Canadians' wide spread ignorance of canada


VanIsle
#1
There's not much national pride to be drawn from a new poll published just in time for Canada Day. The Canadian Press Harris-Decima survey suggests the country knows little about its own history - even its most recent history.
Only 42 per cent of respondents knew Canada had three territories - which, when compared with some of the other results from the 13-question survey, could be ranked as a towering success.
When asked how old Canada was turning this year, just 21 per cent answered correctly that the country - founded in 1867 - was turning 142 years old.
The wild range of incorrect replies spanned from 30 years to 287 years, placing Canada's founding at sometime between the War of Spanish Succession and the dying days of disco.
"You've got a big range of perception about how old Canada is," said Harris-Decima vice-president Jeff Walker.
Seems like we are always seeing news like this about Americans. Now it's our turn for the truth.
 
petros
#2
Few know that Tecumseh was one of the founders of the country and one of it's biggest unsung hero.
 
earth_as_one
#3
I'm not surprised. I've observed more Canadians know about George Washington than Sir John A. MacDonald.

We live in a big country. There's a lot to know. I can say I've been from coast to coast to coast. I've even swam in the Arctic ocean (briefly several times).

I've been as far north as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

As far west as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

As far south as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

And as far east as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

I've also been pretty close to the center of Canada:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

Yet I've only seen a small fraction of Canada. I still haven't been to New Brunswick, PEI, the Yukon or the NWT.
 
L Gilbert
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Few know that Tecumseh was one of the founders of the country and one of it's biggest unsung hero.

Made a pretty good small engine, too, cept for a low tolerance for missed maintenance procedures and carb problems.
 
L Gilbert
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_oneView Post

I'm not surprised. I've observed more Canadians know about George Washington than Sir John A. MacDonald.

We live in a big country. There's a lot to know. I can say I've been from coast to coast to coast. I've even swam in the Arctic ocean (briefly several times).

I've been as far north as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

As far west as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

As far south as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

And as far east as here:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

I've also been pretty close to the center of Canada:
Google Maps (external - login to view)

Yet I've only seen a small fraction of Canada. I still haven't been to New Brunswick, PEI, the Yukon or the NWT.

Been as far east as Teranna, and as far west as Aklavik (NWT).
 
aman12
#6
I've lived in all 10provinces and 3 territories.Its an incredible country and many Canadians know so little about it. I've had Grade 10 students who did not know the name of the lake our town borders on.(Great Slave Lake).
 
Cliffy
#7
Is Canada only 142 years old or is more like 10 thousand? Is Canada a place (geography) or history? Does history only begin on July 1st 1867? If it is history, then it is a biased story. History rarely reflects the truth.
 
petros
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Made a pretty good small engine, too, cept for a low tolerance for missed maintenance procedures and carb problems.

Tillotson carb probably. They are great if the diaphragms don't dry up.
 
petros
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Is Canada only 142 years old or is more like 10 thousand? Is Canada a place (geography) or history? Does history only begin on July 1st 1867? If it is history, then it is a biased story. History rarely reflects the truth.

It was Atlantis before the massive lake on the ice sheet let go and wiped it clean (water above firmament).
 
Cliffy
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

It was Atlantis before the massive lake on the ice sheet let go and wiped it clean (water above firmament).

"your own personal Jesus"

Does that refer to you or that we are all our own personal Jesus?
 
L Gilbert
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Tillotson carb probably. They are great if the diaphragms don't dry up.

Yep. And small engines are prone to be seasonal. Which means they sit dry for long periods.
 
L Gilbert
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Is Canada only 142 years old or is more like 10 thousand? Is Canada a place (geography) or history? Does history only begin on July 1st 1867? If it is history, then it is a biased story. History rarely reflects the truth.

10,000? People have wandered around here for at least 18,000.
 
L Gilbert
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

"your own personal Jesus"

Does that refer to you or that we are all our own personal Jesus?

huh?
 
Cliffy
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

huh?

Look at the quote at the bottom of petros' posts.
 
Cliffy
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

10,000? People have wandered around here for at least 18,000.

It is generally accepted that the last Ice Age receded 10 thousand years ago, but there were some small areas of Canada that were not covered. In the Kootenays, the ice sheet went into the states, so any older occupation would have been pre- Ice Age. That, I am sure, did happen, although I might get some flack from archaeologists for saying that. It can't be proved, at least in our neck of the woods. The oldest known find is 9000 years old on the Arrow Lakes at Deer Park.
 
Unforgiven
#16
What passes for history class in this country is the reason. I suppose that if some teacher put on some easy listening music it would be just a little more boring but not much.

Maybe too much focus is put on dates and places which are static and do nothing while all the action of people and the context which makes them interesting people living in interesting times is wonky.

