Here We Go Again


SLM
#1
Potentially tainted meat shuts down Edmonton plant

An Edmonton meat processor temporarily shut down by inspectors over a Listeria scare has a history of citations by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

In a phone conference on Friday afternoon, the food inspection agency said it has issued 11 correction requests to Capital Packers in recent years, and five of those tickets remain open.
The company recalled 378 cases of ham sausages on Thursday after a worker's sleeve tested positive for the bacteria Listeria. Each case has 10 packages of meat.
"Capital Packers Inc. will not be able to resume operations until the CFIA is confident in its capacity to manage safety risks," CFIA spokesperson Paul Mayers told reporters.
All products at the plant are currently under CFIA detention and control.
The agency said it is conducting an investigation to determine if products shipped from the plant pose a risk to consumers. The sausages were sold at Loblaws and Sobeys stores in Western Canada under the Compliments and Capital brands.
"Our investigation, which immediately was initiated on receipt of the notification of the result, uncovered that indeed some product had been distributed," said Mayers.
However, Mayers noted that none of the sausages had tested positive for Listeria and the recall is a precaution to ensure that the potentially tainted meat doesn't end up in the hands of consumers.
In 2008, 22 people died and dozens of others became sick after eating Listeria-contaminated deli meats from a Maple Leaf Foods plant in Toronto.
So far, there have been no reports of illness from eating the Capital Packer's sausages.
Company president Brent Komarnicki admitted Friday that poor record keeping led to suspension of the plant's operating licence.
"We have an ineffective recall program that we need to resolve and improve on, so the documentation is readily available for the inspectors when they request it," he told The Canadian Press. "That is where our failure was."
Komarnicki pledged to work with CFIA officials to fix the problem, however, he stressed that the license suspension had nothing to do with food hygiene at the plant.
"We were not able to properly provide them the documentation around this recall program and that is what threw us into suspension," he said.
"It is not to do with the quality of the product or the plant cleanliness or sanitation or anything like that."
According to the CFIA, Capital Packers had its license temporarily suspended for a week in Sept. 2011 due to ventilation and condensation issues in the plant.
The suspension comes about a week after XL Foods in Brooks, Alta. resumed shipping products following an E. coli scare that led to the largest beef recall in Canadian history.


Potentially tainted meat shuts down Edmonton plant | Sympatico.ca News

Quote:

In a phone conference on Friday afternoon, the food inspection agency said it has issued 11 correction requests to Capital Packers in recent years, and five of those tickets remain open.

And they're cutting back on inspectors why again?
 
CDNBear
+1
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

And they're cutting back on inspectors why again?

It's funny we rely so heavily on enforcement to do what society should do itself.

That is to say that if a company provides faulty or inferior products, it goes out of business because consumers won't patronize them.

I find it equally funny that we haven't heard about small abatoirs/processors finding themselves in similar situations. Now I fully understand that that can be because they are either not considered news worthy or just don't make the top of the list at CFIA.

I'm more than happy with the meats we get processed locally at a small operator, or the local butcher, or the wild game we butcher ourselves.
 
SLM
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

It's funny we rely so heavily on enforcement to do what society should do itself.

That is to say that if a company provides faulty or inferior products, it goes out of business because consumers won't patronize them.

Because rightly or wrongly, that's they system we have in place I suppose. Yes, society should be shutting down unreliable suppliers but I think there is so much bureaucracy in between 'violations' and 'the public' the right information isn't getting out there.

Whether it's right or wrong to rely on them, it is what it is. Everyone in the entire chain is reliant from the processors right through to the consumer. So if that's the system that they/we are trying to maintain, why are we monkeying around with it?

Quote:

I find it equally funny that we haven't heard about small abatoirs/processors finding themselves in similar situations. Now I fully understand that that can be because they are either not considered news worthy or just don't make the top of the list at CFIA.

I'm sure there are some small processors that are in similar situations but I, again whether rightly or wrongly, have a bit more faith in smaller businesses to keep their nose clean on their own. That could just be my bias sure, but it's based on seeing the correlation between the smaller business owner (of whom I know many) and how personally invested in the outcome of their product/service is. My impression, although general again, is that the bigger you get, the further away ownership gets from the finished product, the more it becomes skewed to bottom line concerns vs product/service quality concerns. Small business operators care about the bottom line too of course, but I've just got the impression that it's more balanced.

That's why I personally will try to shop locally and with smaller business whenever possible, although sometimes it's just not economically feasible.

Quote:

I'm more than happy with the meats we get processed locally at a small operator, or the local butcher, or the wild game we butcher ourselves.

If I could find a decent local butcher I'd be willing to spend a little more for the quality.
 
CDNBear
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Because rightly or wrongly, that's they system we have in place I suppose.

