Canadian sentenced to beheading in Saudi Arabia


Praxius
#1
http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2008/0...-canadian.html

Quote:

A Canadian has been found guilty of murder in Saudi Arabia and sentenced to beheading, the Canadian government confirmed on Monday.

Mohamed Kohail, a 23-year-old Montrealer who has been living temporarily in Saudi Arabia, was convicted of killing an 18-year-old student in a schoolyard brawl in the city of Jeddah in January 2007.

He has 80 days to appeal his conviction.

"We are deeply disappointed at the verdict handed down by Saudi authorities," said Bernard Nguyen, a Canadian Foreign Affairs spokesman.

He said Foreign Affairs Minister Maxime Bernier and Secretary of State Helena Guergis had been briefed on the situation and are following it closely.

"We are in close contact with the family and continue to provide consular services," Nguyen said. "The family continues to explore other legal avenues, including an appeal of this verdict."

Nguyen would not elaborate, citing the family's privacy.

Family friends urged the Canadian government to intervene more forcefully, alleging that Kohail was the victim of an unfair investigation and trial.

"I want the government here to ask on what basis the Saudi government decided this was first-degree murder," Mayada Jabri told Info690, a Montreal radio station.

"It was the influence of the [victim's] family which got a verdict that was not fair. I only want justice."

One family friend, who asked not to be named, told the Canadian Press the court ignored evidence that would have cleared Kohail's name. He said the young man's lawyers were repeatedly denied access to the courtroom.

He said Kohail's parents are livid. "They don't believe by any means they got a fair trial," he said.
Called to school to defend brother

Kohail allegedly got involved in the deadly brawl after his brother, Sultan, 16, called him to the school begging for help. A boy had accused Sultan of insulting a girl at the school, and Sultan wanted his older brother to defend him.

According to the brothers' previous accounts, Kohail arrived at the school with a friend to find a group of men waiting for him, some armed with clubs and knives. A fight erupted and Syrian Haraki died during the brawl.

Both Kohail and his brother were arrested and jailed in Jeddah, although the Globe and Mail reports that the younger brother has since been freed.

Kohail grew up in Saudi Arabia, but moved to Montreal as a teenager. He and his family temporarily moved back to Saudi Arabia to attend a wedding, but intended to return to Montreal, where they still own a home.

Dan McTeague, the Liberal critic for consular services, said he hopes the federal government acts swiftly to secure Kohail's release. He also urged Ottawa to investigate allegations that Kohail's confessions were given under duress.

 
DurkaDurka
#2
Sounds like we are going to have another round of the William Sampson affair, except this mans guilt or lack of is a little less clear.
 
s_lone
#3
Are we gonna see it on YouTube?
 
Praxius
#4
Update:



Canada to seek clemency for Montrealer facing beheading
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/st...n-affairs.html

Quote:

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has ordered government officials to seek clemency for a Montreal man facing execution in Saudi Arabia for killing a teen, a senior government source told CBC News.

Mohamed Kohail, 23, was sentenced to beheading after he was convicted of killing a student in a schoolyard brawl in 2007.

Foreign Affairs Minister Maxime Bernier said his department will do what it can to help the man's family appeal the death sentence.

It's unclear when Canada will make a clemency request for Kohail, who is jailed in the city of Jeddah. The appeal window closes in 30 days.

Bernier said he hopes Saudi officials make a "decision that will be in line" with Canadian values.

Kohail grew up in Saudi Arabia but moved to Montreal with his family as a teenager. The family had temporarily relocated back to the Middle Eastern country to attend a wedding but planned to return to Quebec where they still own a home.

In January 2007, Kohail allegedly became embroiled in a brawl after his 16-year-old brother, Sultan, called him to the school asking for help. Sultan wanted his brother to defend him after being accused by a schoolmate accused of insulting a girl.

