Young woman killed by coyotes


AnnaG
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

In a sense I guess, but what people, especially the tree huggers forget is that, like it or not, humans are also part of nature.

Not in a sense, Bob. We can all be genetically traced back to prehistoric single cell animals. Scientifically we are animals in every sense.
 
karrie
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

East or west, Karrie???

I am beginning to get the idea that eastern coyotes are more accurately called "brush wolves"......more aggressive, larger, more pack orientated than their western cousins.....

yes Colpy, it is west. But, I'm sure eastern coyotes have the same capacity to recognize risk. Of all the animals out there, coyotes seem to benefit the most from a bit of hunting and fear.
 
#juan
#33
If I saw this animal in the wild I would have identified it as a wolf:

Eastern Coyote Photo
 
AnnaG
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

No it is not at all arrogant.

Even if we set aside all the metaphysical considerations (as I know they are not part of your philosophy)........there remains the fact that humans are my species, that naturally makes them more important to me than any other.....that simple.

Yup. Dead right, Colpy. However, that is the subjective viewpoint and in the objective sense of the total amount of life on the planet, we are one small bit. We've been able to figure out about 2 million other species of life on Earth. Each one is as important to the health of the planet as any other species. Killing them off would result in the craftiest, most adaptable, and strongest surviving but only up to where the last species starves. We'll probably run out of fresh potable water long before that, though. Guess what the most adaptable critters are? Bugs. Bacteria, virii, etc.
 
AnnaG
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

If I saw this animal in the wild I would have identified it as a wolf:

Eastern Coyote Photo

Not me. Here's a wolf. There are differences.


Coyote
 
karrie
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

If I saw this animal in the wild I would have identified it as a wolf:

Eastern Coyote Photo

It looks like most coyotes I've seen.
 
#juan
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaGView Post

Not me. Here's a wolf. There are differences.


Coyote

That coyote doesn't look like any coyote I ever saw, and I've seen plenty. The following link is to a photo of a coyote that looks like a coyote:

http://advocacy.britannica.com/blog/...ote006-004.jpg
 
bobnoorduyn
#38
Coyotes in Nova Scotia

As coyotes spread eastward across North America they mixed with the red or eastern wolf, says wildlife biologist Jon Way. That created a cross that he calls a coywolf. DNA studies show that all the animals in the eastern part of Canada and the United States have wolf as part of their genetic makeup. The animals here are about five kilograms heavier on average than the coyote of the western part of the continent, weighing 16 kilograms with males sometimes reaching 25 kilograms

Fast Facts

- First recorded in Nova Scotia in 1977
- Top Speed of 55 km/h, and can bound five metres
- Main prey is snowshoe hares and white-tailed deer, either alive or dead. They also eat insects, blueberries, apples, mice, porcupines, woodchucks and garbage.
Source: Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources
 
bobnoorduyn
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaGView Post

Not in a sense, Bob. We can all be genetically traced back to prehistoric single cell animals. Scientifically we are animals in every sense.

I would tend to agree with part of that, but it would upset the PETA types if we had the same right to hunt, eat, and defend ourselves as the other animals. As far as the science, there's still the age old question; if we descended from the apes, why are there still apes?
 
#juan
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

Coyotes in Nova Scotia

As coyotes spread eastward across North America they mixed with the red or eastern wolf, says wildlife biologist Jon Way. That created a cross that he calls a coywolf. DNA studies show that all the animals in the eastern part of Canada and the United States have wolf as part of their genetic makeup. The animals here are about five kilograms heavier on average than the coyote of the western part of the continent, weighing 16 kilograms with males sometimes reaching 25 kilograms

Fast Facts

- First recorded in Nova Scotia in 1977
- Top Speed of 55 km/h, and can bound five metres
- Main prey is snowshoe hares and white-tailed deer, either alive or dead. They also eat insects, blueberries, apples, mice, porcupines, woodchucks and garbage.
Source: Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources

In 1965 I worked on the first tar sands plant in Fort McMurray. The job superintendent was driving to work just before Christmas and he hit a wolf with his truck. He went to the back of his truck thinking he would get a shovel handle to finish the animal off. He took one look at the wolf and went home to get his rifle. He later brought the dead animal to the job site. That wolf was literally skin and bone but it weighed over a hundred and fifty pounds. In good shape and well fed, it would have been well over two hundred pounds. I don't know what the record is but that wolf must have been close.
 
petros
#41
Quote:

I shoot coyotes because of their numbers, and because I think all large predators need to understand that man is off-limits. It is no coincidence that this attack happened in a Park, where the carnivores are perfectly safe from my rifle......

