D-Day veteran goes missing from care home and is found in Normandy for commemorations


Blackleaf
+2
#1  Top Rated Post
When 89-year-old D-Day veteran Bernard Jordan was found to be missing from his care home last night, staff must have feared the worst.

They alerted police, who began searching the area around his home and checked with hospitals, bus firms and taxi companies.

The mystery was solved when the care home received a phone call from another veteran saying he had met Mr Jordan - on a coach on the way to France.

Mr Jordan had set off by coach from Hove, near Brighton, on the south coast of England, yesterday morning and checked into a hotel in Ouisterham, near Arromanches on the Normandy coast 109 miles to the south, last night to attend the D-Day 70th anniversary commemorations with his old comrades.

Police found the story highly amusing and Brighton commander Nev Kemp tweeted: ‘Love this: 89-yr-old veteran reported missing by care home who said he can’t go to Normandy for DDay70 remembrance. We’ve found him there!’

But one troubling and disturbing questions needs to be asked: Why were the care home preventing Mr Jordan from travelling to Normandy in the first place?

Bernard's Great Escape: D-Day veteran, 89, who was reported missing by care home staff is found in Normandy - after escaping to join his former comrades


Bernard Jordan, 89, sneaked out of The Pines care home, Hove, yesterday
D-Day veteran had been told by staff that he could not travel to Normandy
Donning war medals under a raincoat, he joined his comrades on a coach

Sussex Police were called and launched search for former mayor of Hove

But care home later received call from a younger veteran reassuring them Mr Jordan was safe and would return home after the celebrations were over

By Andy Dolan and Clare Elicott and Sara Smyth
6 June 2014
Daily Mail

Grounded by staff at his care home, Bernard Jordan faced missing out on an emotional return to the D-Day beaches.

So, summoning up the spirit and determination of June 6, 1944, he hatched a cunning plan to join his old comrades in honouring the fallen.

With his medals hidden under his coat, the 89-year-old told his carers he was off for a walk. Instead he boarded a coach for France.


Found: Veteran Bernard Jordan has been found in Normandy after travelling to France to mark the anniversary of D-Day. Above, the 89-year-old is pictured now (left) and during his time as a member of the Royal Navy (right)


Escape: Mr Johnson sneaked out of The Pines nursing home (pictured) yesterday after being told by staff he could not travel to Normandy. Donning his war medals under a raincoat, he joined his comrades on a coach

By the time staff realised he was missing the Royal Navy veteran was already in Normandy.

And, thanks to his great escape, Mr Jordan was yesterday able to stand proudly among world leaders and old soldiers in marking the audacious assault 70 years ago that cost more than 4,000 Allied lives.

He had left Hove in East Sussex on Thursday morning and checked in to a hotel in Ouistreham, near Arromanches, that night.

The alarm was raised at 7.15pm and police began searching the area around his home and checked with hospitals, bus firms and taxi companies.

The mystery was solved when the care home received a phone call from another veteran saying he had met Mr Jordan on a coach on the way to France.

The caller said Mr Jordan would be coming home when he was ready. Police found the story highly amusing and Brighton commander Nev Kemp tweeted: ‘Love this: 89-yr-old veteran reported missing by care home who said he can’t go to Normandy for DDay70 remembrance. We’ve found him there!’

The care home was at pains to stress that Mr Jordan had not been banned from attending the commemorations.




Former mayor: The veteran, who is yet to be formally identified by police, was mayor of Hove from 1995 to '96


Destination: After getting on the coach, Mr Jordan (not pictured) arrived at a hotel near the beach in Ouistreham







A spokesman for the Pines, which has been named as one of the best in the UK, said their ‘wilful and determined’ resident had been spurred in to action after staff had failed to get him on to the accredited trip with the Royal British Legion.

The spokesman said he had moved to the home in January when his wife Irene was admitted and was able to come and go as he pleased. He added: ‘Bernard is quite a character and certainly knows his own mind.

We fully celebrate his participation in the D-Day commemorations.’

Mr Jordan, who turns 90 next week, was the Conservative mayor of Hove in 1995-1996, during a colourful 34-year career as a leading councillor.

He has spent all of his life in the town, returning there to marry his sweetheart Irene at the end of the war.

In a newsletter in April, Mr Jordan talked fondly of being able to ‘serve the people of my town and do a job I loved’.

Pictured holding a photograph of himself as mayor, he warned anybody with designs on becoming a mayor that ‘you must be prepared to work hard’.

The proudest moment of his working life, he said, was meeting Margaret Thatcher, even though he had defected to Labour in 2000.


