Buck Applauds Hunting - Deer Carry Long Guns?


Spade
#1
CTV Winnipeg- Buck Pierce celebrates Hunting Day - CTV News

Good Lord! What's next after Hunting Day - Berry Picking Day?
 
Cliffy
#2
I have always advocated for designing a carbine that bears can employ. Equalize the playing field to give them a sporting chance. I see no sport in shooting defenseless animals with high powered rifles. Hunters should only be allowed to use a knife or a bow and their wits. If any animal is wounded and escapes, the hunter would have to be strung up by their balls for as long as it takes to retrieve the animal.
 
Spade
#3
Sports hunting in not sport!
ttp://www.huntingsports.net/ (external - login to view)

It seems Manitoba has followed former President Nixon's proclamation of 1972. Is this the gun lobby's work?
National Hunting and Fishing day this weekend - Tiger Weekly - Columbus, OH (external - login to view)
 
Cliffy
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Sports hunting in not sport!
Hunting sports > deer hunting, duck hunting, bear hunting, fishing, hog hunt, pheasant hunt,... (external - login to view)

It seems Manitoba has followed former President Nixon's proclamation of 1972. Is this the gun lobby's work?
National Hunting and Fishing day this weekend - Tiger Weekly - Columbus, OH (external - login to view)

Fixed the link to huntingsports.net for you.
 
Spade
#5
Thanks! Must've dropped an aitch!
 
relic
#6
I agree with you Cliffy,nobody "hunts"any more,If you can't shoot it out the window of a sixty thousand dollar truck,or from a four wheeler then your not "hunting". This crap of gathering every apple in the county to put fifty feet fron your blind,where you sit in comfort doused in deer ***,that's not very sporting.
Most modern rifles have so much power that,if you don't hot a major organ the hole seals up and the animal can live for days,having a nice slow death by internal bleeding.That brings up another point,nobody goes after a wounded animal,if it can make it out of sight,oh well there's lots more.
I don't know why anyone would bother hunting in this day & age anyway,have you seen the liver of a deer lately? When I was a kid,hunting with my father,if he got a deer{one you could eat,not a big tough buck}lots of times we'ed eat half the liver with the steam comming off it,now the liver is likely gray with spots.Yum
Sorry,kind of got wound up,I'll stop before I get into snares and stuff.
 
Colpy
+1
#7  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by relicView Post

I agree with you Cliffy,nobody "hunts"any more,If you can't shoot it out the window of a sixty thousand dollar truck,or from a four wheeler then your not "hunting". This crap of gathering every apple in the county to put fifty feet fron your blind,where you sit in comfort doused in deer ***,that's not very sporting.
Most modern rifles have so much power that,if you don't hot a major organ the hole seals up and the animal can live for days,having a nice slow death by internal bleeding.That brings up another point,nobody goes after a wounded animal,if it can make it out of sight,oh well there's lots more.
I don't know why anyone would bother hunting in this day & age anyway,have you seen the liver of a deer lately? When I was a kid,hunting with my father,if he got a deer{one you could eat,not a big tough buck}lots of times we'ed eat half the liver with the steam comming off it,now the liver is likely gray with spots.Yum
Sorry,kind of got wound up,I'll stop before I get into snares and stuff.

Well, I don't have a 60,000 dollar truck.
Nor do I own a 4 wheeler
I don't put out apples.
I don't hunt from a stand.

And I try not to leave a wounded animal in the bush. Only ever did (to my knowledge) with a coyote once. Shot it close with a .22.......in the head, and it ran away, never to be found.

We only get buck licenses.

I remember eating deer liver, in fact, my Dad loved the heart. We don't do that anymore.

And I am not a serious deer hunter, I do take a rifle and wander around with a license in my pocket, and if one decides to end it all by jumping out in front of me....well.......

As for big powerful rifles, you are wrong on that point..........

BTW, you are wrong about rifles. More powerful rifles are not more apt to wound.........in fact they are considerably less apt to merely wound, if loaded with the right bullets......but you have to hit the vitals. And therein lies the problem.......guys with the .248 Super Duper Extra High Speed Big Magnum Killer rifles forget a flesh wound is still a flesh wound, no matter how much you paid for the rifle. And they shoot at any deer hair they see.........and they never learn to shoot well.