According to his brother's account, Kohail arrived at the school with a friend to find a group of men waiting for him armed with clubs and knives. A fight erupted and a student died in the clash.

Both Kohail and his brother were arrested and jailed, though there are media reports his younger brother has since been freed.

Canada abolished the death penalty in 1976 and has often lobbied foreign governments for clemency for citizens facing execution.

Last November, however, Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day indicated a change in policy when he stated that the government would no longer help Canadians convicted of murder in democratic countries that support the rule of law.

 
lone wolf
#5
Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.... Harper won't exclude Canadians from execution in accordance with US law so he can't say Arab laws are any less just

Woof!
 
#juan
#6
If we think about this.....A Canadian 23 year old, with a friend, goes down to a school where his younger brother was embroiled in some kind of a disagreement. When he and his friend arrived at the school , there was an armed group waiting for them. In the ensuing battle another student is killed.
In Canada, we would expect a pretty harsh sentence, but several dozen people are beheaded every month in Saudi so this is not too surprising.

We don't have enough details to know who was to blame, but a 23 year old bringing a friend to a junior college to help fight his younger brother's battle, a battle in which another young student is killed doesn't sound like a situation where there will be much mercy shown. JMO.
Last edited by #juan; Mar 5th, 2008 at 12:30 PM..
 
no color
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.... Harper won't exclude Canadians from execution in accordance with US law so he can't say Arab laws are any less just

Woof!

I agree that this guy should face justice in the country where he committed his crime, provided he has a fair trial. Last October, the Harper gov'nt stated it would no longer seek clemency for Canadians on death row in the U.S. or other democracies where there has been "a fair trial."
 
Praxius
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

If we think about this.....A Canadian 23 year old, with a friend, goes down to a school where his younger brother was embroiled in some kind of a disagreement. When he and his friend arrived at the school , there was an armed group waiting for them. In the ensuing battle another student is killed.
In Canada, we would expect a pretty harsh sentence, but several dozen people are beheaded every month in Saudi so this is not too surprising.

We don't have enough details to know who was to blame, but a 23 year old bringing a friend to a junior college to help fight his younger brother's battle, a battle in which another young student is killed doesn't sound like a situation where there will be much mercy shown. JMO.

In a nut shell for me looking at supplied information, they came unarmed and prepared to defend their younger brother, they arrived with a group of people with weapons/knives. Now in my brief stint of being jumped by a bunch of punks, I know, as well as the officers knew, that in a situation like this, if you fear that your life and safety is at risk, you have every right to defend yourself.

Considdering these guys had knives and bats, etc. one could easily assume they intended to use them, which most of us know, you can easily die from a stab wound to many locations to your body and a bat can do plenty of damage all on it's own..... esspecially when you have multiple armed people coming to attack you.

These idiots brought the weapons, one of them died.... I think it balances things out if you ask me.

Not to mention the claims that his lawyers apparently wern't given fair treatment and acess to evidence that would have helped their case, I think beheading him for this situation is going too far. It sounds like the idiots he fought with (killed one of them) we're asking for it and they got it.

Don't start a fight if you can't finish it.... and don't bring weapons to a fight unless you expect those weapons to be turned on you.
 
lone wolf
#9
Not every nation on Earth subscribes to the principles of English Common Law.

Woof!
 
karrie
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.... Harper won't exclude Canadians from execution in accordance with US law so he can't say Arab laws are any less just

Woof!

In this case, he didn't do the crime. First degree murder deserving of the death sentence is, by almost any country's standards, a crime of forethought and intent. This was not. I don't blame the family for asking for help with this one. He should serve the appropriate sentence, yes, and he should serve it there IMO. But, the appropriate sentence.
 
DurkaDurka
#11
This sounds like a case for Team America-World Police.

 
lone wolf
#12
All they're likely guilty of is being foreigners. Maybe they should have brought a teddy bear named Mohammed.

Woof!
 