Sadly it's usually the boring teachers who get to read history facts and figures from a book to uninterested and disassociated students.

Of course when a teacher does come along that can teach the rich fabric of history in Canada, they are quickly shunted to some other job, probably in administration. I suspect so as not to show up the boring teachers putting in time til they can retire from their crappy 8-4:30 job of babysitting brats.
 
Cliffy
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by UnforgivenView Post

What passes for history class in this country is the reason. I suppose that if some teacher put on some easy listening music it would be just a little more boring but not much.

Maybe too much focus is put on dates and places which are static and do nothing while all the action of people and the context which makes them interesting people living in interesting times is wonky.

Sadly it's usually the boring teachers who get to read history facts and figures from a book to uninterested and disassociated students.

Of course when a teacher does come along that can teach the rich fabric of history in Canada, they are quickly shunted to some other job, probably in administration. I suspect so as not to show up the boring teachers putting in time til they can retire from their crappy 8-4:30 job of babysitting brats.

Yes! You nailed that one. Most students only retain enough info to get through a boring exam then promptly forget it.

I once researched the history of the Cariboo Gold Rush for almost six months and ended up with about 10 pages of interesting information. I produced a small booklet 36 pages long with a cartoon on one page and a bit of info on the next. Most history is really dry.
 
#juan
#18
I took the 13 question quiz and I got 9 questions right. I didn't do as well as I thought I would but certainly better than most of those on the survey.
 
EagleSmack
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

"your own personal Jesus"

Does that refer to you or that we are all our own personal Jesus?

Thats a song from a good ol' band from the US of A! Depeche Mode...from Boston!


YouTube - Depeche Mode- Personal jesus Official Video




Petros knows where to get his music!
 
Trex
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

It is generally accepted that the last Ice Age receded 10 thousand years ago, but there were some small areas of Canada that were not covered. In the Kootenays, the ice sheet went into the states, so any older occupation would have been pre- Ice Age. That, I am sure, did happen, although I might get some flack from archaeologists for saying that. It can't be proved, at least in our neck of the woods. The oldest known find is 9000 years old on the Arrow Lakes at Deer Park.

There were several regions where there was no glaciation.
It is assumed a land bridge used to connect Alaska and Russia.
It is believed that an un-glaciated strip of land connected from the far north to south of the glaciers reach through what is now Alberta.
The coasts were probably un-glaciated as well.
Then there is the whole issue of glaciers pushing paleo man south out of the glaciated zone.
Paleo points (Clovis and Folsom)are commonly assumed to be around 10 or 11,000 years old.
Digs in several locations in the USA, Central and South America are now dating back from 15,000 to 18,000 years.
Its a fluid subject with lots of debate and new information coming forth.

Trex
 
captain morgan
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Thats a song from a good ol' band from the US of A! Depeche Mode...from Boston!

You forget that Johnny Cash sang that long before Depeche Mode.
 
EagleSmack
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

You forget that Johnny Cash sang that long before Depeche Mode.

Au contraire. Johnny Cash covered the song long after Depeche Mode wrote and released it.
 
Cliffy
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by TrexView Post

There were several regions where there was no glaciation.
It is assumed a land bridge used to connect Alaska and Russia.
It is believed that an un-glaciated strip of land connected from the far north to south of the glaciers reach through what is now Alberta.
The coasts were probably un-glaciated as well.
Then there is the whole issue of glaciers pushing paleo man south out of the glaciated zone.
Paleo points (Clovis and Folsom)are commonly assumed to be around 10 or 11,000 years old.
Digs in several locations in the USA, Central and South America are now dating back from 15,000 to 18,000 years.
Its a fluid subject with lots of debate and new information coming forth.

Trex

In order for there to be a land bridge at the Bering Straight the water level had to drop 400 feet. This would have opened the coast to easy access by foot or small island hopping boats. The ice free corridor in Alberta would have been a much more difficult route and really doesn't make sense. If the water lever dropped that much it would also open a route from Europe. DNA test of eastern aboriginal populations indicates European origins.

Findings in central and south America indicate Hawaiian and Aborigine (Australia) origins. The southern tip of Argentina suggest African. The standard story of the Bering Land bridge is falling apart. The site in Siberia where they formerly thought the Clovis point originate have been found to be younger than those in the US, so migration may have been two way street.
 
Cliffy
#24
Where I live, they used a Sturgeon Nosed canoe. It is unique in North America/. The only other place on the planet where a Sturgeon nosed canoe can be found is in northern Tibet.
 
taxslave
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Few know that Tecumseh was one of the founders of the country and one of it's biggest unsung hero.

