Property rights could unlock native reform


dumpthemonarchy
#1
This is a start to assist and improve the lives of First Nations in Canada, they will be able to actually own a house, gain equity from it, and do what they want with the money. With over 600 reserves in the country, it won't work everywhere, but it will work on some and people's lives will get better and the heavy hands of band leadership and the fed govt will be lifted a bit.



http://www.thestar.com/opinion/edito...-native-reform




Property rights could unlock native reform

Published On Sat Jan 28 2012



First Nations chiefs listen to speeches during the Crown-First Nations gathering in Ottawa. (Jan. 24 2011)
FRED CHARTRAND/THE CANADIAN PRESS
Christopher Alcantara







Prime Minister Stephen Harper met with indigenous leaders in Ottawa last week to discuss how they might “reset the relationship” between aboriginal and non-aboriginal peoples.

Unfortunately, Canada’s experience with major policy reforms affecting aboriginal peoples does little to inspire confidence.
In 1969, for instance, the federal government proposed solving the “aboriginal problem” forever by terminating “Indian” status and dismantling the Department of Indian Affairs.

And in 2005, Ottawa and native leaders negotiated the Kelowna Accord, which promised to inject billions of dollars into chronically underfunded aboriginal policy areas, such as housing, education, economic development, and health, among others. It was never implemented.

These and other mega-reform packages failed mainly because they were too comprehensive — the political costs of implementing them were too high for any politician to endure.

Learning from this history, the Harper government has committed to pursing incremental reform.
One example is the proposed First Nations Property Ownership Act (FNPOA), a piece of legislation being developed by Chief Manny Jules with the blessing of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Prime Minister’s Office.

In essence, Chief Jules’ legislation will allow First Nations to opt out of the land management provisions of the Indian Act to restore the more efficient and effective individual and collective property rights that aboriginal peoples enjoyed prior to the Indian Act.
Once this legislation is passed, the Crown will transfer underlying title and jurisdiction to reserve lands to those First Nation communities that have opted into the legislation.

With underlying title and jurisdiction, the First Nation community would gain ownership of their land forever, even if non-aboriginal peoples acquired “fee simple” property rights to parts of the reserve.

This would be similar to what happens off-reserve when Canadians buy land. Although we may own our land in fee simple, the Crown owns the underlying title, thus preserving the land base of the country.

Underlying title and jurisdiction also gives the First Nation community the power to regulate land usage, either through zoning, taxation and even expropriation under certain circumstances, such as for the construction of public works.

More important, underlying title allows First Nation communities to subdivide a portion of their reserve land into fee simple lands for individual members to use. Band members could then use these fee simple lands to generate wealth through mortgages, loans, and buy/sell transactions, much like Canadians do off-reserve, but without any of the hassle of dealing with significant bureaucratic red tape that most members have to endure under the Indian Act.

Finally, the FNPOA would create a new, First Nations-controlled Torrens-land registry system, which experience has shown to be the best way to create secure and efficient record-keeping of land title and ownership.

In sum, the FNPOA is a model for how the federal government should approach aboriginal policy reform.

In particular, the federal government needs to listen to First Nations and help them develop parallel legislation that First Nations can voluntary enter into to escape the constraints of the Indian Act.

Significant change to aboriginal-settler relations in Canada is unlikely to happen in any other way and indeed may produce the type of transformative policy reform that leaders and policy-makers have long pursued but have yet to accomplish.
 
Cliffy
+1
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

This is a start to assist and improve the lives of First Nations in Canada, they will be able to actually own a house, gain equity from it, and do what they want with the money. With over 600 reserves in the country, it won't work everywhere, but it will work on some and people's lives will get better and the heavy hands of band leadership and the fed govt will be lifted a bit.

Finally, the FNPOA would create a new, First Nations-controlled Torrens-land registry system, which experience has shown to be the best way to create secure and efficient record-keeping of land title and ownership.

