Driving from Winnipeg to Montreal?

mr.flibble
#1
I'll be driving from Winnipeg to Montreal sometime late September, early October. According to Google Maps, the best route is through the US which seems kind of indirect. What's the shortest way of going from Winnipeg to Montreal?

Thanks
 
s243a
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by mr.flibbleView Post

I'll be driving from Winnipeg to Montreal sometime late September, early October. According to Google Maps, the best route is through the US which seems kind of indirect. What's the shortest way of going from Winnipeg to Montreal?

Thanks

Wow! That's quite long. My longest drive was from Amherst Nova Scotia, to Qwealth Onterial. On the way there I had help driving. On the way back to Amherst I only had one, one hour nap.
 
RomSpaceKnight
#3
I would have thought the TransCanada would be shorter. Interstates and the 401 may be a bit quicker. I would do the TransCanada myself.
 
snowles
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by mr.flibbleView Post

I'll be driving from Winnipeg to Montreal sometime late September, early October. According to Google Maps, the best route is through the US which seems kind of indirect. What's the shortest way of going from Winnipeg to Montreal?

Thanks

It is very, very slow driving through Northern Ontario, for a few reasons. The first is is that it is really slow driving around Lake Superior between Thunder Bay and Sault Ste. Marie (that part of the drive alone takes more than 8 hours). The second reason is that there are a lot of moose on the highways, especially between Kenora and Thunder Bay. The third is, the highway is crap between about Thunder Bay and Sudbury. All of the highways, until you hit around North Bay, are single lane on shared roads, all in poor condition; it's really awful between Sault Ste. Marie and Sudbury.

If you are going to attempt the drive, the best way would be to drive to Thunder Bay by taking highway 11 from winnipeg through Kenora (get behind a transport if you want to feel safe from moose). There is an alternate route to get into Thunder Bay which will actually shave about 35 kilometers off the drive to Thunder Bay, and put you in direct line to the TransCanada, instead of driving through the city, taking the longer way; it's labelled quite clearly as the alternate route (and almost everyone takes that way). Then drive east about another hour until you get to a little town called Nipigon. Turn left on the highway (the road will be well marked as the Highway 11 turnoff to Hearst/North Bay) and follow highway 11 until you (eventually) get to North Bay.

It's weird, on the map, this way looks longer, but it's faster for two reasons: 1. it's actually shorter when measured and 2. the roads are brand new, completely straight, without hills, have few towns in between and really cleared out on the sides, so you can see anything that might be on the roads (though in a dozen trips, I haven't seen anything yet). I probably shave a good few hours off driving to Ottawa going this way, but be prepared to switch drivers, or to stop for the night in a place like Hearst. If you leave Thunder Bay at 7a.m. you can arrive in Ottawa by 11:30 or midnight, provided you don't stop for long.

After arriving in North Bay, follow highway 17 to Ottawa, then proceed on highway 417 to Montreal, which usually takes about 2 hours. I've done this trip a bunch of times from Thunder Bay, and it is definitely the fastest, easiest, and safest way to go; highway 17 between Thunder Bay and Sudbury is just too much of a headache.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you need more help, and I can make you a direction map using some software I have here which I found quite helpful. How many days are you planning to travel? My recommendation would be to drive to Thunder Bay in one day, then either right to Montreal the next; or to stop in Ottawa, get some sleep, and finish off the trip the next morning.
 
snowles
#5
Ultimately, if you go through Canada, watch for moose, especially in northern Ontario. Conversely, if you go through the US, watch for deer, especially around Minnesota. Both are rampant in numbers on the highways.

P.S. Google maps sucks. I'll work on a map for you and post it up here.
 
westmanguy
#6


According to Mapquest, Minnesota, and though Chicago and up is faster...

Interstates are always double lane, probably is alot faster.
 
snowles
#7
mapquest is wrong; Minnesota will completely slow you down.
 
snowles
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by westmanguyView Post



According to Mapquest, Minnesota, and though Chicago and up is faster...

Interstates are always double lane, probably is alot faster.

