14 Americans Killed as 3 Helicopters Downed Across Afghanistan


JBeee
#1
By Jason Ditz
October 26, 2009

Three US helicopters were downed across Afghanistan today, killing 14 Americans (external - login to view), including 11 soldiers and three embassy officials. DEA personnel were also reportedly among the slain (external - login to view), and were apparently included by officials in the “soldiers” toll.

The deadliest incident was in Badghis Province, in which Taliban reportedly shot down a helicopter, killing 10 Americans and also wounding 11 other US soldiers, a US civilian, and 14 Afghans (external - login to view).

The US denied that the Taliban has actually downed the helicopter, claiming the crash was due to “unconfirmed reasons (external - login to view)” but insisting that it had nothing to do with the Taliban.

The two other helicopters lost today were in the restive Helmand Province, and apparently collided with one another before crashing to the ground, leaving four US soldiers dead and two others wounded. The Taliban likewise claimed to have been firing on the helicopters when they collided.

Though it is impossible to ascertain what actually happened, the Taliban seems eager to take credit for all the downings and the US seems eager to insist all three were accidents. While it is clear the Taliban would gain credibility from being able to down three US military helicopters in one morning, it is unclear what the US gains from claiming the level of incompetence that would allow it to lose three helicopters and cause dozens of casualties through sheer happenstance.
 
coldstream
#2
This whole thing is looking more like the Russian experience in Afghanistan, preceeded by the British in the 19th Century. Technology has not solved the problem of governing a tribal culture that has no history of allegiance to a central government, just a communal agreement that they don't wan't foreigners, and infidels, to have any say in the attempt.

What's worse for the U.S., is that its looking increasingly like their experience in Viet Nam... where the objectives became increasingly vague and remote from the original intent (the Cold War then, the War of Terror now).

Like Viet Nam they ended up supporting a jaded and corrupt political clique, which controlled the capital city and little beyond. Like Viet Nam they spouted high ideals that fell apart in the coduct of a brutal guerilla war at the village level.

And like Viet Nam the electorate simply got exhausted with the steady drumbeat of casualties with no end in sight, and no clear annunciation, beyond canned slogans, of what these soldiers were dying for, and when things were going to get better.

RIP to those killed.
Last edited by coldstream; Oct 26th, 2009 at 01:23 PM..
 
#juan
#3
On the other hand, the Chinook is a bloody big target for a Stinger or similar weapon.
 
Risus
#4
I guess yankee pilots need retraining... Maybe they fell asleep...
 
Niflmir
#5
A colleague of mine was pointing out how lucky it was that Uzbekistan is ruled by a dictator--my friend is from Uzbekistan--because if an election were ever held, the taliban would win 99-1.

Strange perspective.
 
Goober
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by JBeeeView Post

By Jason Ditz
October 26, 2009
Three US helicopters were downed across Afghanistan today, killing 14 Americans, including 11 soldiers and three embassy officials. DEA personnel were also reportedly among the slain, and were apparently included by officials in the “soldiers” toll.
The deadliest incident was in Badghis Province, in which Taliban reportedly shot down a helicopter, killing 10 Americans and also wounding 11 other US soldiers, a US civilian, and 14 Afghans.
The US denied that the Taliban has actually downed the helicopter, claiming the crash was due to “unconfirmed reasons” but insisting that it had...

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post

Jbeee - I am starting to get the opinion that when you hear of US, Canadian and other NATO troops dying it gives you immense satisfaction - Yes - No - Maybee???
 
JBeee
#7
Read it and weep, bubs.

Kabul, Afghanistan (CNN) -- The U.S. military suffered another day of heavy losses in Afghanistan on Tuesday as roadside bombs killed eight soldiers, two military officials told CNN.

An Afghan civilian working with NATO troops also was killed in the attacks in southern Afghanistan, the military said. The officials said that, according to initial reports, one blast took place just outside Kandahar and the other was in neighboring Zabul province.

Seven of the soldiers who died were traveling together in one vehicle, said Sgt. Jerome Baysmore with the International Security Assistance Force Joint Command.

The military gave no further details about the bombings, which it said also wounded several other service members. The official said one service member was killed in one attack, while the other seven were killed in the other attack.

The U.S. military described the bombings as "multiple complex IED attacks," which means they were followed by small arms fire, the official said. That has been the typical Taliban operational method for attacking U.S. forces in recent months, the official said.

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs issued a statement of condolence: "As always our prayers go out to those who have lost a loved one and for those who sacrificed so much to serve our country."

The attacks happened a day after 14 Americans were killed in a pair of helicopter crashes in Afghanistan. The 14 deaths were the largest number of Americans killed in Afghanistan in a single day in more than four years.

With the deaths of two troops on Sunday, a total of 24 Americans -- most of them military -- have been killed in a 48-hour period. That makes October 2009, with 58 fatalities, the deadliest month for the U.S. military since the Afghanistan war (external - login to view) began in October 2001.

Enemy action was not thought to be the cause of either of Monday's helicopter crashes. Three Drug Enforcement Administration special agents and seven U.S. troops (external - login to view) were killed in one crash in western Afghanistan as they returned from a raid on a compound believed to be harboring insurgents tied to drug trafficking.

