Yorkville in the 1960's (Vagabonds Mc)

soniq
#1
Hello im new here,im doing some research on yorkville in the 1960's can u guys give me some info plz? maybe some websites,documents..
and BTW i have already been to these sites:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yorkville%2C_Toronto (external - login to view)
www.peterrussellrealestate.co....php?page=5690 (external - login to view)
www.torontoneighbourhoods.net...entral/15.html (external - login to view)
www.boldts.net/TorL.shtml (external - login to view)

Thanks
Soniq
 
missile
#2
There's a good book on that subject,"Have Not Been The Same" The CanRock Renaissance by Michael Barclay,Ian A.D.Jack,& Jason Schneider[ECW Press 29.95] Lots of photos ,too.
 
karra
#3
Don't forget Rochdale College
 
Curiosity
#4
I am confused

I wrote on this topic yesterday and it isn't here.

Was it removed or is there another topic of the same title?

 
soniq
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

I am confused

I wrote on this topic yesterday and it isn't here.

Was it removed or is there another topic of the same title?

i posted 2 of this topic,thanks for the book guys
 
soniq
#6
i searched for the book review on the internet, it says Have Not Been The Same captures the spirit of Canadian rock from 1985 to 1995
i want Yorkville(which i didnt find anything about it in the reviews) in the 1960's not 1985 to 1995!
 
twotoques
#7
hey, how about a personal memory type anecdote?

We didn't live in TO, but some of my friends ventured to Yorkville one day/night to see what the noise was about. (ca 1965/66)

I remember hippies, bikers (I believe the colours said Vagabonds MC) sitting on their Harleys drinking beer, and hippies, cops, of course, long hair, beads, beards, tie-dye, mini-skirts, sandals, go-go boots, sunglasses at night, hippies, good lookin' women, go-go dancers in windows and hippies.

Hundreds of colourful, friendly people in a small space. It was amazing to us.

I vaguely remember a club called The Mynah Bird.

And the smell of...what is that smell?...Hey, that's marijuana...let's get some.

Oh, what a night.....

ps: Rick James and Neil Young worked at The Mynah Bird in the sixities.
 
Curiosity
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by soniq

Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

I am confused

I wrote on this topic yesterday and it isn't here.

Was it removed or is there another topic of the same title?

i posted 2 of this topic,thanks for the book guys

Soniq

I thought duplicate posts were a no no...

Do you want me to move my other post? Where is it?

Still confused.....sorry. WC
 
soniq
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

Quote: Originally Posted by soniq

Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

I am confused

I wrote on this topic yesterday and it isn't here.

Was it removed or is there another topic of the same title?

i posted 2 of this topic,thanks for the book guys

Soniq

I thought duplicate posts were a no no...

Do you want me to move my other post? Where is it?

Still confused.....sorry. WC

oh sorry i posted one in the off topic forums and one in the Ontario forums.
 
soniq
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by twotoques

hey, how about a personal memory type anecdote?

We didn't live in TO, but some of my friends ventured to Yorkville one day/night to see what the noise was about. (ca 1965/66)

I remember hippies, bikers (I believe the colours said Vagabonds MC) sitting on their Harleys drinking beer, and hippies, cops, of course, long hair, beads, beards, tie-dye, mini-skirts, sandals, go-go boots, sunglasses at night, hippies, good lookin' women, go-go dancers in windows and hippies.

Hundreds of colourful, friendly people in a small space. It was amazing to us.

I vaguely remember a club called The Mynah Bird.

And the smell of...what is that smell?...Hey, that's marijuana...let's get some.