Very few of these in the woods, actually.....but you do see them from time to time. Hunting has become such a difficult sport to get into that usually only serious hunters bother.....and they are usually pretty good.
 
Spade
#8
I agree with Cliffy as well.
Rant #1
The argument that hunters are the true habitat and wildlife conservationists is full of empty rhetoric (the polite phrase). The notion that to save them you need to kill them first is laughable!

Rant #2
Apologists who maintain hunting is part of a "traditional" lifestyle would be less hypocritical if they limited their support to spears and arrows!

Rant #3
Killing for "sport" makes you more mean than man! As a matter of fact, the bigger the hunter, the smaller the manhood!

Rant #4
Hunting day is a ruse to whitewash gun-control opponents credibility.
 
petros
#9
My truck is packed. Check! Tikka is clean and pretty as ever locked in her hardcase. Check! Alarm clock set for 5AM on Oct 1 Check! Wife prepared? Check!

I can't wait to feel the warm bloody guts after hatcheting through the pelvic bone and thrusting a sharp knife up the schincter thus opening the grain filled belly.

WOOHOO

Quote:

Rant #2
Apologists who maintain hunting is part of a "traditional" lifestyle would be less hypocritical if they limited their support to spears and arrows!

Primitive weapons is open as we speak. My brother inlaw (lucky bastard) got first arrow off and took my elk last week.
 
Spade
#10
Hey, long time no see!

YouTube - Monster Whitetails with Double Bull Archery

 
petros
#11
More like this.... using calls and pushing bush. No blinds or tree stands thanks.

YouTube - Elk kill bow hunting 35 yards



I wish I was allowed to hunt for geese and duck with a 9 iron. We get flocks of 100,000 snow geese that overnight on the farm feilds.

 
Colpy
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

My truck is packed. Check! Tikka is clean and pretty as ever locked in her hardcase. Check! Alarm clock set for 5AM on Oct 1 Check! Wife prepared? Check!

I can't wait to feel the warm bloody guts after hatcheting through the pelvic bone and thrusting a sharp knife up the schincter thus opening the grain filled belly.

WOOHOO

Primitive weapons is open as we speak. My brother inlaw (lucky bastard) got first arrow off and took my elk last week.

What caliber is the Tikka?

You like it? (obviously)

How is it scoped? (If I may presume.......my Dad would not scope a rifle until he was almost 70 and had cataract surgery.......peep sights only, and he was a deadly shot)

Speaking of which.....how does it shoot?
 
petros
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

What caliber is the Tikka?

You like it? (obviously)

How is it scoped? (If I may presume.......my Dad would not scope a rifle until he was almost 70 and had cataract surgery.......peep sights only, and he was a deadly shot)

Speaking of which.....how does it shoot?

Like it? I love her. I'm a bush hunter so scope is more of a burden so I went with the open sight option and .270 short. It has the balance and feel of my ancient Winchester over under that grandad gave me and I learned to hunt with.

The simplicity, machining and accuracy are unmatched. Smoothest weapon I've every fired.
 
Spade
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post


I wish I was allowed to hunt for geese and duck with a 9 iron. We get flocks of 100,000 snow geese that overnight on the farm feilds.

 
petros
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Looks like Jane Siberry fans at a folkfest. That requires a 3 wood.
 
Ron in Regina
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Primitive weapons is open as we speak. My brother inlaw (lucky bastard) got first arrow off and took my elk last week.


This is a Buddy of mine practicing Primitive-Primitive techniques a few years back:





I don't believe he ever got a chance to try these out....but that's probably for the best.
 
petros
#17
Never and I mean NEVER screw a with a MoE decoy deer. Who won?
 
Spade
#18
A large doe nut hits the spot?
 
wulfie68
+1
#19
I'm sorry but the entire anti-hunting tirade makes me laugh as much as the "hunters are conservationists" thing.

If someone wants to spend money (i.e. stimulate the economy through their purchases) on firearms, ammunition, gas, camping equipment and supplies, not to mention all the licensing fees associated with the activity, and in the case of non-residents there are also mandatory guides to hire, who am I to stop them? Oh jeez you mean I have to be a little more careful on my hikes through the bush for a couple months each fall?

Have we really got nothing better to complain about?