Because people have become complacent and lazy, giving up their influence and control over what they consume to people who claim to know better.

Ok, I realize I'm in a more advantageous position where produce and meat is involved. I am more apt to catch or harvest my fish and meat than I am to purchase it. I also have the luxury of knowing a farm owner who thinks along the same lines as I do.

But my position cannot be unique. I know it isn't.

I'm not the only one that purchases lamb, pork, poultry, fowl, chicken and duck eggs from my buddy. He also sells to other friends, and family and friends of those friends. And he's only owned the farm since last spring.

There has to be more farmers out there like that.

Quote:

So if that's the system that they/we are trying to maintain, why are we monkeying around with it?

It's obviously not working. Although the cuts certainly aren't going to fix it.

It's time we did.

Stop buying inferior over processed packaged meat or produce.

I watch people put sweat equity into their home, myself included, but fail to put any energy into what they put in their bodies.

Sure, you can shop fairly healthy, at a premium, because it's right there at the corner market. But with a little more energy, you can get a better product, at a better price by doing some of the leg work yourself. Hell, the opportunity to make money at it is there as well, as my youngest and my buddy's son have proven by selling duck and chicken eggs, and whole ducks and chickens to their friends parents.

They aren't making money hand over fist, but they are making money, and they are selling a superior product at much better price than the local NoFrills.

Quote:

That could just be my bias sure, but it's based on seeing the correlation between the smaller business owner (of whom I know many) and how personally invested in the outcome of their product/service is. My impression, although general again, is that the bigger you get, the further away ownership gets from the finished product, the more it becomes skewed to bottom line concerns vs product/service quality concerns. Small business operators care about the bottom line too of course, but I've just got the impression that it's more balanced.

Bingo! In a capitalist market profit will always triumph over people.

The small business owner is personally invested, both financially and by reputation. The quality of my product was always a reflection of ME!

And being honest, my ego just won't settle for less than, when it comes to what I produce.

Quote:

That's why I personally will try to shop locally and with smaller business whenever possible, although sometimes it's just not economically feasible.

Because there are lot of middle men and large producers who are trying to control the products before they get to the large urban centers.

A short drive out of most urban centers can put you in a whole new market.

Quote:

If I could find a decent local butcher I'd be willing to spend a little more for the quality.

You really don't always have to. A good start is to get some friends together, and look for a local butcher who sells meat packages. Buy in bulk and divvy it up. Ask if he is buying processed things like sausages and ground meat, or is he doing it himself. Ask whether it's local beef, pork, poultry or fowl.

Go to farmers markets, talk to the the vendors, find the ones that are selling their own harvested or produced goods. Start making deals.

We buy corn on the cob over in Beaverton, right off the farm that grew it. I've never had better corner.

I know petros jokes about free range chickens and other humourous things, but he's absolutely correct! They are far superior to what you can buy at most local chains. And if you can find a farmer who sells them, you can buy in bulk and freeze or sell to friends to defer any costs in transportation.

You know those hand painted signs at the end of farmers driveways that say stuff, read them, they are usually selling the produce. From fresh eggs to fresh meat and poultry. Stop and talk to them.

I wish everyone was able to enjoy the fresh meat and produce my family does. I'm not bragging, but food is important to us all. Large scale producers are not in the business to bring you the best quality and priced product they can. they're in the business to make a product that can pass off as the best they can offer while maintaining a hefty bottom line.
 
SLM
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Because people have become complacent and lazy, giving up their influence and control over what they consume to people who claim to know better.

Ok, I realize I'm in a more advantageous position where produce and meat is involved. I am more apt to catch or harvest my fish and meat than I am to purchase it. I also have the luxury of knowing a farm owner who thinks along the same lines as I do.

But my position cannot be unique. I know it isn't.

I'm not the only one that purchases lamb, pork, poultry, fowl, chicken and duck eggs from my buddy. He also sells to other friends, and family and friends of those friends. And he's only owned the farm since last spring.

There has to be more farmers out there like that.

You're right, absolutely. I know when I was a kid my mom would do exactly the thing you're talking about. We were more rural then of course, being in the city does make one a tad lazy. Also, having your kids grown and out of the house (well until recently anyway, lol) has an impact too. I've gotten into the habit of buying premium because as a single individual it's not that cost prohibitive.

Quote:

It's obviously not working. Although the cuts certainly aren't going to fix it.

It's time we did.

Stop buying inferior over processed packaged meat or produce.

I watch people put sweat equity into their home, myself included, but fail to put any energy into what they put in their bodies.

Sure, you can shop fairly healthy, at a premium, because it's right there at the corner market. But with a little more energy, you can get a better product, at a better price by doing some of the leg work yourself. Hell, the opportunity to make money at it is there as well, as my youngest and my buddy's son have proven by selling duck and chicken eggs, and whole ducks and chickens to their friends parents.