Thanks to coyotes I save big on losses from deer, mice and other rodents on the farm somewhere around 1/2 a tonne worth of food per section per farm. That's a ****load of food they help put on the tables of the world. If feeding the world isn't your schtick then think of it as 500 cases of beer per square mile
 
AnnaG
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

That coyote doesn't look like any coyote I ever saw, and I've seen plenty. The following link is to a photo of a coyote that looks like a coyote:

http://advocacy.britannica.com/blog/...ote006-004.jpg

Snout is pointier, ears are farther apart relative to head size, it's slimmer, less chest, coloring is quite different, and that's off the top of my head.
 
petros
#43
This started as a wolf.....

 
AnnaG
#44
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

I would tend to agree with part of that, but it would upset the PETA types if we had the same right to hunt, eat, and defend ourselves as the other animals. As far as the science, there's still the age old question; if we descended from the apes, why are there still apes?

We didn't descend from apes. We are a separate branch of the tree than apes. There were different human lines much like there are different ape lines, but we're not the same. Evolution isn't linear.
 
AnnaG
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

In 1965 I worked on the first tar sands plant in Fort McMurray. The job superintendent was driving to work just before Christmas and he hit a wolf with his truck. He went to the back of his truck thinking he would get a shovel handle to finish the animal off. He took one look at the wolf and went home to get his rifle. He later brought the dead animal to the job site. That wolf was literally skin and bone but it weighed over a hundred and fifty pounds. In good shape and well fed, it would have been well over two hundred pounds. I don't know what the record is but that wolf must have been close.

Yup. Wolves can be as much as a meter tall and 2 meters in length. On average I think a male weighs about 80 kg.
 
AnnaG
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Thanks to coyotes I save big on losses from deer, mice and other rodents on the farm somewhere around 1/2 a tonne worth of food per section per farm. That's a ****load of food they help put on the tables of the world. If feeding the world isn't your schtick then think of it as 500 cases of beer per square mile

Yup. Between the coyotes, great horned owls, hawks, golden eagles, martens, weasels, etc. the rodents have a full time job staying alive here, too. lol
 
Cliffy
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

As far as the science, there's still the age old question; if we descended from the apes, why are there still apes?

That is just plain silly. There are a variety of apes but only one species of human. Besides, humans were genetically engineered from one species of apes by aliens adding their DNA into the mix. The species of ape could still be here. If you don't believe me, look at Genesis. Aliens (angels) mated with the daughters of man. Or you can read Zackariah Sichen's The Twelfth Planet. He refers to Babylonian, Assyrian and Sumerian texts as well as biblical.
 
bobnoorduyn
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaGView Post

We didn't descend from apes. We are a separate branch of the tree than apes. There were different human lines much like there are different ape lines, but we're not the same. Evolution isn't linear.

I'm glad you agree with me on the "apes" thing, but there are scientists who don't and are still trying, unsucessfully, to prove otherwise. There is no concrete proof of where we came from, or that evolution, as popularly understood, exists or the eggheads trying to figure it out would have come to some agreement by now. As a local marine biologist once said, "you know what a lobster evolved from? A lobster".
 
AnnaG
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

I'm glad you agree with me on the "apes" thing, but there are scientists who don't and are still trying, unsucessfully, to prove otherwise. There is no concrete proof of where we came from, or that evolution, as popularly understood, exists or the eggheads trying to figure it out would have come to some agreement by now. As a local marine biologist once said, "you know what a lobster evolved from? A lobster".

Bob, a while ago I remember reading where researchers found the genetic mutation that separated man from ape. So those scientists trying to prove we are the same branch on the tree are doomed to fail.
I suppose I should quit using the tree analogy as evolution didn't happen treelike as Darwin thought it did.
 
bobnoorduyn
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

That is just plain silly. There are a variety of apes but only one species of human. Besides, humans were genetically engineered from one species of apes by aliens adding their DNA into the mix. The species of ape could still be here. If you don't believe me, look at Genesis. Aliens (angels) mated with the daughters of man. Or you can read Zackariah Sichen's The Twelfth Planet. He refers to Babylonian, Assyrian and Sumerian texts as well as biblical.