The other crash, in which two helicopters collided over southern Afghanistan, killed four Marines.

But it is roadside bombs -- commonly referred to as IEDs, short for improvised explosive devices -- that have caused the majority of U.S. fatalities in Afghanistan in recent months. Last month, Defense Secretary Robert Gates approved a deployment of up to 3,000 U.S. troops to Afghanistan to deal with the growing threat from roadside bombs.

Such attacks have been on a steady rise since February, and account for 70 percent of U.S. casualties in Afghanistan this year, according to U.S. military statistics.

Compared with just two years ago, the number of American troops killed by roadside bombs is up 400 percent.

"That's the number one threat," Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in July about IEDs in Afghanistan. Eighty-two deadly attacks occurred in June -- almost double the number from May -- and 105 in July, according to the latest U.S. military statistics.

Maj. Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. troops in eastern Afghanistan, said he has noticed an "increasing sophistication" in the types of IEDs used.

"We're seeing some of the tactics, techniques and procedures that were used in Iraq, and [were] common there, migrate, obviously, here," Scaparrotti said in a recent briefing on operations in his area of command.


Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

Jbeee - I am starting to get the opinion that when you hear of US, Canadian and other NATO troops dying it gives you immense satisfaction - Yes - No - Maybee???

 
Goober
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by JBeeeView Post

Read it and weep, bubs.

Kabul, Afghanistan (CNN) -- The U.S. military suffered another day of heavy losses in Afghanistan on Tuesday as roadside bombs killed eight soldiers, two military officials told CNN.

An Afghan civilian working with NATO troops also was killed in the attacks in southern Afghanistan, the military said. The officials said that, according to initial reports, one blast took place just outside Kandahar and the other was in neighboring Zabul province.

Seven of the soldiers who died were traveling together in one vehicle, said Sgt. Jerome Baysmore with the International Security Assistance Force Joint Command.

The military gave no further details about the bombings, which it said also wounded several other service members. The official said one service member was killed in one attack, while the other seven were killed in the other attack.

The U.S. military described the bombings as "multiple complex IED attacks," which means they were followed by small arms fire, the official said. That has been the typical Taliban operational method for attacking U.S. forces in recent months, the official said.

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs issued a statement of condolence: "As always our prayers go out to those who have lost a loved one and for those who sacrificed so much to serve our country."

The attacks happened a day after 14 Americans were killed in a pair of helicopter crashes in Afghanistan. The 14 deaths were the largest number of Americans killed in Afghanistan in a single day in more than four years.

With the deaths of two troops on Sunday, a total of 24 Americans -- most of them military -- have been killed in a 48-hour period. That makes October 2009, with 58 fatalities, the deadliest month for the U.S. military since the Afghanistan war (external - login to view) began in October 2001.

Enemy action was not thought to be the cause of either of Monday's helicopter crashes. Three Drug Enforcement Administration special agents and seven U.S. troops (external - login to view) were killed in one crash in western Afghanistan as they returned from a raid on a compound believed to be harboring insurgents tied to drug trafficking.

The other crash, in which two helicopters collided over southern Afghanistan, killed four Marines.

But it is roadside bombs -- commonly referred to as IEDs, short for improvised explosive devices -- that have caused the majority of U.S. fatalities in Afghanistan in recent months. Last month, Defense Secretary Robert Gates approved a deployment of up to 3,000 U.S. troops to Afghanistan to deal with the growing threat from roadside bombs.

Such attacks have been on a steady rise since February, and account for 70 percent of U.S. casualties in Afghanistan this year, according to U.S. military statistics.

Compared with just two years ago, the number of American troops killed by roadside bombs is up 400 percent.

"That's the number one threat," Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in July about IEDs in Afghanistan. Eighty-two deadly attacks occurred in June -- almost double the number from May -- and 105 in July, according to the latest U.S. military statistics.

Maj. Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. troops in eastern Afghanistan, said he has noticed an "increasing sophistication" in the types of IEDs used.

"We're seeing some of the tactics, techniques and procedures that were used in Iraq, and [were] common there, migrate, obviously, here," Scaparrotti said in a recent briefing on operations in his area of command.

Just remember the hate you have will come back to bite in one way or another - It always does -
 
JBeee
#9
..on both sides, no doubt.

If I gave a **** buddy, I`d care,,,,,but I don`t.

Read it an weep.

Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

Just remember the hate you have will come back to bite in one way or another - It always does -

 
Goober
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by JBeeeView Post

..on both sides, no doubt.

If I gave a **** buddy, I`d care,,,,,but I don`t.

Read it an weep.

Seems you are fixated on Soldiers dying - Must give you a chubb - as you are such a little prxck - small chubb is better than no Chubb I gues. Sad.
 
JBeee
#11
Ever since watching G. W. and C. Rice *** in unison, as the twin towers fell (in unison), I`ve been addicted to what the right has to offer.


Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

Seems you are fixated on Soldiers dying - Must give you a chubb - as you are such a little prxck - small chubb is better than no Chubb I gues. Sad.

 
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