They aren't making money hand over fist, but they are making money, and they are selling a superior product at much better price than the local NoFrills.

No it isn't working, because the system is failing obviously. Maybe like the personal electronics industry we need to go smaller instead of the trend of bigger?

Quote:

Bingo! In a capitalist market profit will always triumph over people.

The small business owner is personally invested, both financially and by reputation. The quality of my product was always a reflection of ME!

And being honest, my ego just won't settle for less than, when it comes to what I produce.

It's not just you, most of the small business owners I know of I'd describe in the exact same way. The overwhelming majority of businesses in this country are small businesses.

It always makes me laugh whenever I hear people slamming the corporate tax incentives and cuts in this country. I know they're picturing companies like Rogers and Bell but in reality the benefit goes to family run companies providing most of the products and services in the country.

Quote:

Because there are lot of middle men and large producers who are trying to control the products before they get to the large urban centers.

That's true I'd say of the majority of industries out there. Middle men produce nothing but the convenience factor, that's all. But the question that needs to be asked is: Are people going to be willing to give up strawberries in the dead of winter, as tasteless as they may be?

Quote:

A short drive out of most urban centers can put you in a whole new market.

You really don't always have to. A good start is to get some friends together, and look for a local butcher who sells meat packages. Buy in bulk and divvy it up. Ask if he is buying processed things like sausages and ground meat, or is he doing it himself. Ask whether it's local beef, pork, poultry or fowl.

Go to farmers markets, talk to the the vendors, find the ones that are selling their own harvested or produced goods. Start making deals.

We buy corn on the cob over in Beaverton, right off the farm that grew it. I've never had better corner.

I know petros jokes about free range chickens and other humourous things, but he's absolutely correct! They are far superior to what you can buy at most local chains. And if you can find a farmer who sells them, you can buy in bulk and freeze or sell to friends to defer any costs in transportation.

You know those hand painted signs at the end of farmers driveways that say stuff, read them, they are usually selling the produce. From fresh eggs to fresh meat and poultry. Stop and talk to them.

I wish everyone was able to enjoy the fresh meat and produce my family does. I'm not bragging, but food is important to us all. Large scale producers are not in the business to bring you the best quality and priced product they can. they're in the business to make a product that can pass off as the best they can offer while maintaining a hefty bottom line.

I actually do try to shop at markets whenever I can and pay attention to signage to find local produce. But it can be time consuming and I'll admit that laziness plays a role, lol.
 
gerryh
#6
Under the regulation, all meat destined for sale or distribution, without exception, must originate from livestock or poultry slaughtered in provincially licensed or federally registered establishments, or imported from a federally recognized source.
In Ontario, no one can sell, transport, deliver or distribute meat unless:
  • The animal was inspected prior to slaughter (antemortem), approval for slaughter in accordance with the Meat Regulation, and the carcass was inspected following slaughter (post-mortem) and was approved for use as food in accordance with the Meat Regulation or the regulations under the Meat Inspection Act (Canada);
  • The animal was slaughtered in a plant operated by a provincially licensed operator or a federally registered establishment; and
  • The meat is stamped, labelled or tagged with an inspection legend.
In addition, no person can operate a slaughter facility without a licence.





Hey Bear, your buddy the "farmer" meet and follow the above regs?
 
CDNBear
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

I've gotten into the habit of buying premium because as a single individual it's not that cost prohibitive.

That's true.

Quote:

No it isn't working, because the system is failing obviously. Maybe like the personal electronics industry we need to go smaller instead of the trend of bigger?

I won't say that smaller is completely infallible, but KISS comes to mind.

Quote:

That's true I'd say of the majority of industries out there. Middle men produce nothing but the convenience factor, that's all. But the question that needs to be asked is: Are people going to be willing to give up strawberries in the dead of winter, as tasteless as they may be?

With the invention of the mason jar, you don't have to.

Quote:

I actually do try to shop at markets whenever I can and pay attention to signage to find local produce. But it can be time consuming and I'll admit that laziness plays a role, lol.

Sweat equity in ones diet is as rewarding as it can be in ones home.

Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

Hey Bear, your buddy the "farmer" meet and follow the above regs?

All the lady from the Ministry of Agriculture told them was, if they slaughtered it on the farm, it had to be butchered on the farm. No problems there. We butchered it down to quarters, and took it to a butchers.

Our lamb, pork, ducks, chickens, were ours. If you get my how to get around the law drift.
 
gerryh
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

If you get my how to get around the law drift.


Ya, I get your "drift". Personally, when I was running my hobby farm, EVERYTHING went to the local abattoir for killing and inspection. Kept things safe from a health, legal, and insurability prospective. Plus I supported local business that way.
 
