Man dies after 34 hours in ER without getting treatment


Praxius
#1


http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...923?hub=Canada

Quote:

A Winnipeg man waited 34 hours in an emergency room this weekend, but died without getting treatment.

Sources tell CTV News he was homeless.

Last Friday at 3:00 p.m., the man walked into the emergency room at the Health Sciences Centre seeking treatment.

At 1:00 a.m. Sunday morning, staff found the man unconscious.

He was pronounced dead a short time later, after they tried to resuscitate him.

The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) won't release the man's name and they won't say what he came in for.

Unconfirmed reports also claim the man may have been dead for several hours before he was noticed by staff.

Those allegations will now be part of the review looking into the matter.

A critical incident review is underway involving the Health Sciences Centre, its emergency department, and the WRHA.

"It's a concern when something like that happens," WRHA spokesperson Heidi Graham told CTV News. "We want to review and find out, not pre-judge, what happened during those hours. But we are going to get to the bottom and find out what happened."

The WRHA wouldn't go any further, saying just that the review will identify what went wrong, and make recommendations of how things should be changed to prevent this from happening again.

But the Manitoba's Conservative health critic says there's no way it should have happened at all.

"I find this unbelievable. This is a horrible failure of our health care system," Myrna Driedger said. "We have been harping on the NDP government for many many years now, that we have a crisis in our ERs. We have been told numerous times by this government and by this premier that they are fixing it. This is not a fix of our health care system when a person dies in a waiting room."

Seriously, who the hell waits 34 hours in the ER to get treatment?

Oh yeah.... the unwanted homeless people aparently.

This is just fk'n sick. The ER's are absolute crap here in Nova Scotia, but I have never in all my life heard of someone waiting 34 hours for treatment.

I'm actually curious.... what is the average wait time in a Winnipeg Hospital for anybody here who lives there? How long did it take to see a doctor, from the time you entered the hospital?

An Hour?

Three to Four Hours like what I tend to wait here in Nova Scotia?

A day?

Two??

My grilfriend had to goto the ERl when she first came to Canada.... she waited 8 fk'n hours to get a simple perscription, while I usually wait 3-4 hours for something similar to what she had to get.

Is there a prejudice against people who are from another country and the homeless?
 
lone wolf
#2
It's not just homeless people. Late nights when the clinics are closed in a one ER town - as big as Sudbury - and a frightening number of people are paying the price for government stupidity (without a family doctor) it's not uncommon to be 10 hours waiting. Medical staff don't prod folks in chairs - and security is busy making sure everyone's paid their five bucks to the parking lot. Housekeeping may find the dead guy. When minutes count....
 
Tonington
#3
Well, for starters Praxius, an ER isn't intended to serve as a family doctor or GP, even though that's what happens most often. ER's rank the seriousness of the matter. So if there are people coming in with serious need to see a doctor, they're going to get in faster than someone who needs an Rx filled.

My wait times in NS ER's have been fairly short, because when I've been there it was for broken bones, ruptured ear drums and foreign objects piercing my body.

My GP fills my prescriptions.

But yah, 34 hours is out of the question, really ridiculous...I wonder what the man died from, and what he told the ER nurses at reception...time will tell I guess.
 
Unforgiven
#4
You know, an old lady told me the secret to getting some attention in the ER quickly.

Just start shrieking and shrieking at the top of your lungs. Even when they come to quiet you, shriek even more. Using this method, your ER wait time on average drops from 5 to 10 hours, down to about five fricken minutes. Care should be taken though as there is a possibility that the staff may try the old switcheroo where they send a doctor over, who tells you they will be right back. As soon as the Doctor leaves, resume shrieking at top volume.

This will ensure prompt medical attention and perhaps even a nice shot of Valium to soothe your nerves after all that howling. yummy.

And for those of you with a conscience, don't let it bother you. Those people in the waiting room are the same jerks that drive slow in the fast lane, stand in doorways and grocery isles, and yap away at the movie theater on their phone while you're trying to watch the movie you paid through the teeth to see. F uck em!
 