Celebrations: Hundreds of veterans are in Normandy today to pay tribute to those who gave their lives in the invasion. Above, a veteran (not Mr Jordan) salutes a grave during a memorial service at Bayeux Cemetery

The former company director added: ‘It was definitely one of my favourite memories. She was an amazingly strong lady.

‘When she visited Brighton I got the chance to meet her and it was a very proud moment for me.’

Garry Dunn, a fellow councillor and friend, said: ‘He was always very modest about the war. I know he was involved in D-Day but he would never talk about it.

‘He is the perfect example of a generation who did their duty, but didn’t feel they had to tell people what they had done. It makes me proud to be British because he is a proud Briton. He put his town and his country first, before him.

‘Rather than himself, people are more important to Bernie.’

Last night Mr Kemp clarified on Twitter that Mr Jordan had not been banned from going to France.


Paying tribute: Earlier today, the Queen bowed as she laid a wreath during a poignant service of remembrance in Bayeux, which was the first town in Normandy to be freed from Hitler's grip in 1944

A spokesman for Sussex police said: ‘We have spoken to the veteran who called the home and are satisfied that the pensioner is fine and that his friends are going to ensure he gets back to Hove safely over the next couple of days after the D-Day celebrations finish.’

The care home yesterday tweeted ‘now and then’ pictures showing Mr Jordan in his wartime naval uniform, and also posing with his medals in an armchair before he travelled to France.

Peter Curtis, chief executive officer of Gracewell Healthcare, which runs the home, said: ‘At no stage was Bernard banned from going to the commemorations.

We are in awe of the part Mr Jordan played in the D-Day invasion 70 years ago.’

Earlier this year, the Pines was judged one of the top 20 homes in the UK in the carehome.co.uk awards, which are based on 20,000 recommendations for homes from residents and their families.

Missing D-Day veteran found in Normandy celebrating with former comrades | Mail Online
Last edited by Blackleaf; Jun 6th, 2014 at 04:59 PM..
 
Sal
+1
#2
that is awesome!!!
 
Blackleaf
#3
The Great Escaper Bernard Jordan has arrived back in England from Normandy.

The D-Day veteran sailed back on a Britanny Ferries ferry. Britanny Ferries has said it has given him a free life pass to use their ferries for free to enable him to travel to Normandy whenever he wishes.

Here, Mr Jordan tells how he served on a destroyer hunting wolf packs of Nazi U-boats.

My mission to capture Enigma Code: Bernard Jordan on how he served on destroyer hunting 'wolf packs' of Nazi U-boats in Second World War


Bernard Jordan, 89, said he served on a destroyer in Second World War
He hunted 'wolf packs' of Nazi U-boats attacking Allied shipping convoys
'I was on mission to recover one of the Enigma machines,' he told friends
D-Day veteran captured nation's hearts after sneaking out of care home and boarding coach to France to join in 70th anniversary events

By Mark Nicol In Normandy and Nick Craven

7 June 2014
Daily Mail

Related article: 'I loved every minute... I'd do it again tomorrow!' 'Great Escaper' D-Day veteran, 89, who sneaked off from care home to go to 70th anniversary commemorations in Normandy returns to Portsmouth but says his trip 'meant the world' to him: 'Great Escaper' D-Day veteran Bernard Jordan says 'I loved every minute' | Mail Online



Bernard Jordan said he served on a destroyer in the Second World War hunting the ‘wolf packs’ of Nazi U-boats attacking Allied shipping convoys.


‘I was once on a mission to recover one of the Enigma machines from a U-boat which we’d forced to the surface by dropping depth charges, and crippling it,’ the 89-year-old Royal Navy veteran told friends.
‘We boarded the submarine and recovered the machine.’


War-changer: Bernard Jordan (pictured, right, as a Royal Navy Lieutenant) said he served on a destroyer in the Second World War. He was part of a mission to recover an Enigma coding machine (left) from a Nazi U-boat

Exactly which ship he was serving on at the time was not clear yesterday, but the successful British mission to seize the German code machines and their codebooks has been credited with changing the course of the war.

The first machine was seized by HMS Bulldog off Iceland in May 1941 when U-110 was forced to the surface and a boarding party seized the machine.

In another incident a few months later, HMS Petard sent a boarding party on board a U-boat, but two British sailors were drowned when the submarine sank.



Journey: Mr Jordan (centre) pictured onboard a ferry to France with a cabin crew and members of the Candy Girls entertainment troupe. Staff described him as a 'charmer' and said he had been a hit with the ladies



Drama: The first German code machine was seized by HMS Bulldog off Iceland in May 1941 when U-110 was forced to the surface and a boarding party seized the machine

Captured machines were taken to codebreakers at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire where they were able to intercept reams of encrypted German signals for years.