Tonington
#13
Quote:

Bernier said he hopes Saudi officials make a "decision that will be in line" with Canadian values.
...
Last November, however, Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day indicated a change in policy when he stated that the government would no longer help Canadians convicted of murder in democratic countries that support the rule of law.

Hmmm. So which values does Bernier mean? Our value on life, or our values on fair punishment as only a democracy can deliver? Seems to me this was exactly what the debate in the house of commons was about. Stockwell Day is on message, but Bernier's quote needs explaining.
 
Kreskin
#14
I don't think anyone should be sentenced to this sort of thing. Aside from that, that must be some wedding if he had to move his family there and enrol his brother in a Saudi school because of it. It makes me wonder how Canadian this guy is, or does he come here for medical vacations?
 
Scott Free
#15
"This is supposed to be a happy occasion! Let's not bicker and argue over who killed who!"

- Michael Palin
 
lone wolf
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

I don't think anyone should be sentenced to this sort of thing. Aside from that, that must be some wedding if he had to move his family there and enrol his brother in a Saudi school because of it. It makes me wonder how Canadian this guy is, or does he come here for medical vacations?

There was some mention in CTV news about Kohail being Sudan-born.

Woof!
 
Kreskin
#17
It's difficult to believe that these people are treated as allies.

http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/zw-c...e/Saudi_Arabia

Quote:


Local Laws

When you are in Saudi Arabia, be aware that local laws and penalties, including ones that appear harsh by Australian standards, do apply to you. If you are arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you but we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail.



Information on what Australian consular officers can and cannot do to help Australians in trouble overseas is available from the Consular Services Charter.



Penalties for trafficking, possessing or using drugs are severe and include the death penalty.

Homosexual acts are illegal and penalties include the death penalty.



Other offences punishable with the death penalty include murder, adultery, rape and abandoning religion (Islam).



Penalties for some criminal offences include corporal punishment and deportation. Theft-related offences may be punished with amputation, while offenders may be sentenced to lashes for other offences.



Preaching religions other than Islam may result in imprisonment and corporal punishment. The importation and use of alcohol, pork products, pornography (including images of scantily clad people, particularly women), religious books and materials (other than those reflecting orthodox Islam) is forbidden. Generally, individuals are able to bring one bible for private use.



Possession of alcohol may result in imprisonment and corporal punishment. Travellers have been detained on arrival in Saudi Arabia when police have detected the smell of alcohol on their breath.



Foreigners, particularly women, have reported incidents of assault after being approached by Muttawa (Religious Police). If approached by Muttawa, you should remain sensitive to the Muttawa's authority and seek to end the encounter as quickly as possible - if necessary, by leaving the area immediately.



Photography of official buildings, including government buildings, military installations, checkpoints, embassies and palaces is illegal and carries harsh penalties.

Women are legally required to wear the abaya, a long black coat that conceals their body shape, in all public places. The abaya is worn over loose-fitting, full-length clothing. While many local women wear a headscarf, foreign women are not generally required to follow suit. It is advisable, though, to carry a dark-coloured scarf in case you are confronted by the Muttawa.



Business travellers involved in a commercial dispute with a Saudi company or individual may be prevented from leaving the country until the dispute is resolved.

It is illegal for unmarried couples to live together. Hotels may refuse accommodation to couples unable to provide proof of marriage.


 
shadowshiv
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

It's difficult to believe that these people are treated as allies.

http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/zw-c...e/Saudi_Arabia

And for those many reasons, I will never travel to a place like that.
 
Kreskin
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by shadowshivView Post

And for those many reasons, I will never travel to a place like that.

I'm with you. I've no inclination to hang out with cave-dwelling savages (except the CC ones ).
 
normbc9
#20
I don't care where he is a citizen at. He was in their country, committed a crime, was convicted of that crime and now he has to be treated in accord with the host country laws. If it were a Saudi living here and he committed a crime here and was convicted what would we expect?
 

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