I'm not a hunter anymore: I haven't been for 15 years or so now . I'll admit I was never very serious about it when I did it: I enjoyed going out in the boonies with my friends and the possibility of bring down something bigger than a ruffed grouse was a bonus. These days I would rather shoot year round with a camera (cheaper and I don't need to be a good shot) but I still love the flavour of moose or deer when Dad gets one and I don't begrudge people the opportunity to get off their butts and go stomping around in the Great Outdoors, as long as they do it safely and responsibly.
 
petros
#20
Sask income from hunting and fishing as of 2006:

Non outfitted hunting (outfitted is a very high reveune source as well)

GDP Generated
$29,276,203.00

Total Employment income
$21,337,708.00
Total Jobs (FTE) 915.3

Sport fishing:
$ 53,667,170 GDP
1,516.6 Jobs


477,000 tourist strictly to hunt and fish per year.


http://www.environment.gov.sk.ca/adx....pdf&l=English

We'd be lucky to get 477 people out to watch Jane Siberry.

If you think that money doesn't go back into conservation it would be a mistake. To not maintain the animal populations would be a very bad economic and social decision.


Deer populations can get way out of hand considering their natural predators are gone and they are eating some of the best grain in the world.

Either we hunt them or we pull them out of the grills of our vehicles. I've hit 3 so far.... Odds are high the next one will kill me.

Since it's down to me or the deer I'll choose to keep the highways a safe way to travel and reduce overpopulation of some very tasty critters.



My American friends that come up from TX and NM will drop between $4000 - $5000 not including what the wives spend shopping for one week of the best hunting/fishing in North Am.
Last edited by petros; Sep 27th, 2010 at 01:12 AM..
 
Johnnny
#21
The link posted in the original article was written by someone who is obviously biased and makes one giant assumption. And that is that hunters are stupid men who have a testosterone problem. Get real, and out from behind your computer screen
 
petros
#22
Quote:

And that is that hunters are stupid men who have a testosterone problem.

What about the women? If they have more testosterone they have bigger boobs and more sexually agressive.
 
Johnnny
#23
i meant it in the sense

from the article
Quote:

The hunters looking for the best possible kill are typically adrenaline junkies that are looking for danger and excitement

Quote:

Often seen as an attempt to prove their manhood

i know many hunters who are good respectable people of society. Sure their are a few bad apples just like in any other feild of interest. To say they only go out to prove to their friends they have the biggest cock or piss the farthest is doing a disservice to everyone in the industry that supports hunting.

To those who whine and bitch about hunting get out from behind the computer screen and gets lives
 
petros
#24
Even in the hunter gather days of old we had twinks. They didn't last long.
 
Cliffy
#25
I have no problem with hunting for food, but I don't believe it is a sport and trophy hunters are weakening the herds by killing the dominant males, the breeding stock. Then many of them will get their balls in a knot because wolves are culling the herds of these weaker specimens. The only interest they have conservation is in making sure they have big bucks and bulls to kill. They want the wolves culled when it is them that should be culled. I have hunted out of necessity, but never for sport.
 
Johnnny
#26
Like i said how do you know cliffy? Do you have some magic crystal ball that gives you a special insight to everyones mind and psyche? I know tons of hunters who are content with doe, cow, calf and fawn..... Ive heard people talking about getting the BIG ONE, but i aint known anyone to go all primative and getting reckless in their pursuit for one. Tell me cliffy are you on another im angry i was born a white male mood?
 
petros
#27
Trophies or no trophies big game numbers are at level were culling is necessary Cliffy. Open moose zones in Southern SK are something that 40 years ago where already unheard of for 40 years. 20 years ago when they started to show up it was front page of the newspaper and feature on the nightly news. Today. 20 years later they are over populated. Even bears and cats are roaming the prairie again. Trophies aren't hard to come by and sell out hotels province wide every fall.
 
Cliffy
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by JohnnnyView Post

Like i said how do you know cliffy? Do you have some magic crystal ball that gives you a special insight to everyones mind and psyche? I know tons of hunters who are content with doe, cow, calf and fawn..... Ive heard people talking about getting the BIG ONE, but i aint known anyone to go all primative and getting reckless in their pursuit for one. Tell me cliffy are you on another im angry i was born a white male mood?