Oh, what a night.....

ps: Rick James and Neil Young worked at The Mynah Bird in the sixities.

thanks man,so,so far i have found out that:
it was a hippy place,drugs,some famous singers are from there,famous shopping place(im not sure in the sixties tho)........thats about it......i hate writing essays!!
so less info!,it has to be 700 words,i only got a few lines,can somebody help me out?
 
soniq
#11
if it was my choice i wouldnt have chosen this subject,our teacher wrote each subject on a peace of paper and he put them in a bag then he told us to take out a peace of paper,and poor me got the hardest,there were easy subjects like the avro arrow,expo 67,CBC,hockey night in canada,......but i just didnt have enough luck

Oh another question! i will use the little information i have but i need ur help to give me some ideas,let me tell u about yorkville a little:


(((((During the 1960's, Yorkville was the center of hippy culture in Canada. Many folk musicians, such as Joni Mitchell, got their start playing coffee houses in this area. However, by the early 1970's, developers moved in and transformed Yorkville into a trendy shopping district for the upper crust
In the 1960s, Yorkville flourished as Toronto's bohemian, cultural centre, and was considered by some to be the breeding grounds for some of Canada's most noted musical talents, including Joni Mitchell and Neil Young.
At that time, Yorkville was also known as the Canadian capital of counterculture and the hippie movement. In 1968, nearby Rochdale College at the University of Toronto was opened on Bloor Street as an experiment in counterculture education
Yorkville is Canada's hippie heartland. Full of coffeehouses, boutiques, longhairs, draft dodgers, and freaks, Yorkville is a tourist attraction one where the tourists prefer to watch the excitement from the safety of their cars. In the village, the Beatle-haired kids, drugs and free love are rampant.
But the Yorkville hippies aren't all love and marijuana. , they hold a major sit-in protest in 1967 to protect their street from cops, tourists and fume-belching cars. They want to preserve their island of co-operation and love from the violence erupting in cities across the United States. But the Yorkville uprising story doesn't begin with a sit-in; it begins with a chair-in.
Home to Bohemians in the 1950s and hippies in the 1960s.)))))))

i have to do a 5 paragraph essay an essay has 3parts: 1)intro, 2)body(3 arguements that begin with a topic sentence that provides transition and link,and states the ideas supporting the thesis),3)conclusion i need help on the thesis statement and the body arguements(i need 3),u guys got any ideas?
BTW: u might think im very lazy but believe me i got no idea what to do.
__________________
BTW,the info is unedited
 
missile
#12
Sorry about suggesting the wrong book! Try this one,instead.."Before The Gold Rush" Nicholas Jennings[Penguin 1998]16.99 Nearly the entire book is on the early Toronto music scene.
 
DocStillRocks
#13
Regarding Yorkville during the 60's...I was there, in the movement, the hippie scene, the music scene, the sit-ins, the love-ins, the 12 hour fantastic concerts at Varsity and so on. I frequented all the coffee houses, but spend most of my time at The Night Owl listeneing to the great sounds of Bob Smith and his band The Rock Show of the Yeomen. Great memories. I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have.
 
marygaspe
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by DocStillRocksView Post

Regarding Yorkville during the 60's...I was there, in the movement, the hippie scene, the music scene, the sit-ins, the love-ins, the 12 hour fantastic concerts at Varsity and so on. I frequented all the coffee houses, but spend most of my time at The Night Owl listeneing to the great sounds of Bob Smith and his band The Rock Show of the Yeomen. Great memories. I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have.


I remember Bob Smith and his band. Do you remember a band called The Electric Orange? My now husband, then my boyfriend, was quite into the scene at the time. What a time it was!We were so into the Catholic Charismatic movement too. In University we talked about how we would make it all better. But did we? I don't think so. An old friends of ours, from those days, recently was over for dinner and made the comment that we are living in the type of society we dreamed of than, and we were wrong. Makes one think.
 
mapleleafgirl
#15
my take on those hippies was what they wanted was a world where they could do as they wanted without being responsible for anything.
 