Where on earth would you go up from Chicago to? From what I can see on my map, it's at Lake Michigan's wang. There's no quick way through the States, you have to go around all five Great Lakes, and cross either in Detroit/Windsor (a nightmare) or go through New York. Either way is a waste of time; if the length doesn't get you, the border crossing will.
 
snowles
#9
Here you go Mr. Fibble, one pdf file of a map, handmade and complete with turn by turn instructions, to get you from Winnipeg to Montreal. These are superior to anything mapquest or google has to offer. You can download it here:

s6.quicksharing.com/v/8905928...tr_al.pdf.html (external - login to view)
 
snfu73
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by mr.flibbleView Post

I'll be driving from Winnipeg to Montreal sometime late September, early October. According to Google Maps, the best route is through the US which seems kind of indirect. What's the shortest way of going from Winnipeg to Montreal?

Thanks

Plane.
 
zewdy.g@gmail.com
#11
Hey,

I am driving down to Montreal early September and need details as I have no clue where Montreal is-so any help would be much appreciated folks.

p.s snowles, can you send that pdf map u had posted here, tried to download but its deleted

cheers
 
hermanntrude
#12
use google maps or google earth or any other map. that'd give you a good clue about where montreal is. Where are u driving from?
 
triedit
#13
Definitely take the US route. It takes FOREVER through Canada.

Even if you go the US way it still takes a minimum of 4 days.

I would say head south out of the 'Peg to Grand Forks, ND then east. It would seem to me that the logical route would be to take I90 through NY then head north again.
 
Unforgiven
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by (external - login to view)View Post

Hey,

I am driving down to Montreal early September and need details as I have no clue where Montreal is-so any help would be much appreciated folks.

p.s snowles, can you send that pdf map u had posted here, tried to download but its deleted

cheers

Google Earth
earth.google.com/ (external - login to view)

Mapquest
www.mapquest.com/directions/m...2z=&panelbtn=2 (external - login to view)

Easy Peasy
 
DaSleeper
#15
Triedit, I don't think that the U.S. route is the shortest......I have been to both cities from my home town. Winnipeg is about 17 hrs and Montreal about 10 from my place.
But to make sure I gave the problem to "Map Source" the map program for my navigator and it first gave me the route you mentioned for a total of 2865 kms. But then I tricked it into going through northern Ontario as a via point and the total distance turned out to be 2351 kms......a distance saving of about 500 kms so the other person was right in suggesting that route.
Just think of the scenery with the leaves changing colour as you travel through the wilds of Ontario
Last edited by DaSleeper; Aug 13th, 2007 at 05:45 PM..
 
triedit
#16
Ive been the "cross Canada" route, and the scenery is quite lovely. And with the limited speeds on the trip you get lots of time to take it in. It may be the shortest in km, but its the longest in time!
 
DaSleeper
#17
But without factoring in the time lost for two border crossings....you would have to travel at least 20 kms an hour faster for the whole trip to make up for the difference in distance.....and remember you loose 1.6 km for every minute that you are stopped if you are figuring the trip time-wise.????
 
snowles
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by (external - login to view)View Post

Hey,

I am driving down to Montreal early September and need details as I have no clue where Montreal is-so any help would be much appreciated folks.

p.s snowles, can you send that pdf map u had posted here, tried to download but its deleted

cheers

check your e-mail; i sent you a map that will get you to Montreal as quickly and easily as possible.
 
snowles
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by trieditView Post

Ive been the "cross Canada" route, and the scenery is quite lovely. And with the limited speeds on the trip you get lots of time to take it in. It may be the shortest in km, but its the longest in time!

I can guarantee you didn't go the "northern route" through Northern Ontario, which would have shaved several hours off of your trip. I've done the trip from Thunder Bay to Montreal/Ottawa at least a dozen times each way, and this way is much, much faster than taking the Trans-Canada. For time comparisons, we left Ottawa at 7 a.m. and arrived in Thunder Bay just after 10:30 p.m.. Going the other way that trip is almost always two days.

It's a very boring drive, especially in comparison to the other way, which winds around Lake Superior (which is beautiful in the summer), but if you are in a hurry to get somewhere, it's definitely worth it. The other way, while gorgeous, is ridiculously slow because of the hills and the curvature of the roads (it's usually about 9 hours from Thunder Bay to Sault Ste. Marie).
 
crtcsux
#20
I'm about to try the full northern route on a journey from halifax to calgary.

Once in Montreal, take Autoroute 15 north into the Laurentians, then continue to Val D'or QC, joining Highway 11 east of Kapuskasing, and then proceeding to Nipigon on Hwy 17. All sources say it is at least 50 Km shorter and avoids the awful Hwy 17 from Madawaska Dam at at the end of Hwy 417 to Sudbury.