In sum, the FNPOA is a model for how the federal government should approach aboriginal policy reform.

In particular, the federal government needs to listen to First Nations and help them develop parallel legislation that First Nations can voluntary enter into to escape the constraints of the Indian Act.

Significant change to aboriginal-settler relations in Canada is unlikely to happen in any other way and indeed may produce the type of transformative policy reform that leaders and policy-makers have long pursued but have yet to accomplish.

Yup! Whitey know best. Dump, do you ever come up for air? Has anybody consulted the aboriginal peoples on this or is this just some white putz blowing smoke up his own butt?
 
dumpthemonarchy
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Yup! Whitey know best. Dump, do you ever come up for air? Has anybody consulted the aboriginal peoples on this or is this just some white putz blowing smoke up his own butt?

Why don't you move to Sudan, Egypt, Libya, Peru, Bolivia, or Yemen and see how fantastic their economies are doing. Reading would help your IQ more than you know.
 
damngrumpy
#4
Actually this discussion has gone on for some time and its also been on CBC radio for
sure. There are a lot of hurdles to jump before this is a reality and its full of problems
as well. Some of the concerns from natives themselves include some people on the
Reserve itself buying up the land, from those who are cash strapped or without the
financial education to understand their rights. This has implications for their share of
the resource rights as well. If you no longer have a place on some reserves your share
of monies may be less and so on. There is also a problem with unscrupulous developers
as well. I can't remember all of it but I have heard several conversations.
I reserve judgement myself because I don't know enough to make an informed decision
yet
 
dumpthemonarchy
#5
Discussion is one thing, owning property is another, and that has generally not occurred on reserves. What works for millions of homeowners in Canada might work for aboriginals too. Owning land is quite simple, working to buy things is quite simple too. For some reserves, that have no mineral rights, this will work better than other reserves that do. There is no one fits all solution here, and the status quo is no longer tenable. There is going to be change and movement here and its about time.
 
Omicron
#6
I'm trying to find a tribe strong enough to hold the suicide bomb of Canada.

What happened was that PM King demanded to know why Americans wanted Canadian Uranium in the middle of the war.

PM King said he would deliver it at the border, but not unless Americans told UofT's what that Uranium was wanted for.

The result was that at the end of WW-II, three nations knew the secret of atomic-bombishness.

England because that is where it was started before they asked America for the research to be moved there to keep it away from German bombing.

Canada because PM King would consult his mother in dreams told him to hang onto it.

And the US because they paid for it.

Why do you guys let Lucifer destroy agriculture via Monstanto when it would only cost 30% more per chicken for it to be good to eat?

The difference is pay one dollar for a sick piece of Monsanto bird-meat, versus one-dollar thirty cents for one delicious chicken I can live on, which I can sell at a premium to chicken loving China.

Anyway, I apologize for my abuse of of the excellent sense of maintaining a border ever since they went nuts... it's like they had no education... actually... that's exatually what happened... they had no eduction...

tunes.digitalock.com/fromsmal...thingscome.mp3 (external - login to view)

I have one question.

Those bullies able to beat me up.

How do I tell them different from the evil ****ing pieces of prick I can freely kill according the God's progression towards all of our kids ketting better?

Ouch my Maoist caretaker just told me to sing less loud.

I got into a situation where I had to give Lucifer a place unto his own universe versus crap, followed by Chinese saying maybe it is a situation that should be forgotten about...
Last edited by Omicron; Feb 1st, 2012 at 04:25 AM..
 
L Gilbert
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

This is a start to assist and improve the lives of First Nations in Canada, they will be able to actually own a house, gain equity from it, and do what they want with the money. With over 600 reserves in the country, it won't work everywhere, but it will work on some and people's lives will get better and the heavy hands of band leadership and the fed govt will be lifted a bit.