DocStillRocks
#16
Gosh Mary what a beautiful surprise to hear from someone out there in Cyber Space remember Bob. I'm trying to remember the Electric Orange -- great name for those times! I remember Luke and The Appostles, The Ugly Duckings at Charlie Browns, Edward Bear.
Bob is a beautiful guy who still lives on in my heart. He and I became good friends; we went to High School together - sadly Bobby died in 1993. He'd had a stroke at 28, blew out his guitar hand, taught English and Drama in Brampton, and attended dialysis 3 times a week for years. I used to go with him to kill the time for him. I miss him so much. I'll never forget those great Yorkville Days.
I myself became a professional musician for 15 years and Bob came to my gigs!! Then I moved out to Vancouver and became a doctor; I'm turning 59 this year and I'm back in the studio working on an album. It's been quite a trip!!! (to say the least)
 
DocStillRocks
#17
Where you there? You had to be there on the inside of it to really get what was going on.
We wanted peace, and we believed loving all our brothers and sisters was the only way to get world peace. We had non-violent protests against american foreign policy in Viet Nam. I personally held young boys who had just gotten back from Nam in my arms as they cried out in insanity and pain. The National Guard openned up on university students killing 4 at Kent State. It was a time of choosing peace, flowers, love, song that melded us together.
Just like today, things have gone to hell in the world, and this old former "hippie" is turning 59, is a doctor, and my heart and mind remember and respect what we were trying to do.
Problem is, as John Lennon said, we won't "Give Peace a Chance."
I'm so grateful I was there and got to experience all that was going on; it was meaningful and often really beautiful, and it brought us all together, where even strangers were considered and treated like family.
 
mapleleafgirl
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by DocStillRocksView Post

Where you there? You had to be there on the inside of it to really get what was going on.
We wanted peace, and we believed loving all our brothers and sisters was the only way to get world peace. We had non-violent protests against american foreign policy in Viet Nam. I personally held young boys who had just gotten back from Nam in my arms as they cried out in insanity and pain. The National Guard openned up on university students killing 4 at Kent State. It was a time of choosing peace, flowers, love, song that melded us together.
Just like today, things have gone to hell in the world, and this old former "hippie" is turning 59, is a doctor, and my heart and mind remember and respect what we were trying to do.
Problem is, as John Lennon said, we won't "Give Peace a Chance."
I'm so grateful I was there and got to experience all that was going on; it was meaningful and often really beautiful, and it brought us all together, where even strangers were considered and treated like family.


didnt have to be there to see the kind of lifestyle the hippies created. thats kinda where we are at now, a world where everybody has to do their own thing. nice one you guys gave to us. now we got guys who dont want to know their children, homosexuals getting married, drug and sex abuse and crime like crazy. yeah, nice byproduct of the 60's. just an excuse to not do anything and take dope, thats what the hippie thing was really about. we studied that period in school and our teacher said most hippies were losers who had no responsibility and who just wanted an excuse to live like pigs and take drugs.great movemtn(not)
 
temperance
#19
Thats what they taught you --lol,Oh my jealous ,

I wasn't but a speckle in that era but my parents explained that it was more about being able to speak freely and learning about many things in life instead of just one path ,it was about acceptance and nullifying the classes --like upper middle low income

At least they weren't on anti depressants and lethargic like they want us to be today --no fight just calm and conform --let us run every in to the ground and sell you out "oh and give us all your money too "
 
marygaspe
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by temperanceView Post

Thats what they taught you --lol,Oh my jealous ,

I wasn't but a speckle in that era but my parents explained that it was more about being able to speak freely and learning about many things in life instead of just one path ,it was about acceptance and nullifying the classes --like upper middle low income

At least they weren't on anti depressants and lethargic like they want us to be today --no fight just calm and conform --let us run every in to the ground and sell you out "oh and give us all your money too "


We were naive. We were determined. And we wanted to see a free and peaceful world. As a generation, for the most part, we sold out and lost our idealism. but it was a time of artistic and intellectual advancement that is still being felt to this day.

