Police Missing a Knob


Goober
#1
Now here is an officer that embarrassses other officers - Needs more training in dealing with the public

Toronto's 'Officer Bubbles' gains web notoriety - thestar.com

He's now known as “Officer Bubbles.”

YouTube - G20 Policing From Bubbles to Bookings



Courtney Winkels blows bubbles during the G20 summit on June 27, 2010, in front of police officers, including Const. Adam Josephs, who is now known as "Officer Bubbles."

Const. Adam Josephs has gained considerable notoriety after being caught on tape threatening to arrest a G20 protester for blowing bubbles.
 
bobnoorduyn
#2
Reason # 168 for me not moving back to Toronto. Some folks just can't handle the responsibility of having a badge and a gun, they can be scary, Robert Dczykansky's demise is a case in point. How many more have to suffer at the hands of authoritarians before we realise we are under threat of becoming a police state?
 
EagleSmack
#3
C'mon...she was blowing bubbles right in their face. Surely they are not harmful but her intent was obviously to antagonize and start trouble. I did not see them beating her.

That cop sounds just like people from Minnesota.
 
CDNBear
#4
Any unwanted or unlawful contact, with any substance, from water to spit, chemicals such as soap to perfume, is assault under the criminal, full stop. If you want the exact sections, let me know, I'll provide them.

If you can't wrap your heads around that, I pity you. The Officer was doing his job, within the bounds of the law.
 
petros
#5
She is pretty cute. If I weren't married, I wouldn't mind being Bubbles.
 
TenPenny
#6
I wonder if she was singing 'I'm forever blowing Bubbles'....
 
EagleSmack
+1
#7  Top Rated Post
I just wonder how they would feel wearing the badge and having someone stand right in front of them and start blowing bubbles in their face. The girl knew exactly what she was doing. She wanted to p*** them off and get some good footage for the INet.
 
petros
+1
#8
They could have been Dollarama Chinese lead based bubbles. Dangerous stuff ya know.
 
gerryh
#9
a little more in depth

YouTube - The Whole quotOfficer Bubblesquot Story Toronto Neighborhood Responds to G20 Policing

 
CDNBear
#10
Interseting video, still doesn't change the fact that blowing bubbles at someone is still a criminal offense.
 
lone wolf
+1
#11
Hmm.... The breeze should be charged for aiding and abetting.

One cop with attitude paints a target on ten good cops.
 
CDNBear
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Hmm.... The breeze should be charged for aiding and abetting.



Quote:

One cop with attitude paints a target on ten good cops.

Funny, the guy that spit on me years ago at a rally in Tdot, when I took offense to him burning a flag, thought the cop was being a fascist too, when he arrested him for assault. I didn't even know was assault, until the Officer told him it was.

Unfortunately for some people, the law is what it is. You can not spit at, pour, shower, throw, or otherwise apply any fluid, noxious or otherwise on someone without consent. It's called assault, full stop.

You may find it funny that an Officer has an issue with "bubbles", but where does it stop? This is how authority is broken down, this is where disrespect for that authority grows and starts to eat away at the fabric of society.

I would never be so ignorant as to say you should never question authority, you should. Vigorously and often. But to challenge authority is something altogether different and the authorities should react under the guidance of the law, in a just and lawful manner.

That is exactly what this Officer did, she heeded his warnings and there was no escalation. I take my hat off to both of them.
Last edited by CDNBear; Jul 17th, 2010 at 11:40 AM..
 
lone wolf
#13
Those ten good cops might say something to the effect of: "Miss, will you please stop blowing bubbles for a moment?" ... then go into the growly bear act if she persisted. Respect goes both ways.
 
CDNBear
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Those ten good cops might say something to the effect of: "Miss, will you please stop blowing bubbles for a moment?" ... then go into the growly bear act if she persisted. Respect goes both ways.

Ya, that's exactly what he did, he warned her. That's all that's required. Actually, that's not even required. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.
 
lone wolf
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Ya, that's exactly what he did, he warned her. That's all that's required. Actually, that's not even required. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

Confrontation begets confrontation. His attitude didn't diffuse a situation. It created one.

Funny little double standard there.... The law wants to stamp out bullying ... and give such shining examples.
 
petros
#16
If you are too slow to dodge a bubble you shouldn't be a cop.
 
CDNBear
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Confrontation begets confrontation. His attitude didn't diffuse a situation. It created one.

Huh? He told her that she was breaking the law, how is that creating a situation?

Is he supposed to stand there and be disrespected?

Is he supposed to stand there and allow himself to be assaulted, contrary to the criminal code?

I wouldn't expect an Officer to take that from anyone.

Quote:

Funny little double standard there.... The law wants to stamp out bullying ... and give such shining examples.

C'mon LW, I think you're being a little unfair in this situation.

That scene was already tense, the young lady was obviously part of the reason for the tension, he warned her, she acquiesced. End of situation.

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

If you are too slow to dodge a bubble you shouldn't be a cop.