I lived in the forest in BC for ten years with the deer, bears and moose. I have found carcasses left in the bush with only their heads missing. I realize I don't know squat about the prairies and their wildlife stats, but I have met too many yahoos in BC whose self esteem is tied to whether of not they kill one bigger than their buddies. And I am not tarring all hunters with the same brush. I know plenty of responsible hunters, but I also know a lot of jerks.

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Trophies or no trophies big game numbers are at level were culling is necessary Cliffy. Open moose zones in Southern SK are something that 40 years ago where already unheard of for 40 years. 20 years ago when they started to show up it was front page of the newspaper and feature on the nightly news. Today. 20 years later they are over populated. Even bears and cats are roaming the prairie again. Trophies aren't hard to come by and sell out hotels province wide every fall.

I'm sure that is the case but I have a hard time wrapping my head around the idea of hunting being an industry. I lived with the animals and I have a lot more respect for them than most humans.
 
petros
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

I lived in the forest in BC for ten years with the deer, bears and moose. I have found carcasses left in the bush with only their heads missing. I realize I don't know squat about the prairies and their wildlife stats, but I have met too many yahoos in BC whose self esteem is tied to whether of not they kill one bigger than their buddies. And I am not tarring all hunters with the same brush. I know plenty of responsible hunters, but I also know a lot of jerks.


I'm sure that is the case but I have a hard time wrapping my head around the idea of hunting being an industry. I lived with the animals and I have a lot more respect for them than most humans.

Heads are take by ministry of environment for chronic wasting, TB etc sampling. They do random sampling in all herds all year round and leave the carcasses for scavengers.

If those diseases are transmitted to the cattle we eat then we're all screwed. Both man and hundreds of species of game.

Deer Head Submission and CWD Testing

Hunters play an important role in Alberta's CWD monitoring by submitting heads of harvested deer for CWD testing.
Step One: Deer Head Submission

Hunter CWD surveillance starts with the submission of hunter-harvested deer heads along with the geographic coordinates where each deer was killed in Alberta.
  • Depending on where in Alberta you are hunting, deer head submission for CWD testing is either mandatory or voluntary.
    • Be familiar with the CWD testing requirements for the area that you are hunting in.
    • For a map illustrating mandatory and voluntary CWD testing areas in Alberta, see Related Information below for CWD Freezer Locations (Deer Hunters: Assist Us With Our CWD Surveillance).
  • If possible, please do not shoot deer in the head, as this can damage the lymph node and brain samples needed for testing. A usable sample consists of the entire head but you can remove the antlers and antler skull plate and not damage the required tissues.
  • Please remove the neck just behind the head – so the head takes up much less space in the freezer!
  • Do not remove and submit only the brain.
  • For so-called 'European'; mounts, submit the lower portion of the skull, including:
    • Lower jaw
    • Tissues at the back of the throat, and
    • The part of the skull that contains the connection between the spinal cord and the brain
  • Keep the deer head frozen.
    • You can drop off the frozen head at any Fish and Wildlife office in Alberta (during regular office hours)
    • During fall rifle seasons there are 24-hour freezer locations where heads can be dropped off. See Related Information below for CWD Freezer Locations (Deer Hunters: Assist Us With Our CWD Surveillance).
  • Every head submitted for CWD testing must have a green CWD identification label fixed to it (see below).
  • The freezers contain bags and green CWD identification labels for you to fill out (bags and labels also are available at Fish and Wildlife offices). It is very important that you:
    • Fill out both sides of the CWD label, providing as much detail as possible regarding the location of the submitted sample (GPS, Sec/Twp/Rge, or latitude/longitude) in addition to the Wildlife Management Unit [WMU])
    • Provide your complete personal contact information, so that we can contact you with test results
    • Fasten the CWD label securely to the head of the deer.
    • Keep the bottom part of the label as your record of the CWD number that identifies each specific deer head.
Related Information
  • CWD Freezer Locations (Deer Hunters: Assist Us With Our CWD Surveillance) (external - login to view) - 2009 (1 page) A map and list identifying the current areas of mandatory and voluntary deer head submissions as well as the locations of 24-hour freezers in Alberta where hunters can drop off deer heads for testing during fall rifle seasons.
  • Attention Deer Hunters: Surveillance of Harvested Deer Heads for CWD (external - login to view) - 2009 (1 page)