TenPenny
#5
If your girlfriend waited 8 hrs for a simple prescription at an ER, then I'd say that's about what it should be. ER isn't for prescriptions, it's for emergencies.

As for this case, I'd be interested to know the facts.
 
karrie
#6
In Grande Prairie showing up in the ER with a clinical complaint can see you waiting for upwards of 12 hours. It's called triage... if there are people with more pressing needs, then they get bumped ahead of you, and you wait and wait and wait. That's what an ER is.

Here, I've waited 2 hours to see a doc for my son's broken collar bone. It just wasn't as pressing as the other issues on their plate, even though we felt in a panic about it. His asthma attacks on the other hand, he's seen instantly. And when I carried him into an ER because he's fallen on his head, it was instant then too. Hubby putting a drill through his hand... in immediately. Getting knocked out at 8 months pregnant... in immediately. Car crash... in immediately.

Reading the article, I have to wonder how often the ER there has homeless people come in with a complaint in order to get a warm place to sleep for a while. I wonder if I'd notice the difference between a homeless person who's sleeping and one who's slipped into unconsciousness. I can't even begin to guess what 'their shoes' are like in that particular ER.
 
lone wolf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

If your girlfriend waited 8 hrs for a simple prescription at an ER, then I'd say that's about what it should be. ER isn't for prescriptions, it's for emergencies.

As for this case, I'd be interested to know the facts.

Obviously you have a family doctor. ER is where I have to go to get scripts filled - even heart meds! The clinics don't know me. Anyone can walk in and say they need drugs. I'm also one of those people too patient for my own good....
Last edited by lone wolf; Sep 23rd, 2008 at 12:36 PM..
 
Praxius
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

Well, for starters Praxius, an ER isn't intended to serve as a family doctor or GP, even though that's what happens most often. ER's rank the seriousness of the matter. So if there are people coming in with serious need to see a doctor, they're going to get in faster than someone who needs an Rx filled.

I seen the people waiting the night both I and my girlfriend had waited, and their conditions were not at all anymore serious (I have good ears) and they all waited just as long, if not longer.... I'm not talking about being someone special who should go ahead of others, I'm talking about the BS people go through when they get there.

And I do have a family doctor..... now.

But my situation is irrelevent as it was a mere example. The main focus, is clearly that this homeless guy went to the ER for something serious.... if it wasn't serious, he wouldn't be dead now would he?

Someone dropped the ball on this one, and I wonder why, that is all.

Quote:

My wait times in NS ER's have been fairly short, because when I've been there it was for broken bones, ruptured ear drums and foreign objects piercing my body.

My GP fills my prescriptions.

Well my girlfriend moving from Australia, didn't have the luxury and had no other choice.

As it goes for me, I had what I figured was a broken wrist from work..... I waited for god know how fk'n long to get anybody to see how I was doing. Eventually I got pissed off and left and decided to let the god damn thing heal on its own, much like my toe.

What kind of a fk'n system is that where people simply walk away from something their damn tax dollars paid for? (Not venting at you, just asking in frustration about the system)

Quote:

But yah, 34 hours is out of the question, really ridiculous...I wonder what the man died from, and what he told the ER nurses at reception...time will tell I guess.

I'm curious as well.
 
Walter
#9
Apparently he didn't make himself known to the reception desk; the workers just thought he was coming in to get warm. Poop happens.
 
karrie
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by PraxiusView Post

As it goes for me, I had what I figured was a broken wrist from work..... I waited for god know how fk'n long to get anybody to see how I was doing. Eventually I got pissed off and left and decided to let the god damn thing heal on its own, much like my toe.

What kind of a fk'n system is that where people simply walk away from something their damn tax dollars paid for? (Not venting at you, just asking in frustration about the system)

I don't think that's a flaw in the system... that's a flaw in our own perceptions. A broken wrist is probably less emergent than a chest cold when it comes right down to it. Yeah, it hurts like a bitch and it does eventually need attention, but, you're not likely to die of it.... especially if it was an injured to a degree that you were willing to walk away without being seen, and remained unsure if there was actually a break. I know that to you a broken wrist seems like a huge injury, and severe pain. But to an emergency room worker, it's pretty minor and not worth checking up on you over, let alone hurrying you in if things are already busy.

