Revolution on the Nile, happening now, Feb 2011


dumpthemonarchy
#1
First it was peaceful protest,called like a rock concert on Wednesday, they called for fair elections and a retraction of the hated emergency law that suspends the rule of law and human rights which allows torture. Then govt reactionaries and thugs show their true colours and attack the protestors.

Now, there are running battles on the streets, thousands injured, hundreds dying. Egypt is on fire.

There is no denying Egytians have a right to start a revolution for freedom and democracy. The USA and France had revolutions. Geopolitics takes a back seat to democracy and less oppression.

Aljazeera on the web has great coverage of the revolution.
 
s_lone
#2
Pro-Mubarak supporters have been attacking the peaceful protesters with horses and camels. What a bunch of cowards.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by s_loneView Post

Pro-Mubarak supporters have been attacking the peaceful protesters with horses and camels. What a bunch of cowards.

Very cowardly.

Now there are barricades and molotov cocktails being thrown.
 
darkbeaver
#4
The transition to democracy must be slow and easy. All our best wishes are with the Egyptian people, says Hillary and Barrack.
 
dumpthemonarchy
+1
#5  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

The transition to democracy must be slow and easy. All our best wishes are with the Egyptian people, says Hillary and Barrack.

Now they're with the Egytptian people, seeing Egyptians rising up and wanting to be free of American sponsored dictatorship. How long will it take for the fadign superpower to realize that the Cold War is over? Asian and African coutnries simply need less repression, which makes the world a safer place, probably even for Israel.

The momentum of the Egyptian revolution is likely unstopable. If the govt wants to show they support the people, they ought to suspend for good the emergency law which would permit the dismantling of the repressive security forces that support the autocratic ruling classes. Egyptians feel there is no level playing field, that the govt plays favourites and most lose out.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#6
They're holding the square and marching on the presidential palace. I heard that the Muslim Brotherhood has Christians in it. If that is true, regime change is very close.

The revolution continues.
 
earth_as_one
#7
link please. Marching on the Presidential Palace would be a significant development, but I'm not seeing that. The number of protesters swelled today, but the stalemate continues as people wait to hear the results of negotiations.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_oneView Post

link please. Marching on the Presidential Palace would be a significant development, but I'm not seeing that. The number of protesters swelled today, but the stalemate continues as people wait to hear the results of negotiations.

I saw this first on CNN, they showed a map of Cairo and I thought, good plan, always go on the offensive, defense is for losers. Hold the Tahrir square then take the palace. This is a time to take the initiative and never give it up. Sheet on toast, it's a revolution for crying out loud.

Then the demonstrators get a big time Google executive on their side, Wael Ghonim. Doesn't look or sound like a radical or Islamist hijacking at all is occurring. Poor National Post, poor Fox news.


Tomorrow we will march on the palace | "The people want to bring down the regime" (external - login to view)
Tomorrow we will march on the palace

Posted on January 31, 2011 (external - login to view) by admin (external - login to view)| 9 Comments (external - login to view)

The last remaining internet connection in Cairo (the one we have been using to update this blog) has just been shut down (11pm Egyptian time). Sources say all the mobile phone lines will again be cut off tonight.

But despite the media blackout a million man march has been organized for 9am tomorrow morning, from Tahrir square to the presidential palace.

Spirits remain high, everyone knows that the time of this regime is over.
 
earth_as_one
#9
I saw that too. That was about a week ago. But it didn't happen, although some of the protesters agitated for it. The threat was serious enough that Mubarak went to an undisclosed location. The Egyptian military made statements that they would use deadly force to prevent looting or destruction of national treasures including the antiquities museum and the Presidential Palace.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_oneView Post

I saw that too. That was about a week ago. But it didn't happen, although some of the protesters agitated for it. The threat was serious enough that Mubarak went to an undisclosed location. The Egyptian military made statements that they would use deadly force to prevent looting or destruction of national treasures including the antiquities museum and the Presidential Palace.