    A poster outlining the current fall surveillance program, and instructions on making a proper deer head submission.
  • CWD Guidelines: Deer Carcass Transportation and Handling (external - login to view)- Oct 2009 (2 pages) Suggested precautions and guidelines regarding the transportation and handling of deer carcasses, specifically those deer taken in areas of Alberta considered at risk for CWD, or areas outside Alberta where CWD is known to occur.
  • Fish and Wildlife Office Contacts (external - login to view) A list of Fish and Wildlife Division offices in Alberta, including telephone contact information for each office.
  • How to Fill Out CWD Identification Labels (external - login to view)- 2010 (1 page) An illustration of how to fill out the green CWD identification label for each deer head submission.
Step Two: Deer Head Testing

Hunter-submitted deer heads are tested to determine if the harvested deer was infected with CWD. Results of tests are provided to the hunter.
  • All CWD laboratory testing in Alberta is conducted by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD).
  • CWD test results are reported to the Fish and Wildlife Division of Sustainable Resource Development (SRD) on an ongoing basis.
  • All hunters who submit heads for CWD testing will be informed by SRD about results on their deer.
  • Hunters who submit deer heads that test NEGATIVE for CWD can
    • Check their AlbertaRELM website for results 4-6 weeks after submission of the head (you will need your WIN number).
    • Watch for a notice of negative results sent in the mail.
  • Hunters who submit deer heads that test POSITIVE for CWD will be contacted directly by phone by Fish and Wildlife staff.
  • Ongoing public notification of positive cases in wild deer in Alberta is provided on SRD web pages. Summary of all CWD testing in Alberta is provided through the ARD websites.
  • Data collected from CWD surveillance is used to determine the geographic boundaries and magnitude of the disease in Alberta. These data also are used to support ongoing management as well as research done in conjunction with the University of Alberta to better understand this disease.
Related Information
  • AlbertaRELM (external - login to view) Get CWD test results for your harvested deer head. You will need your WIN number.
  • CWD Updates (external - login to view) Review this page for the following information:
    • Chronic Wasting Disease in Wild Deer in Alberta since September 2005 –A map illustrating CWD cases in wild deer in Alberta from September 2005 to present.
    • Statistics: CWD in Wild Deer in Alberta - A list of all CWD cases in wild deer in Alberta.
  • Monthly and Cumulative Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Test Results in Farmed and Wild Cervids in Alberta Summary of CWD testing in Alberta on the Agriculture and Rural Development website.

In BC Ecosystems Branch - Wildlife Health
 
wulfie68
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

I lived in the forest in BC for ten years with the deer, bears and moose. I have found carcasses left in the bush with only their heads missing. I realize I don't know squat about the prairies and their wildlife stats, but I have met too many yahoos in BC whose self esteem is tied to whether of not they kill one bigger than their buddies. And I am not tarring all hunters with the same brush. I know plenty of responsible hunters, but I also know a lot of jerks.

And when you found these carcasses did you report them to the Fish and Wildlife rangers, so they could at least attempt to catch the culprits or did you bask in your hatred of civilization, walk away doing nothing and make yourself a part of someone else's crime?

Leaving animals like that and wasting the meat IS a crime.

Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

I'm sure that is the case but I have a hard time wrapping my head around the idea of hunting being an industry. I lived with the animals and I have a lot more respect for them than most humans.

Well you were shown the Saskatchewan numbers, now multiply that by about 6 or 7 (maybe more) to include the rest of the Prairies, BC, Northern Ontario, Quebec and the Territories. There is a significant spin off there. If people lost that many jobs in another sector of the economy, the NDP and labour groups would be demanding bailouts and action by the gov't.

I'm not going to argue that there aren't any people that abuse the system, just like I'm not going to claim they belong to any specific ethnicity (I grew up in the bush in Northern Alberta and knew of poachers from various backgrounds) but there are two sides to this, like with so many things, and its not a black and white issue except to those who want to spin it into part of an agenda.
 

Similar Threads

12
So hunting with Guns is the same as gangs?
by ottawabill | Sep 26th, 2008
19
Jean Applauds Culture of the N.W.T.
by FiveParadox | Jul 10th, 2006
13
Buck Owens Dies at 76
by Said1 | Mar 26th, 2006
no new posts