There have been times we've been rushed in... loss of consciousness, severe bleeding, and impaired ability to breathe. There are times we haven't been rushed in, and a broken bone was one of those times.
 
tracy
#11
I have a hard time blaming them without knowing what was going on. ERs unfortunately have had to take the brunt of our lack of resources and our lack of common sense for years and years. MANY ER visits could be resolved through an appointment with a GP (but who wants to wait a week for an appointment if they have a GP) or a walk in clinic. Emergency rooms were never created to be used the way they are today. So, yeah, there will be a long wait. If you wait hours and live to complain about it, I can't say they were wrong to make you wait. It obviously wasn't emergent and they are after all pretty upfront about their purpose (emergency is in the name of the place for a reason).

I hope this man wasn't misdiagnosed or ignored because he was homeless. If he was, that's tragic. But, I'll wait to hear the rest of the story before assuming that because I know it's entirely possible he just came in to get warm and the staff allowed it.
 
lone wolf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by tracyView Post

I have a hard time blaming them without knowing what was going on. ERs unfortunately have had to take the brunt of our lack of resources and our lack of common sense for years and years. MANY ER visits could be resolved through an appointment with a GP (but who wants to wait a week for an appointment if they have a GP) or a walk in clinic. Emergency rooms were never created to be used the way they are today. So, yeah, there will be a long wait. If you wait hours and live to complain about it, I can't say they were wrong to make you wait. It obviously wasn't emergent and they are after all pretty upfront about their purpose (emergency is in the name of the place for a reason).

I hope this man wasn't misdiagnosed or ignored because he was homeless. If he was, that's tragic. But, I'll wait to hear the rest of the story before assuming that because I know it's entirely possible he just came in to get warm and the staff allowed it.

That's all fine and dandy for you in the land of milk, honey and Canadian doctors. WE have a shortage. They all went where the money is. If you happen to be one of the great many without a GP who need medical care in Canada now, you get second-rate care at a walk-in clinic ... or in ER.
 
B00Mer
#13
This is very sad. God bless this poor man and any family he may have.

I hope that Hospitals take a more serious look at their admitting procedures after this incident...
 
unclepercy
#14
I had an emergency situation in May, and it took me less than 2 minutes to see the dr. Then, there was the waiting around for the x-ray, the blood test, etc. I was in and out in 4 hours with prescription in hand for a mere $5,000. I am still paying off "my share."

My husband's current bout with cancer will cost about $300,000, and our share will run between $14,000 and $16,000. I've been through this before.

Uncle
 
Colpy
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by unclepercyView Post

I had an emergency situation in May, and it took me less than 2 minutes to see the dr. Then, there was the waiting around for the x-ray, the blood test, etc. I was in and out in 4 hours with prescription in hand for a mere $5,000. I am still paying off "my share."

My husband's current bout with cancer will cost about $300,000, and our share will run between $14,000 and $16,000. I've been through this before.

Uncle


I had a heart attack in April of 2007. in the hospital 3 weeks, had a qyadruple bypass, much post-op care, and it cost me nada, nil. That is the up side of socialized medicine.....care is good and free if you have a serious problem. the downside? Try and find a family doctor.....at least here in NB.....and WAIT to see any specialist or to have elective surgery.....
 
In Between Man
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

I had a heart attack in April of 2007. in the hospital 3 weeks, had a qyadruple bypass, much post-op care, and it cost me nada, nil. That is the up side of socialized medicine.....care is good and free if you have a serious problem. the downside? Try and find a family doctor.....at least here in NB.....and WAIT to see any specialist or to have elective surgery.....

It's the exact same scenario over here on the west coast. Although I've never bothered looking for a family doctor. There are a ton of walk-in clinics around here. Pretty easy to get a prescription or get a list of specialists to call. Another thing over here is that sometimes a semi-serious injury like a broken wrist or animal bite could net you a long wait in the emergency room. I've waited 2.5 hours just to get a quick brace for a busted finger!!!
 
tracy
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

That's all fine and dandy for you in the land of milk, honey and Canadian doctors. WE have a shortage. They all went where the money is. If you happen to be one of the great many without a GP who need medical care in Canada now, you get second-rate care at a walk-in clinic ... or in ER.