The sad thing is, that when the 60's ended, nothing had really changed. The "establishment" was still in charge. The same corporate people of the 60's were still running thw show after this decade was over. We had long hair and we had more personal freedoms and expressions, but the poor were still poor and the rich still uncaring.
 
temperance
#21
I do feel that at that time you were heard at least --we aren't heard we are lulled ,feared into conformity and some how we cant band together --you were banded then and trust was rampant among you
 
csanopal
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by temperanceView Post

I do feel that at that time you were heard at least --we aren't heard we are lulled ,feared into conformity and some how we cant band together --you were banded then and trust was rampant among you

Banded??? They sure were, they were all stoned...Great revolutionaires!(sarcasm)
 
Curiosity
#23
I went back and looked up that earlier thread on Yorkville....there were only a few posts ... here is the link to the topic Soniq started before...

forums.canadiancontent.net/on...nto-1960s.html (external - login to view)

I thought I had lost what's left of my mind when this topic showed up again and my posts were gone lol.

Michael Kluckner - a great historical artist who did Vanishing Vancouver - also did a book called: Toronto - The Way It Was - his primary focus is on capturing historical buildings which are being torn down and replaced...and he wishes to preserve the old neighborhoods in the major Canadian cities. I think the Toronto book was published in 1988....have many of his books but I don't have the Toronto one...as I'm from B.C. and was more interested in his western city publications
Last edited by Curiosity; Feb 23rd, 2007 at 08:32 AM..
 
darleneonfire
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by marygaspeView Post

We were naive. We were determined. And we wanted to see a free and peaceful world. As a generation, for the most part, we sold out and lost our idealism. but it was a time of artistic and intellectual advancement that is still being felt to this day.

The sad thing is, that when the 60's ended, nothing had really changed. The "establishment" was still in charge. The same corporate people of the 60's were still running thw show after this decade was over. We had long hair and we had more personal freedoms and expressions, but the poor were still poor and the rich still uncaring.

The drugs are what ruined the image and the goals of this motivated generation. that was the one big failing of the overall movement. In gernal though, the 1960's proved a time when young people actually said "No", instead of just doing as they were told. For me that is the most significant change of that generation of people. Suddenly, regardless of your point of view, you had to actually think about what you were supporting or not supporting and be prepareed to defend your position.

Artistically, well, we are talking about the time when avant-garde became mainstream and The Beatles were re-inventing recorded music. It was an interesting time, that it was!
 
blenheimbard
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by marygaspeView Post

We were naive. We were determined. And we wanted to see a free and peaceful world. As a generation, for the most part, we sold out and lost our idealism. but it was a time of artistic and intellectual advancement that is still being felt to this day.

The sad thing is, that when the 60's ended, nothing had really changed. The "establishment" was still in charge. The same corporate people of the 60's were still running thw show after this decade was over. We had long hair and we had more personal freedoms and expressions, but the poor were still poor and the rich still uncaring.