I'll keep you posted....
 
Ondes
#21
Can I get a copy of that map everyone else was mentioning? My email is bluntedworm@gmail.com (external - login to view). So, with a trip like this, how long am I looking at? I saw someone mention at least 4 days!
 
ohdarlingx
#22
May I have a copy of the map as well?

Can anyone suggest good places to stay/rest and perhaps some attractions on the way? It's a long trip.

(By the way, I'll be doing Montreal - Winnipeg, not Winnipeg - Montreal, but I assume the map works backwards as well?)

My email is katml.nguyen [at] gmail.com
 
anthony1642
#23
I am driving from Montreal to Winnipeg tomorow Nov 5th, i have tried the google earth and it gave the route of going something like northern Qb, northern Ontario, etc... it seems very confusing. I'll be driving the first time on this route. Can someone help with easy instructions?
 
snevets
#24
Sorry to dig up an old post but do you have the map of directions from winnipeg to montreal. It would be much appreciated. snevets_j@hotmail.com (external - login to view)
 
TenPenny
#25
Must have been a LOT longer drive....a year and a half, and this thread resurfaces?
 
Spade
#26
The TransCanada over the northern shore of Lake Superior is longer than cutting through the States, but it is much more scenic and far less hectic. We've done it many times! Do the American run only after you're bored with the Canadian scene.
 
snowles
#27
Sorry to trudge up this old post yet again, but since I've had a hundred requests for the northern route map, I thought I'd post another rapidshare link for it. The map can be found here (external - login to view).

One of the few upsides to the downturn in the economy is that there are far fewer big rigs on the highways now, especially in northwest ontario with the collapse of the forestry sector. The northern route is not only faster than going around Lake Superior, but is now far safer, especially in winter weather (though it's certainly a lot more bland to look at).
 
snowles
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by OndesView Post

So, with a trip like this, how long am I looking at? I saw someone mention at least 4 days!

Nah, if you don't mind a lot of driving you can do the trip in 2 days. If you really pushed yourself the first day you could get to Hearst from Winnipeg in a day, and then a shorter day from there to get to Montreal. Even if you got to Thunder Bay in a day from Winnipeg (about 8 hours) you can get to Montreal by 2 or 3 am, assuming you leave around 7am the day before.
 
bobnoorduyn
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by snowlesView Post

Nah, if you don't mind a lot of driving you can do the trip in 2 days. If you really pushed yourself the first day you could get to Hearst from Winnipeg in a day, and then a shorter day from there to get to Montreal. Even if you got to Thunder Bay in a day from Winnipeg (about 8 hours) you can get to Montreal by 2 or 3 am, assuming you leave around 7am the day before.

I've done the trip between Toronto and Winnipeg several time when I was a young buck, did it in 2 days once and it was absolutely brutal. I would give Winnipeg to Montreal three days to do it realistically. The trip from Thunder Bay to Sault Ste Marie can be a long one depending on construction and weather.

BTW, any relation to late NDP MP Stanley Knowles?
 
snowles
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

I've done the trip between Toronto and Winnipeg several time when I was a young buck, did it in 2 days once and it was absolutely brutal. I would give Winnipeg to Montreal three days to do it realistically. The trip from Thunder Bay to Sault Ste Marie can be a long one depending on construction and weather.

BTW, any relation to late NDP MP Stanley Knowles?

It is brutal in 2 days, but if you take the northern route (or even through Lake Superior) it makes for either 2 really long days or 3 pretty short ones. Depends on the preference, I guess.

The northern route we're discussing would skip Sault Ste. Marie entirely; Hearst is about 1/2 the way b/w Thunder Bay and Sault (but much further north) so it's not as long as going around Superior from Winnipeg to Sault. Realistically, if you were to leave Winnipeg at 7am, you'd probably get into Hearst around 9-10pm. The second day would be significantly shorter - if you left at 7 am again you'd probably arrive around supper in Montreal.

Either way, it's a pretty boring trip scenery-wise... I don't think the trip from T.Bay to Sault is as long as it is mind-numbingly boring. There is quite literally nothing of interest between Thunder Bay and Sault Ste. Marie, unless you like A&W in White River and taking in the sights and sounds of Wawa.

P.S. I'm pretty sure no relation to Stanley, which is probably for the best since he'd be spinning watching his son, grandson and great grandson be Liberals
 

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