I was one of the many without a GP for years (including the last 4 down here, I just got a GP a few months ago). I went to walk in clinics. It wasn't ideal, but it is the place that is meant for people like me without a GP. If you go to the same clinic, they keep your records on file and it speeds things up a bit.

It isn't fair to blame the emergency room for a long wait when people are using it for a need it was never designed to meet.
 
lone wolf
#18
In Ontario, a specialist won't see you unless you are referred by a GP - and a clinic doc referral isn't forever.
 
Scott Free
#19
The OP is strange on a few levels.

1) Homeless people are notorious for being unstable and unpredictable. Nothing is being said about where he was found, why (or if) he was seeking help the whole time or who he talked to before dying. Was he in contact with the staff the whole time or did he wander off to be found unconscious later?

2) He came in at 3:00 pm for treatment: why didn't he get it? The story doesn't say. Was he drunk? Too high on meth? Being loud and abusive? Or was the staff too busy painting their toenails as is being implied?

3) By 1:00 am he was unconscious then pronounced dead but did he die from lack of treatment or was he run over by an ambulance? Maybe he passed out with his head between electric doors opening and closing on him all night?

4) "The Manitoba's conservative health critic" what is that!?!?! Is that an MLA in waiting? He claims this should never have happened... maybe he should find out what "this" is before saying it shouldn't have happened. Most people die in hospitals - it's really not that uncommon.

5) "I find this unbelievable. This is a horrible failure of our health care system," Myrna Driedger said. "We have been harping on the NDP government for many many years now, that we have a crisis in our ERs. We have been told numerous times by this government and by this premier that they are fixing it. This is not a fix of our health care system when a person dies in a waiting room."

I didn't see in the story where it said the NDP government or the premier were even at the hospital? Exactly what medical expertise do they have anyway? Maybe all those politicians standing around is why the staff didn't see the homeless guy, or maybe he was hiding in a box so the CIA wouldn't find him?

This appears to be a case of a reporter pulling a story out of his/her @ss and trying to give it significance and finding a willing participant in their created narrative from an unnamed conservative "health critic" (a title obviously meant to look important but in reality means nothing).

This is a prime example of why I don't like the popular media.
Last edited by Scott Free; Sep 24th, 2008 at 03:42 AM..
 
tracy
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

In Ontario, a specialist won't see you unless you are referred by a GP - and a clinic doc referral isn't forever.

No doc referral is forever.
 
TenPenny
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Obviously you have a family doctor. ER is where I have to go to get scripts filled - even heart meds! The clinics don't know me. Anyone can walk in and say they need drugs. I'm also one of those people too patient for my own good....

Actually, no, I don't...and there's a waiting list of about 4000 people here.

But I don't go to ER for prescriptions - that's what afterhours clinics are for.
 
TenPenny
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

In Ontario, a specialist won't see you unless you are referred by a GP - and a clinic doc referral isn't forever.

That's the way it works in NB, too. And guess what? The people who have serious, life threatening conditions, get seen pretty quickly. I've seen the system at work.
 
Praxius
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

I don't think that's a flaw in the system... that's a flaw in our own perceptions. A broken wrist is probably less emergent than a chest cold when it comes right down to it. Yeah, it hurts like a bitch and it does eventually need attention, but, you're not likely to die of it.... especially if it was an injured to a degree that you were willing to walk away without being seen, and remained unsure if there was actually a break.

I figured you or someone else would say that.

When the colouring of the area goes to a dark purple, hurts like a son'o'a'biatch, snaps, crackles and pops like rice crispies and is more bumpier then normal, I think it is safe to say it was broken.

Some of the reasons why I left was #1 - I have things I needed to do, that if I didn't, I would be out of work and #2 - I do have some background in some medical situations to know a thing or two on what is going on and what needs to be done...... I was far better off treating myself then waiting there for another unknown number of hours, missing time off work and no longer having a job.