Actually quite a lot was changed. The one that is most significant within the U.S is the end of the draft as a social tool. At the time the draft was set up to force people into certain roles
, so that if you worked in a defence industry you were deferred, if you were a teacher and taught a desirable subject (science or math0, you were deferred. if you taught music or English, you were not deferred.
The whole idea was to push people into "desirable" paths, after all we all know we need more scientists and defense workers, than we need musicians and philosophers.
Interestingly this was not what the military wanted. They didn't want all the people who couldn't make it in school, the ones who were in trouble with the law, to be punishment for not towing the society's line.
I came to Canada at this time from the US, for the obvious reasons. But my background was a little different, I had planned to go into the military, possibly as a career. But I came to the conclusion that the politicians were subverting the American political system and since you cannot speak out politically from within the military, I left my training program, losing my deferment, and "voted with my feet".
Now if you believed that somehow "free love" and the peace movement would end conflict in the world, then you were naive. And there was a lot of that going around, how else do you explain using the Hell's Angels to handle the security at Altimonte concert. Now to my knowledge the Bikers who handled security at Rochdale never engaged in behavior like the H.A.s did, but I might not have heard about it.
Even Rochdale had its rules. Grass, hash and acid were fine, but coke and meth were "verbotten".
From my point of view many people confuse what happened in Vietnam, the American Military did not lose the war, the politicians lost the war, and there was nothing honourable about how they got out and what happened afterward.
One of the resulting changes in the political world is how differently the decision to fight in Iraq was reached. Now some people will always say that the whole WMD thing was a "lie', but I don't buy that. Before the war everyone believed they were there. The fact that weren't found doesn't mean anything beyond the fact that they haven't been found. That they were there at some point is a given, for they had been used. I personally cannot see Saddam giving up any weapon voluntarily, so i believe that he still had WMDs, how many and where is another question.
There is probably a better place to continue this, so i will go to what originally led me here. I'm trying to remember the names of the msuic venues of the time. I remember the Riverboat, the Mynah Bird,The Rock Pile/Masonic Temple, The Zanzibar (on Bloor), The Horseshoe(country music on Queen), Victory Burlesque (Spadina), upstairs at the Brunswick house (dixie land and some times other styles). I think the Gas Works came later, but wasn't there a Penny Farthing in Yorkdale, and a Purple Onion near the village on Avenue? Any others you remember. I'm trying to recollect the period 1968 to about 1972.
Thanks in advance
Last edited by blenheimbard; Mar 24th, 2007 at 05:13 PM..Reason: ended post prematurely
 
mapleleafgirl
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by blenheimbardView Post

Actually quite a lot was changed. The one that is most significant within the U.S is the end of the draft as a social tool. At the time the draft was set up to force people into certain roles
, so that if you worked in a defence industry you were deferred, if you were a teacher and taught a desirable subject (science or math0, you were deferred. if you taught music or English, you were not deferred.
The whole idea was to push people into "desirable" paths, after all we all know we need more scientists and defense workers, than we need musicians and philosophers.
Interestingly this was not what the military wanted. They didn't want all the people who couldn't make it in school, the ones who were in trouble with the law, to be punishment for not towing the society's line.
I came to Canada at this time from the US, for the obvious reasons. But my background was a little different, I had planned to go into the military, possibly as a career. But I came to the conclusion that the politicians were subverting the American political system and since you cannot speak out politically from within the military, I left my training program, losing my deferment, and "voted with my feet".
Now if you believed that somehow "free love" and the peace movement would end conflict in the world, then you were naive. And there was a lot of that going around, how else do you explain using the Hell's Angels to handle the security at Altimonte concert. Now to my...

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
mary dosent come here anymore. but honestly, your geneation and those hippies were messed up. too many drugs to make any changes. people are still hungry and looking for food, and it dosent seem like we have peace and love..so what was the point except a bunch of people who didnt want to conform.
 
snfu73
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by mapleleafgirlView Post

mary dosent come here anymore. but honestly, your geneation and those hippies were messed up. too many drugs to make any changes. people are still hungry and looking for food, and it dosent seem like we have peace and love..so what was the point except a bunch of people who didnt want to conform.

We definitly don't have peace and love when you are around, that's fer sure.
 