I was using the ape analogy facetiously, and the term ape is somewhat generic to describe a number of primate species. But technically, if we were genetically engineered we couldn't really be called descendants of, or evlolved from something else. You can mix breeds of dogs and get a mixed breed dog, but it's still a dog, and only because it has been domesticated. They still breed with wolves and make for particularly nasty offspring. They haven't yet found a way to mix humans with other primates, yet.
 
petros
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduynView Post

I'm glad you agree with me on the "apes" thing, but there are scientists who don't and are still trying, unsucessfully, to prove otherwise. There is no concrete proof of where we came from, or that evolution, as popularly understood, exists or the eggheads trying to figure it out would have come to some agreement by now. As a local marine biologist once said, "you know what a lobster evolved from? A lobster".

Does your blood have an Rh factor tieing you to the Rhesus monkey? Do you have the identical male pattern balding gene as the chimp?

Well then you might be a redneck...

As for the lobster....

Quote:


For more than a century, scientists have debated the family tree of the arthropods, the largest and most diverse division of the animal kingdom. Now, scientists have found genetic evidence that all arthropods--from the lowly millipede to the lobster--have a common ancestor. The discovery of a common genetic circuit for limb formation in arthropods not only is important for developmental biology, but also holds promise as an important new window to the past.
"This is a new way of looking at evolution. For arthropods, the fossil record has a lot of missing links," notes University of Wisconsin-Madison molecular biologist Grace Panganiban. "The record is not clear about what evolved into what. Here, at the molecular level, we can see the tracks of evolution."
Panganiban and her colleagues have discovered a common set of genes that govern limb formation among arthropods, a broad division of the animal kingdom that includes insects, crustaceans, spiders, centipedes, and millipedes. That finding, she indicates, constitutes new evidence that arthropods--which include tens of thousands of distinct species--arose millions of years ago from a single common ancestor.
The newly discovered genes essentially are the same in all arthropods. However, each species uses those genes in different ways to build its own unique body structure.
According to Panganiban, the genes that guide an animal's development can be re-engaged in evolution to build on...

Quote has been trimmed
As for us types who purchase gear from or work for EG&G, we thank you dearly for you fear of ghosts to finance the wonderful gifts technology brings.
 
#juan
#52
It is my understanding that all living things share parts of the same DNA. Meaning, that we are related to every other living thing, including apes.
 
Risus
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Ah, Dear Lord, is there anything more intellectually arrogant than a lefty Toronto resident???

Yep.....sometimes I kill for the sheer hell of it, because I please. For fun. Because I can. So what????

Only within the law, only animals that are pests, and PETA can kiss my furry ****.

No, I have never mowed down a human.....in fact, I realized how horrible it would be to have to shoot someone the first time I killed a deer. I'm not confused about the morality of life and death in nature.....you are. I have an active enough brain stem to be able to differentiate between humans and animals....my guess is that you do not.

I used to think you had a brain. Not now. You are a despicable individual.

I bet you still kill deer. You are the confused individual Killing for the fun of it actually shows that you are the one confused with the morality of Life and Death.

Just so you know. I am an outdoorsman, grew up in NB. I am not an arrogant lefty from Toronto. Just happen to reside there temporarily.

I have an excellent idea for what someone can do to your furry ****, you arrogant despicable individual.
 
Colpy
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by RisusView Post

I used to think you had a brain. Not now. You are a despicable individual.

I bet you still kill deer. You are the confused individual Killing for the fun of it actually shows that you are the one confused with the morality of Life and Death.

Just so you know. I am an outdoorsman, grew up in NB. I am not an arrogant lefty from Toronto. Just happen to reside there temporarily.

I have an excellent idea for what someone can do to your furry ****, you arrogant despicable individual.

What is your problem?

Hundreds of thousands, if not millions of Canadians hunt every year, and they do it for the sport of it...(read fun). The vast vast majority of hunters do NOT do so because they need to fill the larder, believe me....it is an expensive sport, and ground beef ain't nearly that pricey.

Yes, I shoot coyotes. If a few more people shot coyotes a promising young folk singer would still be alive today. Nature is wild, and dangerous, and fear of man in large predators, or pack carnivores, is a instinct that badly needs to be encouraged.