You'd think that in a situation like that, work would give the time off or some form of protection due to medical reasons would give me more time to sit around and wait for my wrist to fuse together improperly due to idiots not doing their jobs, but there wasn't.

And the funny thing was some 15 year old girl came in screaming and crying her sorry *** off from breaking her ankle while playing soccer in high school..... oh.... and she didn't even wait 5 seconds before they dragged her in to get treated..... while I was waiting there for a few hours myself.

How fokked is that? I guess sports players get priority over people who have to actually work.

Then again, maybe I should have started crying and screaming my little head off too.

With my middle right toe that broke on the job (Twice I might add) I didn't even bother to go into the hospital because it would have been more of the same bullsh*t. And besides there wasn't anything they could do for a broken toe besides cast my entire foot up..... probably my leg my father mentioned.... and therefore I wouldn't be able to work regardless.

Apparently money comes first over health, because if you have no money in this sort of society, you're health follows suit.

Quote:

I know that to you a broken wrist seems like a huge injury, and severe pain. But to an emergency room worker, it's pretty minor and not worth checking up on you over, let alone hurrying you in if things are already busy.

Well thank you for marginalizing the situation, but to clarify, no, there was a total of maybe 8 people sitting around wondering what the hell was going on. All were vegitating, reading their magazines, and most had even more minor issues, like sore muscles, some arthritis issues, the flu, etc.

Above broken bones, there's not much else that could be more severe except maybe a plague, someone bleeding from the neck, an alien trying to lunge out from your stomach, an apendix exploding out of your nose, etc...... all of which I could very well understand someone going ahead of me..... but this wasn't the case in this paticular day.

All the nurses and doctors were just stolling along, shooting the sh*t back and forth, laughing it up about what so-in-so did the other day..... so don't tell me about their fk'n priorities.

Quote:

There have been times we've been rushed in... loss of consciousness, severe bleeding, and impaired ability to breathe. There are times we haven't been rushed in, and a broken bone was one of those times.

Yeah I seen a guy sitting two seats away from me who got himself to the ER after a car accident, was bleeding all over the god damn place, in and out of conciousness, and all they did was send a nurse out to give him something to cover his wound so he would stop making a mess..... he was sitting there for over an hour.

But hey.... he got there on his own, so I guess it wasn't at all serious.

I could understand your views if was talking about a situation where I went to a hospital in a big city with a hundred or so people sitting and waiting to be seen, but each time I have gone it's been no more then 15 or so people at a time sitting and waiting.

One person would go in per 45 minutes to an hour, if that.

And when I was a kid with a minor cold, I could remember as clear as day that I wasn't waiting around for any longer then an hour...... now with something even more serious, and not just myself but others, it's well over 3 hours on average.

So you may think there might not be anything wrong with the system.... I say there is.... esspecially when you compare it to 20 years ago. And since I have a few family members who work at a few of the hospitals around the province, and they too say it's nothing like it used to be and has gone down the crapper.... I'd have to disagree with your assumption.

And when some homeless guy enters the hospital and waits for 34 hours to see someone and then dies..... there is something seriously wrong.
 
Praxius
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

That's all fine and dandy for you in the land of milk, honey and Canadian doctors. WE have a shortage. They all went where the money is. If you happen to be one of the great many without a GP who need medical care in Canada now, you get second-rate care at a walk-in clinic ... or in ER.

Which is the case for many people where I am living..... over 50% of the population doesn't have a family doctor, because there arn't enough.... so they either have to goto a walk-in clinic and wait just as long as an ER, or goto the ER and wait just as long as the Walk-In Clinic.

And if you have a broken arm or leg or broken anything.... the walk-in clinics are just going to send you to the ER anyways to get treated, so you waste more time in the Walk-In and then waste even more time waiting in the ER.

What kind of a fokked up system is that?

Oh yeah, and I went to a walk-in one time after my toe started to change colour for about a week, and guess how long I waited there?

Four Hours.

I then got in, told them the situation, and they simply told me I must have dropped something on my foot and then sent me out the fk'n door.

I'm pretty sure I would remember dropping something on my own damn foot.

Walk-Ins are are peice of sh*t if you ask me...... so what's the only other solution?