About the worst engines ever built. Next to everything that came out of England.
 
taxslave
#26
MacLeans magazine had a Canada quiz last week. I got 3 out of twenty. Not bad considering many of the questions were sports related and they said it was a tough quiz. About five years ago when my wife became a Canadian citizen (comes from Germany)I read all the practice questions and they were not all that hard. she did better than me simply because she studied and wanted to ace the test. Most of the
Asian people there couldn't even read or speak enough english to do the test but passed anyway. Kind of pissed her off.
 
Trex
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

In order for there to be a land bridge at the Bering Straight the water level had to drop 400 feet. This would have opened the coast to easy access by foot or small island hopping boats. The ice free corridor in Alberta would have been a much more difficult route and really doesn't make sense. If the water lever dropped that much it would also open a route from Europe. DNA test of eastern aboriginal populations indicates European origins.

Findings in central and south America indicate Hawaiian and Aborigine (Australia) origins. The southern tip of Argentina suggest African. The standard story of the Bering Land bridge is falling apart. The site in Siberia where they formerly thought the Clovis point originate have been found to be younger than those in the US, so migration may have been two way street.

I disagree with pretty much everything you say, but hey that's what makes the world go around.
I have a few geological courses under my belt. Grew up knowing a few archaeologists from my Dad's days teaching at Uni and have participated in several digs.
My own personal find flint collection of atl atl, arrow and spear points numbers pretty close to 200 pieces and yes they are both surface finds and legal.
And yes I have a couple of beautiful Paleo's.

The Bering land bridge is reasonably well accepted and although I have never seen hydrological soundings I am almost positive the water is far far shallower there than draining the North Atlantic to allow crossings from Northern Europe.
I had friends on the Yukon Bluefish dig and it still looks like a land bridge is viable.
Clovis points are named after Clovis, New Mexico where they were originally found.
You are indeed however correct in that several different waves and routes were probably taken and you are also correct that they could have gone back and forth.

Sea routes and coastal land routes as well as an ice free corridor are pretty well accepted.
The ice free corridor through Alberta again is pretty well established and would have been a perfectely viable route.
The question is more when and how many times did it open and close?
Many areas of Canada were never glaciated and in fact parts of Alberta never saw a glacier.
Cypress Hills is an excellent example of that.
DNA typing in the Americas shows Polynesian influences not Hawaiian and they of course were seafarers.

I am first generation from the UK and my ancestors were from Kent.
My own personal DNA analysis shows markers from the Sami people who exsisted in
the Scandanavian cultures as well as in Russia.
Obviously a viking or two in the old family woodpile.
Those same aboriginal markers also show up in various native aboriginal tribes in Canada and the United States.
I doubt it will qualify me for a treaty card anytime soon but it certainly does seem to indicate ancient travel from Russia to North America.

Meadowcroft and Cactus Hill sites in the States are well known and well dug.
Chronological testing is intense and is really nailing down the dating.
Its about 15 or 16,000 years old.

Monte Verde in SA is the same deal.
Its well known and well dug.
Very well tested also.
15 or 16,000 years old.

Trex
 
JLM
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsleView Post

There's not much national pride to be drawn from a new poll published just in time for Canada Day. The Canadian Press Harris-Decima survey suggests the country knows little about its own history - even its most recent history.
Only 42 per cent of respondents knew Canada had three territories - which, when compared with some of the other results from the 13-question survey, could be ranked as a towering success.
When asked how old Canada was turning this year, just 21 per cent answered correctly that the country - founded in 1867 - was turning 142 years old.
The wild range of incorrect replies spanned from 30 years to 287 years, placing Canada's founding at sometime between the War of Spanish Succession and the dying days of disco.
"You've got a big range of perception about how old Canada is," said Harris-Decima vice-president Jeff Walker.

Seems like we are always seeing news like this about Americans. Now it's our turn for the truth.

Not surprising VanIsle- look at the crap the younger generation is obsessed with- there would be neither the time nor the space in their heads to absorb much of the important stuff. How much of their time is taken up obsessing over things like piercings, tattoos, pot and Michael Jackson? That stuff has to be way more important than old John A....................
 
Machjo
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Is Canada only 142 years old or is more like 10 thousand? Is Canada a place (geography) or history? Does history only begin on July 1st 1867? If it is history, then it is a biased story. History rarely reflects the truth.

Canada as a political concept evolved over time through European imperialism does indeed officially begin on July 1st 1867. Turtle Island, of course, is much older.
 
Liberalman
#30
Benjamin Franklin was the first Postmaster of Upper Canada until he flew that dam kite in an electrical storm.

Someone told him that that was a revolutionary idea but because of his hearing he thought that he was supposed join the revolution.

 

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