To this day, Mr Jordan, who captured the nation's hearts after sneaking out of his care home and boarding a coach to France to join in D-Day anniversary events, proudly wears his Atlantic Star medal.


Hero's welcome: D-Day veteran Bernard Jordan, 89, returned to Britain on a ferry after sneaking onto a coach to Normandy, declaring: 'I expect I will be in some trouble with the care home, but it was worth it'




Beloved: Bernard Jordan waves on deck with Captain Olivier Macoin (left) and ship duty manager Jim Crilley



'I just wanted to go over and join in with the commemorations,' he said. 'Being a veteran myself this was important to me and it meant the world. I met some great characters from old veterans to dancing girls'




Last edited by Blackleaf; Jun 8th, 2014 at 08:43 AM..
 
taxslave
#4
Good for him. I like people that ignore stupid rules and aythority.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Good for him. I like people that ignore stupid rules and aythority.

There are too much stupid rules, petty authority, PC and Elf n Safety madness in Britain and much of the Western world today.

WWII would have been lost had it been the same between 1939 and 1945.

"No! You can't storm the beaches of D-Day until we perform a thorough risk-assesment of all the beaches and made sure they have all received Blue Flags beforehand."

"No! You are not going on a bombing raid into Germany before you complete a six month Health and Safety at Work Awareness course and filled in all the appropriate risk assessment paperwork!"

Those dwindling WWII veterans like Mr Jordan must wonder what they hell they fought for when they see all this petty authority and PC nonsense.

As for Mr Jordan, it wouldn't surpise me if those numpties who run his "care" home now keep him chained to the radiator.



Quote:

The first machine was seized by HMS Bulldog off Iceland in May 1941 when U-110 was forced to the surface and a boarding party seized the machine.

In another incident a few months later, HMS Petard sent a boarding party on board a U-boat, but two British sailors were drowned when the submarine sank.

DAILY MAIL WEBSITE COMMENTS:

The Incredible bravery of the HMS Petard crew in securing the enigma codes was stolen by Hollywood and portrayed as a wholly American success. The same has been done with The Monuments Men which was a British operation. Why do they have to lie about these things? It dishonours the brave men who did these things.

Grantham, Downton


********************************
Quote...."The first machine was seized by HMS Bulldog off Iceland in May 1941 when U-110 was forced to the surface and a boarding party seized the machine." Unquote............Someone should tell "HOLLYWOOD", then maybe they can remake the film that claims a certain other Nation achieved this.

Dave, Fairlight-Hastings-England
***************************

What a great guy, God bless him! Gee! The Yanks must be ticked though, if you saw the movie "U571" they'd have you believe that they were the first to recover an Enigma machine!



Canadianraptor, Jurrasic Park West, Canada

********************************


The British roots of the Monuments Men




The Monuments Men: The Yanks are, once again, claiming credit for what was, in reality, a British success



While George Clooney’s film offers a Hollywood view of the true story to save Europe’s art treasure, few know about the very British brand of hero who helped pave the way for the Allied armies’ art detectives






With the release of George Clooney’s drama about the Monuments Men and their adventures in saving Europe’s art treasures during the Second World War, viewers get a glimpse of a true, dramatic, epic story of the race to rescue an estimated five million cultural heritage objects, from paintings and sculptures to rare books and valuable archival materials, that were looted by the Nazis and were threatened with complete destruction. The Clooney film is only loosely based on historical fact—it necessarily compresses, condenses and alters reality to fit the rules of a Hollywood feature. But one aspect of the Monuments Men that most American accounts skip past or exclude altogether is the fact that the Monuments Men began as a British operation—and was led by a very British brand of hero, Sir Leonard Woolley.














Last edited by Blackleaf; Jun 8th, 2014 at 08:18 AM..
 
DaSleeper
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post


The Monuments Men: The Yanks are, once again, claiming credit for what was, in reality, a British success



And your delusions have reached legendary proportions I this forum..............
 
lone wolf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Good for him. I like people that ignore stupid rules and aythority.

Spunky ol' bugger My hat's off to him
 
Sal
#8
he is wonderful!!!
 
#juan
+2
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Spunky ol' bugger My hat's off to him

I can't wait to see their excuses for not allowing him to go to Normandy in the first place. Too much effort, too expensive, too hard on an old guy, As it turned out, he didn't need them. I love it...
 
Blackleaf
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

And your delusions have reached legendary proportions I this forum..............
[/LEFT]


Oh dear.....
 

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