The ER.

At least now I have a family doctor after having to move to where one was.

The whole medical system is a piece of crap.
 
Tonington
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by PraxiusView Post

Which is the case for many people where I am living..... over 50% of the population doesn't have a family doctor...

That's not true. NS has the best access to GP's in the whole country. It's only 1 in 20 Nova Scotians who don't have a family doctor. That's 95% with access, compared to the National average which is 86%. That's from the last Canadian Community Health Survey, five years ago. There's still a shortage, but not >50% of Halifax
 
lone wolf
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

That's the way it works in NB, too. And guess what? The people who have serious, life threatening conditions, get seen pretty quickly. I've seen the system at work.

So have I ... from an Ontario perspective - and went full arrest on the table. Maybe you have it better than you realize....
 
TenPenny
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

So have I ... from an Ontario perspective - and went full arrest on the table. Maybe you have it better than you realize....

Full arrest on the table is somewhat better than doing the same in an ambulance in a 20 min drive to the hospital!
But my mother's okay now.
Hope you are too.
 
lone wolf
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

Actually, no, I don't...and there's a waiting list of about 4000 people here.

But I don't go to ER for prescriptions - that's what afterhours clinics are for.

...except for those cases where the clinics ARE ER. That's a town the size of Sturgeon Falls and all of West Nipissing. Sudbury has about ten walk-ins - and due to municipal by-laws, they are closed between 10 pm and 8 am. Where do you go? ...ER. Work two-and-a-half minimum wage jobs to scratch by? Need script? The clinic's closed. Where do you go? ...ER.

There is a waiting list of over thirty thousand people in the Sudbury region alone. Federal health care cuts may have crippled the system. Mike Harris caps and cuts killed it in Ontario.... And this is the sort of Common Sense Harper wants to spring on Canada? Forget the gun control. Beware the owner....
 
Praxius
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

That's not true. NS has the best access to GP's in the whole country. It's only 1 in 20 Nova Scotians who don't have a family doctor. That's 95% with access, compared to the National average which is 86%. That's from the last Canadian Community Health Survey, five years ago. There's still a shortage, but not >50% of Halifax

I stand corrected.... of course I was going by memory on a study I read a few years back, but based on this in 2005:

"While the statistics show that Nova Scotians have the best access to family doctors in the country, many of our communities have experienced recruitment challenges leaving thousands of people with no family doctor...."

http://www.gov.ns.ca/news/details.asp?id=20050517003

chances are, things have changed since 2005..... but the report in which I got the 50% mark from was based on a rural study in places such as the Valley, South Shore, etc.... where it is hard to get doctors to move to..... or it was. Places like Sydney, the HRM, etc. have a 95%..... but of course the %'s differ depending on where you look.
 
Praxius
#30
Update:


A man waited 34 hours in the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre emergency room, but died without getting treatment.

Man who died waiting 34 hours in ER identified
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...923?hub=Canada

Quote:

A man who died while waiting 34 hours for care in a Winnipeg emergency room has been identified.

Brian Sinclair, 45, died at the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre (WHSC) in what some are calling the worst emergency room failure in Manitoba's history.

Sinclair, who was reportedly homeless, arrived at the emergency room on Friday at 3 p.m. He was finally attended to at 1 a.m. on Sunday and the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority said he was pronounced dead a short time later.

"For reasons we can't explain right now, he was never presented at the triage desk where we have triage nurses that assess someone's clinical situation," said Dr. Brock Wright, the head of the WRHA.

Wright now confirms what CTV Winnipeg reported Monday - that Sinclair sat dead in the waiting room for some time before anyone realized he had passed away.

A patient in the same hospital waiting room as Sinclair says he told nurses and security workers he was concerned about the man -- but says he was told they were too busy to check on him.

There you have it.

Quote:

The witness -- who spoke to CTV Winnipeg on the condition of anonymity -- said he was in the waiting room Friday evening. Sinclair, who had both his legs amputated, was sitting nearby in a wheelchair and appeared to be sleeping.

The witness said when he returned to the waiting area the next night Sinclair was sitting in the exact same position.