Wrongo in the Congo Mr Moonbase.

The dictator just spoke on the tube and he said he would "solve" the crisis. Typical anwer for an out of touch ruler. Mubaral is done like dinner. Now the protestors are marching on the presidential palace and state TV. This is it.

CNN is shockingly frank, they want democracy there and so do all sensible people.

Seliuman, Egypt veep just made a dotty speech. No specifics and useless references to god other nonsense. Nothing about ending the emergency law, supporting new parties and ending Mubarak nepotism. Fuel for the revolution.
 
ironsides
#11
Eyewitnesses on Thursday night said the Egyptian army had troops pulled out of many locations near the presidential palace in Cairo, where they had been stationed since the beginning of the ongoing popular uprising.
Sources said army tanks had disappeared from Salah Salem Street, which is near the presidential palace and President Hosni Mubarak’s residence.
They added troops had withdrawn before today's meeting of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces from which Mubarak was absent.
The sources opined that the withdrawal of the troops could be a warning to the president that the army may not be able to protect him if protesters decided to march towards the palace.
This came shortly after Egypt’s military announced Thursday night that it was stepping in an attempt to end the three-week-old crisis.

www.almasryalyoum.com/en/news...dential-palace (external - login to view)

 
DaSleeper
#12
The way "The muslim brotherhood" hopes it end.................

YouTube - Sheik Yousuf Al-Qaradhawi quotAllah Imposed Hitler upon the Jews to Punish Themquot



Maybe EAO's secret hope???
 
Unforgiven
#13
When is someone going to throw a shoe?
 
dumpthemonarchy
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by ironsidesView Post

Eyewitnesses on Thursday night said the Egyptian army had troops pulled out of many locations near the presidential palace in Cairo, where they had been stationed since the beginning of the ongoing popular uprising.
Sources said army tanks had disappeared from Salah Salem Street, which is near the presidential palace and President Hosni Mubarak’s residence.
They added troops had withdrawn before today's meeting of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces from which Mubarak was absent.
The sources opined that the withdrawal of the troops could be a warning to the president that the army may not be able to protect him if protesters decided to march towards the palace.
This came shortly after Egypt’s military announced Thursday night that it was stepping in an attempt to end the three-week-old crisis.
http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/news...dential-palace

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
The generals makes millions of dollars and can flee, the soldiers make a few thousand bucks a year and have nothing to gain from shooting their countrymen because they have to live in Egypt after the revolution. So they melt away. Hold the square, take the palace and take control of the media. The people take power.
 
ironsides
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by UnforgivenView Post

When is someone going to throw a shoe?

Takes a while: YouTube - shoe throw at zardari (external - login to view)
 
dumpthemonarchy
#16
The revolution occurred. A game changer. How will it affect Canada? Less guidance from above, less geopolitical game playing here. The world is in play here.
 
coldstream
#17
Having a revolution is one thing, living up to its expectations and governing is something else again. Let's hope the voices of moderation prevail.. but as often as not they are drowned out by those of blind ideology.. or ambition.
 
Cliffy
+1
#18
The one thing that gives me hope about this is that it was not a violent revolution. They usually lead to an even more oppressive regime. Hopefully there won't be any bloodshed. From what I have seen, the people have been empowered by the results of their actions and will not tolerate anybody taking power that does not have their best interests at heart.
 
ironsides
#19
Now they have to elect or if the army has its way pick another President. The one good thing is that the military promised to support all the concessions made so far. Still waiting for the general staff to give up their powers.
 
TenPenny
#20
It might be better for the general staff to keep the country somewhat under control until an election is held, but that is certainly something only the locals would have a sense of.

It will be interesting to see how this goes; remember when France was the backer of US independence.
 
earth_as_one
#21
I expect the Egyptian military to remain neutral and focus on stability while the political horse trading goes on behind closed doors. I hope the Egyptians model their new democracy after Nunavut which has banned political parties and require everyone to run as independents who represent their constituents. I doubt that will happen.
 
ironsides
#22
France was far more than a backer of U.S. independence, they insured our victory by being in the right place at the right time. Egypt is on their own and the whole world is watching.
 