Again, irrelevant to the law. Simply taking a swing at a cop is an offense.
 
lone wolf
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Huh? He told her that she was breaking the law, how is that creating a situation?

First step is the request to cease and desist. There's a psychology to this, you know....

Quote:

Is he supposed to stand there and be disrespected?

No.... Nor will he win any by threatening to escalate the situation.

Quote:

Is he supposed to stand there and allow himself to be assaulted, contrary to the criminal code?

She had stopped. He kept nagging. Somehow, I suspect the officer may be looking at some Police Act violations too....

Quote:

I wouldn't expect an Officer to take that from anyone.

No ... hey, one bubble stain on the uniform. Sheesh! What bubble is going to get behind his glasses. The lady cop's were on her hat. I mean ... where's the blind adherence to dress code?

Quote:

C'mon LW, I think you're being a little unfair in this situation.

I think the cop was one of those walking attitudes who invite confrontation.

Quote:

That scene was already tense, the young lady was obviously part of the reason for the tension, he warned her, she acquiesced. End of situation.

Not really. Was the fellow who voiced his offence with the cop's attitude a member of her gang ... or just someone who was genuinely offended - especially since he appeared like an older gent who may well be accustomed to the "friendly cop" image of yesteryear?

Quote:

Again, irrelevant to the law. Simply taking a swing at a cop is an offense.

Blind obedience to authority is somewhat offensive to some.
 
CDNBear
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

First step is the request to cease and desist. There's a psychology to this, you know....

Ya I know, that's why it's usually effective in ending situations without incident.

Quote:

No.... Nor will he win any by threatening to escalate the situation.

Huh? Stating the outcome is not threatening, it's warning against it.

Quote:

She had stopped. He kept nagging. Somehow, I suspect the officer may be looking at some Police Act violations too....

Are we watching the same video? She blew bubbles, he warned her, she stopped, the end.

Quote:

No ... hey, one bubble stain on the uniform. Sheesh! What bubble is going to get behind his glasses. The lady cop's were on her hat. I mean ... where's the blind adherence to dress code?

What exactly does this have to do with the law?

Quote:

I think the cop was one of those walking attitudes who invite confrontation.

Really, I didn't get that at all.
Quote:

Not really. Was the fellow who voiced his offence with the cop's attitude a member of her gang ... or just someone who was genuinely offended - especially since he appeared like an older gent who may well be accustomed to the "friendly cop" image of yesteryear?

Now you're making assumptions. This is not a Cop walking a beat here, this was during a rally where tensions had risen.

Quote:

Blind obedience to authority is somewhat offensive to some.

I agree, which is why I said...

Quote:

I would never be so ignorant as to say you should never question authority, you should. Vigorously and often. But to challenge authority is something altogether different and the authorities should react under the guidance of the law, in a just and lawful manner.

Questioning and challenging are two different things in my eyes.

I think you and I are not going to agree here today. I say we agree to disagree, what say you?
 
petros
#20
Did any of you notice the cop and the girl made a "contract" in which she screwed herself?
 
CDNBear
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Did any of you notice the cop and the girl made a "contract" in which she screwed herself?

I didn't, but I would like to.

What did I miss.
 
Goober
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Interseting video, still doesn't change the fact that blowing bubbles at someone is still a criminal offense.

And he over reacted - They ( All Offiers, Soldiers,Security Staff etc)were all briefed about being videod etc and not to be sucked into something that makes the Police come of as asses - To be watchful for these types of encounters -He blew it - Literally - No pun intended.

Did he feel the female Police Officer was not able to handle bubbles -
 
Machjo
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

Now here is an officer that embarrassses other officers - Needs more training in dealing with the public

Toronto's 'Officer Bubbles' gains web notoriety - thestar.com

He's now known as “Officer Bubbles.”

YouTube - G20 Policing From Bubbles to Bookings



Courtney Winkels blows bubbles during the G20 summit on June 27, 2010, in front of police officers, including Const. Adam Josephs, who is now known as "Officer Bubbles."

Const. Adam Josephs has gained considerable notoriety after being caught on tape threatening to arrest a G20 protester for blowing bubbles.

Ignoring the fact that a part was cut out between the first incident and the arrest, and assuming nothing else transpired between tapings, then I'd say the officer went too far in arresting her and could have chosen a nicer tone of voice.

That said, the lady was being provocative by blowing bubbles at them and certainly not being too respectful herself. It went both ways, but the lady blowing the bubbles was certainly not totally innocent herself in all of this.

Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Any unwanted or unlawful contact, with any substance, from water to spit, chemicals such as soap to perfume, is assault under the criminal, full stop. If you want the exact sections, let me know, I'll provide them.

If you can't wrap your heads around that, I pity you. The Officer was doing his job, within the bounds of the law.

I do agree he was well within his rights as per the law to arrest her for assaulting a police officer ad no sanctions should be imposed on him for that. At most he could get a talking to about his tone of voice, but that's about it. As for arresting her, he was well within his right to do that.

Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

I just wonder how they would feel wearing the badge and having someone stand right in front of them and start blowing bubbles in their face. The girl knew exactly what she was doing. She wanted to p*** them off and get some good footage for the INet.

Bad coverage for her, because in the end, I can still understand why that officer was angry and with reason. She was being provocative and did not bring positive coverage on herself. And then to mistreat the officers and demand it for herself seemed a little self-centred there. It made her come across as a spoilt brat.

And what exactly was she trying to accomplish? Exercising her right to assault another?

Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Those ten good cops might say something to the effect of: "Miss, will you please stop blowing bubbles for a moment?" ... then go into the growly bear act if she persisted. Respect goes both ways.

Good point. We don't know what transpired before the video. That same officer may very well have asked her very kindly and politely to blow bubbles elsewhere or put the bottle away. If that's the case and she continued, or even chose to approach further, then she was disobeying a lawful command, in which case the tougher tone of voice in the video would have been a respectful way of giving her one last chance while making it clear to her what the consequences will be if she continues. For all we know, she pulled the bottle out a third time, which might have led to the arrest. If that's the case, then the officer in question would have given her plenty of chances and clear warnings.

Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

And he over reacted - They ( All Offiers, Soldiers,Security Staff etc)were all briefed about being videod etc and not to be sucked into something that makes the Police come of as asses - To be watchful for these types of encounters -He blew it - Literally - No pun intended.

Did he feel the female Police Officer was not able to handle bubbles -

To be fair to the officers, some people are more defensive of others than they are of themselves. For example, had the girl been blowing bubbles at him, he might have tolerated it more but seeing her disrespecting his colleague and possibly friend like that made him feel the need to stand up for her, not because she was an officer or a woman, but a friend being disrespected in his presence.

If that's the case, while we can debate whether he'd overreacted in principle, he certainly did not overreact in the eyes of the law. Did he go too far? Maybe. Did the bubble-blower go too far? Absolutely. More responsibility falls on her shoulders for this seeing that she started it.

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Did any of you notice the cop and the girl made a "contract" in which she screwed herself?

Part of the video is cut outbetween that 'contract' and the arrest. If she did later take out the bottle and blow bubbles at him again, then she was really asking for it.
 
AnnaG
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

C'mon...she was blowing bubbles right in their face. Surely they are not harmful but her intent was obviously to antagonize and start trouble. I did not see them beating her.

That cop sounds just like people from Minnesota.

It didn't look to me like she was blowing bubbles in their faces. Looked to me like she was blowing them downward and between them.

Perhaps those poor TO cops might need a course in bubble defense.

We better email our MPs and let them know we want a new law: "Breach of wimpy cop security by threat of bubble".
 
Machjo
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaGView Post

It didn't look to me like she was blowing bubbles in their faces. Looked to me like she was blowing them downward and between them.

Perhaps those poor TO cops might need a course in bubble defense.

There is still the basic principle of respect for personal space which she was violating. Again, arresting her might have been an overreaction on the part of the police officers, and the male officer may have been a little too aggressive, confrontational and insulting in his demeanor, but still the bubble-blower was being provocative and disrespectful herself, so it is not fair to put 100% of the blame on the shoulders of the officer himself.
 
AnnaG
#26
Les wonders (after his laughing fit) what would happen if a firefighter sprayed down the cop with suppressant foam (a lot of bubbles). Would that be a hanging offense?

Come on. Blowing bubbles at someone is hardly cause for the reaction by that male officer. Even the girl cop was smiling for Pete's sake. Face it, the guy could have simply asked her to stop in a pleasant manner rather than treating the issue as a threat on his life.
 
Ron in Regina
#27
This Goat-Rodeo should never have taken place in a major city. This is just
plain ugly all around, and should have not been staged in Toronto or any other
place exposed to the public.

The huge chips on the shoulders of both sides of this situation are plainly
visible. I've said from day 1 that this should have taken place on a base like
CFB Cold Lake or someplace similar.

The people with children in that crowd are just plain insane. The fact that people
can not be out on the streets in their own home town during the day without me
thinking they're insane....is pretty crazy in itself. With their children, I mean.
 
AnnaG
#28
What is the velocity of one of these deadly missiles? The speed of a drunken snail? They aren't exactly tough to dodge.
 
Machjo
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

This Goat-Rodeo should never have taken place in a major city. This is just
plain ugly all around, and should have not been staged in Toronto or any other
place exposed to the public.

The huge chips on the shoulders of both sides of this situation are plainly
visible. I've said from day 1 that this should have taken place on a base like
CFB Cold Lake or someplace similar.

The people with children in that crowd are just plain insane. The fact that people
can not be out on the streets in their own home town during the day without me
thinking they're insane....is pretty crazy in itself. With their children, I mean.

Politicians. What more did you expect.
 
AnnaG
#30
hehe I just emailed TO city council and asked that a new law be implemented: "Breach of the security of wimpy cop by threat of bubble".
 

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