With outside application, you have to wait until you get immigration visa before you can come to Canada and start work.

Anyway, that is my understanding. Or do they let you enter Canada after you have got the stage one approval, but before you are approved for immigration?
 
SirJosephPorter
#26
I think fortunately I have a few things going for me.I don't have a criminal record and Im in good health.I also served many years in the Armed Forces and at the same time was a member of the Carpenters Union for 22 years I think fortunately I have a few things going for me.I don't have a criminal record and Im in good health.I also served many years in the Armed Forces and at the same time was a member of the Carpenters Union for 22 years

Thomas, I see a possible complication here. You say you served in armed forces; did you live any foreign countries, other than USA? If you did, they will check for criminal record in every country that you have lived in the past. Depending upon where you lived, the background check itself can take several months.

We know an Indian couple. They went from India to Britain, lived there for 20 years and then applied for immigration to Canada. When they were called for interview, he was under the impression that the process was drawing to a close (apparently interview is one of the last steps in the process).

He got quite a shock when he was told at the interview that the police inquiry will take four months, and they will have to investigate in Britain as well as in India.

So if you lived in countries other than USA, you may expect a prolonged police inquiry.
 
SirJosephPorter
#27
As to where I lived in Utah, I lived in SLC aswell.

Whitley, SLC was a great place to live, I enjoyed living in Utah. I was there form 1971 to 1977 (after that I and my wife moved to Britian).
 
Whitley
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorterView Post

As to where I lived in Utah, I lived in SLC aswell.

Whitley, SLC was a great place to live, I enjoyed living in Utah. I was there form 1971 to 1977 (after that I and my wife moved to Britian).

Yeah I wouldn't know what Salt Lake was like then, I wasn't even born.
 
SirJosephPorter
#29
Perhaps not, Whitley, but we can agree on some things. The weather in SLC is great. While they do get plenty of snow, it hardly rains in the summer, they have glorious summers. It rarely rains over there, in the six years I was there, I never owned an umbrella.

Mormons by and large a nice bunch of people (I donít know if you are a Mormon). I knew many Mormons (I even read the Book of Mormon while I was there) and they were nice, friendly people.

World class ski resorts (Park City, Snowbird etc.) are just a car drive away. The scenery is beautiful in summer (Bryce Canyon etc.). Why, even the Great Salt Lake itself is a world class attraction, even better than the Dead Sea (which we are planning to visit next year).

All in all, a great place to live.
 
JediGrrrl
#30
This has been amazingly helpful. Thank you for the links!
 

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