Cliffy
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by ironsidesView Post

France was far more than a backer of U.S. independence, they insured our victory by being in the right place at the right time. Egypt is on their own and the whole world is watching.

Yup. That is because Marmaduke made off with 70 billion in US aid leaving the country bankrupt.
 
ironsides
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_oneView Post

I hope the Egyptians model their new democracy after Nunavut which has banned political parties and require everyone to run as independents who represent their constituents. I doubt that will happen.

In a large country like Egypt, that will only lead to chaos. But I do hope this ends peacefully, will it be tomorrow or years, or will it be just another more acceptable president appointed. Time will tell, now it is time for the Egyptians to rest and enjoy their victory.

Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Yup. That is because Marmaduke made off with 70 billion in US aid leaving the country bankrupt.

He won't get to enjoy it, accounts will be frozen.
 
Cliffy
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by ironsidesView Post

In a large country like Egypt, that will only lead to chaos. But I do hope this ends peacefully, will it be tomorrow or years, or will it be just another more acceptable president appointed. Time will tell, now it is time for the Egyptians to rest and enjoy their victory.

It is usually when they take a sigh of relief that the they get the shaft from behind. This is not the time for complacency. They need to more forward and direct the tide of events, not just let them happen. They let someone else make their decisions and they will get royally phuked.

Quote: Originally Posted by ironsidesView Post


He won't get to enjoy it, accounts will be frozen.

I certainly hope so. I hope Obama has the balls.
 
ironsides
#26
They already have a constitution in place, if they keep going there just might be the violence we all thought might happen. The only thing that happened was the President got run off, VP is now in charge and he is worse from what I read. They still have the Peoples Assembly and the General Staff of the military to get passed. Question still is will they give up their positions to a new peoples government?
 
dumpthemonarchy
#27
With the Google exec part of the revolution, it will have corporate overtones, which is good because Egyptians want to live a better life and don't see much success in politics-when that was the only way to get ahead. The military has thousands of business, all run by family connections. If you were an up and comer, but from the wrong family, tough luck.

It's a realignment, politics will take second fiddle to economics, but will always be important. The old geopolitics have crumbled, uncharted territory,
 
damngrumpy
#28
Now the real battle begins. The problem is in the Muslim world they don't do things like normal
people on the rest of the planet. Where we have societal approaches to government we may
indeed have uprisings and others coming to power. The ultimate goal is to be inclusive and
bring people together to form some form of democratic government.
In the Middle East they divide themselves into little tribes, and from there they foster the interests
of their own little special interest group like the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, and other such
divisive groups. In the end they tear the place apart and nothing is resolved until the next uprising.
Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Tunisia, Egypt they are all the same. That part of the world is still tribal in
nature and that leads to more instability. The only governments that make progress are the
repressive regimes like Saddam. Nothing has been resolved and the end result will be the same,
more dictatorship and fundamentalist rhetoric. Real democracy is as rare as hens teeth in that
part of the world.
 
TenPenny
#29
I don't think that's confined to the Muslim world.

We do the exact same thing here in Canada.
 
earth_as_one
#30
The Egyptian military controls Egypt. Mubarak and his thugs including the former VP are officially powerless.

Quote:

Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian president, has resigned from his post, handing over power to the armed forces and ending a 30-year grip on the largest Arab nation.

Omar Suleiman, the vice-president, announced in a televised address on Friday that the president was "waiving" his office, and had handed over authority to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.

Triumph as Mubarak quits - Middle East - Al Jazeera English (external - login to view)
 

Similar Threads

13
What is happening to Calgary!
by Ariadne | Oct 9th, 2007
0
Source of the Nile is redrawn by 66 miles.
by Blackleaf | Apr 1st, 2006
no new posts