blenheimbard
#28
What was accomplished? The US government moved from a situation where it assumed that the populace would go for any policy if it waved the flag hard enough, and it discontinued a really horrible draft policy, by which it attempted to drive people into certain life patterns and career choices.
Now did it end war and bring world wide peace, no. But it did make a difference in how the system works. Is it perfect, no, but the world is not a perfect place either. Are you under the impression that if the hippies hadn't done drugs there wouldn't be hungry people in the world? i don't really think you can draw that causal relationship.
mapleleaf girl you really need to look a little closer at what happened, and what the results are. Don't expect the whole world to change, change doesn't work that way. It sounds like you are looking for an easy way to dismiss working to effect change, simply because the changes we hoped to make weren't achievable.
Now if you have figured out a way to make sure no one goes hungry, I would like to hear it. But be forewarned, I no longer have stars in my eyes. Things that work well theoretically, frequently don't work in life. Take Marxism for instance. A total disaster. It ignored one of the basic laws of the universe.
No matter how many votes you get you can't repeal gravity (atleast not yet), nor has any one managed to veto Murphy's law(s), and you ignore "tanstaafl", there is always a bill. Anything we choose to do as a society we will have to pay for it, not always in ways we anticipate. All the projects of the "Just Society" ended up with a huge bill, like the double digit inflation which ruined a lot of people's lives.
Given a few years experience of dealing with the world I don't believe we can legislate away homelessness or war. War would be fairly easy if everyone could agree on a basis for working together, but that isn't going to happen. Can you see the Islamic fundamentalists agreeing with any Western (liberal or conservative) ideal of freedom? Everything we take for granted, tolerance of others, freedom of choice, is anathema to their concept of a "holy" life.
Homelessness? I have met enough of the homeless to know that while their are some real tragedies, there are a lot of these people who are incapable of maintaining a normal life and living with other people. Now a lot of these people used to live in institutions like 666 Queen St. in Toronto, but we decided that it was unfair to keep them locked up, so we did away with the people "warehouses", and guess what. Most of these people can't live with others, some of them can't even live with the fairly basic rules of a "shelter". In days past a lot of these people would have moved to the frontier, away from other people, a lot of our "pioneers" were people who couldn't abide to live close enough to hear another person's ax.
In the settled countries we had "debtors prisons" and workhouses for the people who couldn't cope with the economy. And the reality is our "poor" are far better off than the "poor" in most of the world.
Are we to assume because one solution didn't work that we are to give up looking for solutions? the young should all be liberals, they should always be looking for solutions, as you get older you get more conservative, as you realize how ill-formed solutions can gum up the works.
keep thinking and keeep working
maybe you will be the one to come up a solution that works.

[tanstaafl= "there ain't no such thing as a free lunch"]
 
Rick Martin
#29
Neil Young worked at Coles Bookstore on Young St. when I lived in Yorkville 1n 1965.
Joh Kay of SteppenWolf also hung out in Yorkville in the early 60s. Bob Dylan playued at the Riverboat and Lighthouse played at a club called Boris's. I still have my membership card from there. The Ugly Ducklings played at The Myna Bird. What a great time it was..................

Quote: Originally Posted by twotoquesView Post

hey, how about a personal memory type anecdote?

We didn't live in TO, but some of my friends ventured to Yorkville one day/night to see what the noise was about. (ca 1965/66)

I remember hippies, bikers (I believe the colours said Vagabonds MC) sitting on their Harleys drinking beer, and hippies, cops, of course, long hair, beads, beards, tie-dye, mini-skirts, sandals, go-go boots, sunglasses at night, hippies, good lookin' women, go-go dancers in windows and hippies.

Hundreds of colourful, friendly people in a small space. It was amazing to us.

I vaguely remember a club called The Mynah Bird.

And the smell of...what is that smell?...Hey, that's marijuana...let's get some.

Oh, what a night.....

ps: Rick James and Neil Young worked at The Mynah Bird in the sixities.

 
Rick Martin
#30
Yes great book about the music scene in Yorkville in the 60s. Very accurate and the only book I've found on the Yorkville scene. I was at the sitin when we tried to have the street closed to cars on the weekends. Putting up draft dogers who came up from the US to avoid the Vietnam War. You will also fing some information in Neil's book [Neil and Me].


Quote: Originally Posted by missileView Post

Sorry about suggesting the wrong book! Try this one,instead.."Before The Gold Rush" Nicholas Jennings[Penguin 1998]16.99 Nearly the entire book is on the early Toronto music scene.

 

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