SLM
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

That's true.

Having the kids here recently I've been toying with the idea of buying a small freezer though and just giving it to them when they leave. I'd say if you have more than two mouths to feed, it's definitely worth exploring the bulk buying options if you want the quality.

Quote:

I won't say that smaller is completely infallible, but KISS comes to mind.

Nothing's infallible but with distance (like with ownership to finished product) can also produce dissociation. Not always, but enough that it becomes a factor for consideration in my opinion.

Quote:

With the invention of the mason jar, you don't have to.

But now we're back to extra work not to mention storage. Not to sound like a broken record but my condo is small, lol.

Quote:

Sweat equity in ones diet is as rewarding as it can be in ones home.

Won't argue that. While I don't necessarily go to the extent that you do in acquiring your food, I am a big 'home cooked' proponent. So I start with the best ingredients as I can reasonably access and I feel that makes a difference.
 
CDNBear
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

Ya, I get your "drift". Personally, when I was running my hobby farm, EVERYTHING went to the local abattoir for killing and inspection. Kept things safe from a health, legal, and insurability prospective. Plus I supported local business that way.

Oh anything that goes to people outside our circle is taken to Lindsay to be slaughtered, then to our local butcher.

Him and I being the exception, because we own the animals we slaughter and butcher. I have no worries, the animals are healthy at the time of slaughter and we've been quartering game for years with no issues.

Once quartered, if there's a cut or product I want that I am not capable of doing, I take it to the butcher who does my venison specialty cuts, sausages and pepperettes. Making the cost even lower for us. Even so, the cost to have it slaughtered in Lindsay is minimal, and adding the cost of butchering, it still comes in at roughly half the price of an inferior product at NoFrills.

Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Having the kids here recently I've been toying with the idea of buying a small freezer though and just giving it to them when they leave. I'd say if you have more than two mouths to feed, it's definitely worth exploring the bulk buying options if you want the quality.

It's a wise purchase.

Quote:

But now we're back to extra work not to mention storage. Not to sound like a broken record but my condo is small, lol.

Sweat equity.

Quote:

Won't argue that. While I don't necessarily go to the extent that you do in acquiring your food, I am a big 'home cooked' proponent. So I start with the best ingredients as I can reasonably access and I feel that makes a difference.

It does, I just don't see the need to pay a premium for something that should be the norm.
 
taxslave
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Potentially tainted meat shuts down Edmonton plant
An Edmonton meat processor temporarily shut down by inspectors over a Listeria scare has a history of citations by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
In a phone conference on Friday afternoon, the food inspection agency said it has issued 11 correction requests to Capital Packers in recent years, and five of those tickets remain open.
The company recalled 378 cases of ham sausages on Thursday after a worker's sleeve tested positive for the bacteria Listeria. Each case has 10 packages of meat.
"Capital Packers Inc. will not be able to resume operations until the CFIA is confident in its capacity to manage safety risks," CFIA spokesperson Paul Mayers told reporters.
All products at the plant are currently under CFIA detention and control.
The agency said it is conducting an investigation to determine if products shipped from the plant pose a risk to consumers. The sausages were sold at Loblaws and Sobeys stores in Western Canada under the Compliments and Capital brands.
"Our investigation, which immediately was initiated on receipt of the notification of the result, uncovered that indeed some product had been distributed," said Mayers.

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
More inspectors is not what is needed. Heafty fines and a month or so of down time for non compliance is what gets their attention. Same with worksafe. Fine the unsafe companies out of business so the rest of us can compete.
 
tay
#12
More Inspectors are needed as was the revelation at XL.

Harper feels 'companies will self regulate'.

So we must ask ourselves, "why are there such things as regulations and where did they come from"?

And the answer is companies of all types will take 'financial shortcuts' on safety in the hopes that nothing goes wrong and if it does, no one will blame them.


CFIA questions accuracy of lab that tests for salmon anemia

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has called into question one of the world's top reference laboratories over its detection of infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAv) in B.C. farmed salmon.


more


http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/Food...ions_accuracy/
Last edited by tay; Nov 25th, 2012 at 04:47 AM..
 
petros
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

And they're cutting back on inspectors why again?

Because irridation legislation is coming. All food will be irridated before leaving a packing plant rendering it disease free.

it's not like a switch can be flipped and irridation equipment falls from the sky and drops in to place in an instant. The transition wil take time.

Then there is letting the tears dry because somebody lost the job they weren't doing properly to protect consumers.
 
Cliffy
+3
#14  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Sweat equity in ones diet is as rewarding as it can be in ones home.

Hey Bear, I found your hunting stand.

 
Goober
#15
I know about that plant and it ain't pretty
 
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