How about addressing the argument and not sliding off into some emotional and incoherently insulting rant???
 
Risus
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

What is your problem?

Hundreds of thousands, if not millions of Canadians hunt every year, and they do it for the sport of it...(read fun). The vast vast majority of hunters do NOT do so because they need to fill the larder, believe me....it is an expensive sport, and ground beef ain't nearly that pricey.

Yes, I shoot coyotes. If a few more people shot coyotes a promising young folk singer would still be alive today. Nature is wild, and dangerous, and fear of man in large predators, or pack carnivores, is a instinct that badly needs to be encouraged.

How about addressing the argument and not sliding off into some emotional and incoherently insulting rant???

You need to respect nature, and the danger thereof, not try to destroy it.
And I am not referring to hunting if you are going to eat the animal. I am referring to killing just for the sake of killing.
 
Cliffy
#56
Quote: Originally Posted by RisusView Post

You need to respect nature, and the danger thereof, not try to destroy it.
And I am not referring to hunting if you are going to eat the animal. I am referring to killing just for the sake of killing.

Yes, I think those that enjoy killing for sport should be sent overseas to fight in a war, any war. It would be much more sporting if your target is shooting back at you.
 
bobnoorduyn
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

It is my understanding that all living things share parts of the same DNA. Meaning, that we are related to every other living thing, including apes.

Uhhh, yeah, but we're casting a pretty wide net now, kind of like saying we are related to every other carbon based life form because we are carbon based life forms.
 
bobnoorduyn
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Does your blood have an Rh factor tieing you to the Rhesus monkey? Do you have the identical male pattern balding gene as the chimp?

Well then you might be a redneck...

I haven't seen too many Rhesus monkeys or chimps driving 4X4's with light bars and big tires in the city, (just some folks who look like them), so I don't see the connection. However, I wouldn't mind the balding pattern that affects a certain part of the baboon's anatomy. I still can't figure out why, as we get older, we need more hair there than on our heads.
 
earth_as_one
#59
Sounds like the family does not want people killing coyotes:

Letter from coyote victim's mother

A photo of Taylor Mitchell from her Facebook page.

Folk musician Taylor Mitchell 'was my shining light, my baby, my confidante and best friend,' mom says in grateful letter to public

Quote:

On behalf of my family, I want to express my deepest thanks for the outpouring of condolences and support from Taylor's friends and fans, near and far. My thanks to the hikers who called 911, the RCMP officer who first arrived on the scene and did his utmost to help her, as well as the incredible doctors and nurses at Queen Elizabeth II Hospital in Halifax who tried desperately to save her. I wish to also thank RCMP's Victims Services, and the Atlantica Hotel who've gone out of their way to support us during this difficult time.
There are no words to describe my grief. Taylor was my shining light, my baby, my confidante and best friend. My world is turned upside down and forever transformed without her. I don't know how to move forward from here but I know that she would want that for me and I will try to do that in her memory and celebrate her life in the way she lived it -- with passion, commitment and an unbridled loving heart.
I've noticed that the media have often mentioned that Taylor was hiking alone when the coyote attack occurred. I want people to know that Taylor was a seasoned naturalist and well versed in wilderness camping. She loved the woods and had a deep affinity for their beauty and serenity. Tragically it was her time to be taken from us so soon.
We take a calculated risk when spending time in nature's fold -- it's the wildlife's terrain. When the decision had been made to kill the pack of coyotes, I clearly heard Taylor's...

Quote has been trimmed
I don't have problems with people who hunt for sport as long as they obey the law. In the absense of predators, humans can be beneficial. I still fish, but I gave up hunting and trapping. Now I take photos:
Attached Images
wolf 002.jpg (54.1 KB, 7 views)
 
Wallace
#60
A hundred years ago no wild animal would have come near a human. They would have been shot on sight. They were afraid of humans and rightly so. The last fifty years has taught them that they've nothing to fear from us, so they're wandering into our territory bold as brass. It's only a short step from there to the animals deciding its THEIR territory once more and it is us who are to be chased out. We had bears in our cottage area in Southern Ontario for the first time in fifty years. And they weren't the slightest bit afraid. For the first time ever, I'm thinking of buying a gun.

The Toronto yuppies have been watching too much Disney.
 

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