"I didn't think he was asleep, so we went to tell a nurse," said the witness, who was there with his wife. "The nurse said 'We'll go and check,' [but] nobody ever went and checked on him."

That sure sounds familiar. "Oh yeah, we'll get right on it." then when you turn the corner, they go back to chatting about what they did this past weekend.

Quote:

The witness said he waited an hour before asking another nurse to check on Sinclair but the nurse told him she was too busy and couldn't check right away.

The witness claims he told a security officer of the man's condition, but said the guard told him the case would be "too much paperwork."

FFS.....

Quote:

Sinclair is seen on the hospital's security camera footage when he arrived at the department's main entrance Friday afternoon.

He is not in the footage the entire time, but health officials say they believe the man was in the waiting room for the full 34 hours. It's also believed the man interacted with aides and cleaning staff, but not medical staff.

Why the hell wouldn't he have contacted medical staff? Apparently he was there for a reason.... I'm pretty sure he stepped foot into a hospital before and knew how the system worked, just like everybody else.... I'm sure he didn't amputate his legs by himself in the past.

What a cop out. He went to the hospital for a reason.... that reason, whatever it was, killed him..... the hospital is completely to blame as I see it, as witnesses even notified them about his visual condition, even if he didn't himself.... which I highly doubt.

I don't know of anybody, homeless or not, who just sits in a hospital ER for 34 hours just for the fun of it. Even if he was cold or some other poor excuse, he's gotta go eat and take a dump..... clearly it was serious enough for him to stay until someone checked on him.

Which never happened.

Quote:

"The challenge for us right now is to explain how it is somebody could be in the department for 34 hours and not have been brought forward to the triage desk area and be entered into the system," Wright said.

Maybe because he was homeless, probably didn't have an MSI card and therefore was told to sit down and someone would see him shortly?

Quote:

Wright said the system relies on people approaching the triage desk so that they can be placed in a queue based on the urgency of their medical needs. He said Sinclair was known to hospital staff, and said staff was surprised Sinclair wouldn't have checked in at the triage desk.

Maybe that had to do with his medical condition which he came in to get checked..... I hardly doubt that.

I bet dimes to doughnuts that he was known to them, he's been in a few times in the past for minor things, and they just figured this was another minor case and just told him to sit down.

Quote:

The chief medical examiner has determined the cause of death, but is still notifying family members. A critical incident review is now underway involving the Health Sciences Centre, its emergency department, and the WRHA.

Political fallout

The issue dominated question period at the Manitoba Legislature on Tuesday, as Progressive-Conservative Opposition Leader Hugh McFadyen demanded answers from Premier Gary Doer.

McFadyen accused the minister of knowing about the case when she held a news conference on Monday to announce a new contract with doctors.

"Thirty four hours, no attention, known to the minister at a time when she's out boasting about her record in health care. I want to ask the premier if he thinks it's appropriate that the Minister of Health was in front of the media yesterday, boasting in this house, boasting before this story broke, a story she was aware of, that she had overseen the worst emergency room failure in Manitoba history."

"We're treating this as a very, very serious situation," responded Doer. "We are investigating what went tragically wrong. And we admit to the people of Manitoba that it went tragically wrong."

Yeah you take it seriously now that someone died and your *** is in the sling.

Funny how no matter how much complaining and studies are done to prove and expose a problem, nothing ever is taken seriously until someone actually dies.

Quote:

Victim had kicked addictions: friend

Friends of Brian Sinclair told CTV Winnipeg he was a former solvent abuser who had kicked his addictions.

"We haven't seen him in a year," said Joseph Severeight. "He quit using solvents and things like that. And that's how I knew him, he cleaned up his life."

Sinclair's brother, Bradley, said he didn't know his brother had gone to the emergency room and was told by social workers that Brian had died.

"I feel awful, but I'm going to pray for him," he said.

Even when other patients waiting in line repeatedly brought their concerns to officials, they were just brushed off, or said it would be too much paper work.......

A little bit of fk'n paper work at the expense of someone's life?

Yeah.... ok..... makes me sick.

Though I best not get too sick over this..... I might have to end up in the ER and die.
 

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