Feeling left out, chiefs go to court


CDNBear
#1
Feeling left out, chiefs go to court

Category: NEWS Created on Tuesday, 03 April 2012 14:43 Last Updated on Wednesday, 30 November -0001 00:00 Published Date By: Mary Agnes Welch


MANITOBA'S First Nations will go to court today to stop a new 20-year deal to keep the Mounties in the province.
Led by the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, the First Nations say they were left out of negotiations between Ottawa and the province on the new RCMP operation-and-funding agreement signed Thursday.

"They certainly didn't consult with me and my First Nation," said Pine Creek Chief Charles Boucher. "We want a meaningful partnership."

Boucher will join Grand Chief Derek Nepinak and others this morning for a press conference once their application has been filed in court. They will argue the new agreement should be postponed because Ottawa and the province "neglected to consult with First Nations in Manitoba in respect of the police services provided with respect to their traditional territories," according to a news release.
Boucher said the RCMP, Ottawa and the province ought to have conducted a proper needs assessment on reserves before signing the agreement. He said RCMP officers working on reserves need better vehicles, more manpower and more training.

"No disrespect to the RCMP, but the gaps do exist," said Boucher Monday night.

And, by excluding First Nations from negotiations, the federal and provincial governments missed a perfect opportunity to discuss long-term solutions to on-reserve crime and policing, said Boucher. That could have included more First Nations people hired into the RCMP or the creation of another aboriginal-run police force like the Dakota Ojibway Police Service.

The 20-year contract, called the provincial police services agreement, broadly lays out how and where the RCMP will fight crime in the province. It also commits Manitoba to paying roughly 70 per cent of the cost of the RCMP, with Ottawa picking up the balance.

The new 20-year deal renewed the original agreement reached in 1992.
 
gerryh
#2
isn't policing of reserve land a federal only responsibility? As in the province has no say in on reserve policing? If that is the case, why would the First Nations be included in negotiations between the feds and the province for provincial police funding? Or is it a joint province, fed, and reserve responsibility?
 
CDNBear
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
That was downloaded ages ago. If the res doesn't have their own force, the local Constabulary answers the call.
 
gerryh
+1
#4
well, that being the case, the Reserves should have had input into their policing.
 
CDNBear
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

well, that being the case, the Reserves should have had input into their policing.

Seems reasonable.
 
gopher
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

isn't policing of reserve land a federal only responsibility? As in the province has no say in on reserve policing? If that is the case, why would the First Nations be included in negotiations between the feds and the province for provincial police funding? Or is it a joint province, fed, and reserve responsibility?

In the States each Nation has its own police force such as in NYS the Saint Regis Akwesasne and the San Carlos N'de in Arizona. Res lands often cross county or state borders so that self policing is very important to guarantee order.
 

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