New Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 ‘Cyber Hijack’ Theory Emerges After ‘Vulnerabiliti


B00Mer
#1
New Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 ‘Cyber Hijack’ Theory Emerges After ‘Vulnerabilities’ Found In Inflight System

As the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 continues, investigators have come across some startling evidence that the plane could have been hijacked using a mobile phone or even a USB stick. The theory comes from a British anti-terrorism expert who says cyber terrorists could have used a series of “codes” to hack the plane’s in-flight entertainment system and infiltrate the security software.

According to Sally Leivesley, a former scientific adviser to the UK’s Home Office, the Boeing 777’s speed, direction and altitude could have been changed using radio signals sent from a small device. The theory comes after investigators determined that someone with knowledge of the plane’s system intentionally flew the jet off course.

“It might well be the world’s first cyber hijack,” Leivesley told the U.K.’s Sunday Express. “This is a very early version of what I would call a smart plane, a fly-by-wire aircraft controlled by electronic signals.”

Leivesley said that the evidence increasingly indicates that someone took over the plane’s controls “in a deceptive manner” and overwhelmed the plane’s system either remotely or from a seat on the plane.

“There appears to be an element of planning from someone with a very sophisticated systems engineering understanding,” she said. “When the plane is air-side, you can insert a set of commands and codes that may initiate, on signal, a set of processes.”

Investigators have also proposed that the pilots themselves could have switched the plane’s communication equipment off and redirected the plane west, but officials say it would have been very difficult for them to make the plane disappear from radar. Commercial aviation pilots who spoke with NPR said shutting down the system, which is designed to automatically communicate with ground control stations, is far more complicated than throwing a single switch.

“They said you'd have to go through big checklists, you'd have to possibly pull circuit breakers if you wanted to deactivate [all the communications equipment],” NPR’s Geoff Brumfiel told “All Things Considered” host Robert Siegel. “So, to do this, you'd have to have some degree of premeditation and a lot of knowledge of the aircraft.”

Further evidence supporting the cyber hijack theory comes from the fact that Boeing had previously expressed concern over the security of the plane’s systems, and had even contacted the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration for permission to change some of the onboard equipment. In August 2012, Boeing applied to have additional security installed aboard several of its 777 series aircraft.

Boeing was concerned that the aircrafts’ inflight entertainment system, which includes USB connections, could allow hackers to access a plane’s computer. The Federal Aviation Administration granted Boeing permission to change its inflight systems five months ago.

"The integrated network configurations in the Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER series airplanes may enable increased connectivity with external network sources and will have more interconnected networks and systems, such as passenger entertainment and information services than previous airplane models,” the U.S. Federal Register stated in a Nov. 2013 report. “This may enable the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and increased risks potentially resulting in unsafe conditions for the airplanes and occupants."

Last year, a Spanish researcher showed it was possible to hack a plane using a mobile phone. According to WTOP, during a presentation in April 2013 at the Hack-In-The-Box security summit in Amsterdam, Hugo Teso allegedly proved that with an Android smartphone, a specific “attack code” and an Android app called PlaneSploit, he could hijack both a plane’s system as well as the pilot’s display.

The FAA quickly denied Teso’s assertion that he could remotely commandeer a plane.

"The described technique cannot engage or control the aircraft's autopilot system using the FMS or prevent a pilot from overriding the autopilot," the FAA said in a statement following Teso’s demonstration. "Therefore, a hacker cannot obtain 'full control of an aircraft' as the technology consultant has claimed."

Source: New Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 ‘Cyber Hijack’ Theory Emerges After ‘Vulnerabilities’ Found In Inflight System

Related articles: Researcher hacks aircraft controls with Android smartphone • The Register

Hacker says phone app could hijack plane - CNN.com

https://www.google.com/search?q=hack...sm=93&ie=UTF-8

Could this have been a test run for terrorism using hacking of an airplane.

Putting the plane in one of the deapest parts of the Indian Ocean to mask the hacking and next US planes being attacked??

Just say'in!!
 
Locutus
+1
#2
CNN’s Don Lemon: ‘Is It Preposterous’ to Think a Black Hole Caused Flight 370 to Go Missing?

CNN’s Don Lemon: ‘Is It Preposterous’ to Think a Black Hole Caused Flight 370 to Go Missing? | Mediaite


a black hole.


really?

 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#3  Top Rated Post
That reminds me. . . I need to pick up a jar of mixed nuts today.
 
B00Mer
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

That reminds me. . . I need to pick up a jar of mixed nuts today.

Wow, really Iran and the USA, plus Israel have been trying to hack the shyte out of each other.. why not hack and crash a plane...

I guess you believe the power outage in the North East that took out New York City and parts of Canada was just a tree branch... not a DOS attack on a vulnerable server with access to the outside Internet which over loaded the systems.

Fukking people run around with blinders on believing what mainstream media fees them..



There was 2 people flying with false passports on this fight.. that in itself should be a red flag, like this is a common occurrence.

Who just happen to be Iranian.

Iranians travelling on flight MH370 on forged passports 'not linked to terror' | World news | theguardian.com

Big deal they have no known links to terror as they know.. does not mean they were no involved. Duh!!
 
coldstream
#5
It seems that the debris found by satellite imagery is leading to a much less dramatic hypothesis. The debris is in an area consistent with the intersection of the last course of the jet and the limits of its fuel capacity if it had been on autopilot and flying at altitude.

This would support a theory that the pilots were incapacitated with hypoxia (lack of oxygen) through some kind of leak of cabin pressure. Another piece of evidence supporting this is the transcript of the communication with the jet.. which had an odd repetitive message prior to loss of contact along with lack of a conventional signoff.. perhaps a sign that the pilots were already being incapacitated unawares by loss of oxygen.. which would lead to irrational and uncoordinated responses to the crisis (including disengaging and re-engaging the autopilot)

I'm sure they'll find the plane, at the bottom of the ocean, 2 - 3 miles down and about 300 miles to west of where they noticed the first debris. And it'll likely take months to locate it and search for the black boxes. But i haven't seen much notice given of this.. but then again it is so much more pedestrian than cyber attacks or black holes.
Last edited by coldstream; Mar 22nd, 2014 at 02:03 PM..
 
darkbeaver
#6
How come we know the two guys with the false passports is Irainyin?

Quote: Originally Posted by coldstreamView Post

It seems that the debris found by satellite imagery is leading to a much less dramatic hypothesis. The debris is in an area consistent with the intersection of the last course of the jet and the limits of its fuel capacity if it had been on autopilot and flying at altitude.
This would support a theory that the pilots were incapacitated with hypoxia (lack of oxygen) through some kind of leak of cabin pressure. Another piece of evidence supporting this is the transcript of the communication with the jet.. which had an odd repititive message prior to loss of contact along with lack of a conventional signoff.. perhaps a sign that the pilots were already being incapacitated unawares by loss of oxygen.. which would lead to irrational and uncoordinated responses to the crisis (including disengaging and re-engaging the autopilot)
I'm sure they'll find the plane, at the bottom of the ocean, 2 - 3 miles down and about 300 miles to west of where they noticed the first debris. And it'll likely take months to locate it and search for the black boxes. But i haven't seen much notice given of this.. but then again it is so much more pedestrian than cyber attacks or black holes.

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
I'm pretty sure it's goin to be Irainyins. Some unnamed Israeli called Soros said it was.
 
lone wolf
#7
Where's Mulder and Scully when you need 'em?
 
petros
#8
A very successful weapon test.
 
lone wolf
#9
Two asylum seekers and two pirates in pawn shop racks tripping up in explanations.... You might be closer than you think
 

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