You seem to have this dismal image of natives that is somewhat askew. Want to know why I say that? Look here: Osoyoos BC, British Columbia Canada | NK'MIP Resort (external - login to view)

And that isn't the only place in BC that FN peoples have developed. Look here: Success Stories (external - login to view)

Omicron, are you ok, dude?
 
Cannuck
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

Prime Minister Stephen Harper met with indigenous leaders in Ottawa last week to discuss how they might “reset the relationship” between aboriginal and non-aboriginal peoples....

....One example is the proposed First Nations Property Ownership Act (FNPOA), a piece of legislation being developed by Chief Manny Jules with the blessing of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Prime Minister’s Office.

Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Yup! Whitey know best. Dump, do you ever come up for air? Has anybody consulted the aboriginal peoples on this or is this just some white putz blowing smoke up his own butt?

Did you even bother to read the article?
 
TenPenny
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by OmicronView Post

I'm trying to find a tribe strong enough to hold the suicide bomb of Canada.


I would like to post a random incoherent string of bits of information that has nothing to do with the thread. I once knew a native guy that borrowed a car from a friend of a brother of a cousin of my next door neighbor.

He voted in a provincial election, and in that election an incumbent MLA was defeated.

In Bermuda, the taxi driver asked if we went to New York City on vacation, as that's where he liked to go sometimes. It certainly was challenging, but in the end, the US was definitely there.
 
captain morgan
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

I would like to post a random incoherent string of bits of information that has nothing to do with the thread. I once knew a native guy that borrowed a car from a friend of a brother of a cousin of my next door neighbor.

He voted in a provincial election, and in that election an incumbent MLA was defeated.

In Bermuda, the taxi driver asked if we went to New York City on vacation, as that's where he liked to go sometimes. It certainly was challenging, but in the end, the US was definitely there.

I can't help but wonder about the role that cheese-doodle dust and maple kreullers might have on the dynamism in this debate over wine selection in the presence of 3 or more Labour Party supporters and the Greenwich Meridian.

Clearly there is a strong relationship and this must be understood prior to any conversation that may involve Canada's First Nations and the geological make-up of deep sea vents.
 
L Gilbert
#11
lol.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

You seem to have this dismal image of natives that is somewhat askew. Want to know why I say that? Look here: Osoyoos BC, British Columbia Canada | NK'MIP Resort (external - login to view)

And that isn't the only place in BC that FN peoples have developed. Look here: Success Stories (external - login to view)

Omicron, are you ok, dude?

Have you ever watched TV and see a place called Attawapiskat? Does something, anything, seem askew there?

There are success stories, but half the kids in BC in Social Services are aboriginal, with 5% of the population, does that sound askew? TB and FASD other diseases are on the rise.
 
L Gilbert
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

Have you ever watched TV and see a place called Attawapiskat? Does something, anything, seem askew there?

There are success stories, but half the kids in BC in Social Services are aboriginal, with 5% of the population, does that sound askew? TB and FASD other diseases are on the rise.


So you think everything about aboriginal change should happen overnight? It takes time to change things.
 
SLM
+2
#14  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

I can't help but wonder about the role that cheese-doodle dust and maple kreullers might have on the dynamism in this debate over wine selection in the presence of 3 or more Labour Party supporters and the Greenwich Meridian.

I've lost sleep over that one myself.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post


So you think everything about aboriginal change should happen overnight? It takes time to change things.

For too many reasons, very little has been happening. Now something has to happen as the overall education and health of aboriginals is not improving at present at a pace that justifies $10 billion a year from the Dept of INAC.

Letting aboriginals buy their own house is not a radical concept for 99% of Canadians, so letting this occur, is strickly in the "why wasn't this done 30 years ago" category. Harper faces no backlash from the public here on this. The chiefs are on the hotseat and have to adjust in a new, dynamic environment.
 
Mowich
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Yup! Whitey know best. Dump, do you ever come up for air? Has anybody consulted the aboriginal peoples on this or is this just some white putz blowing smoke up his own butt?

"One example is the proposed First Nations Property Ownership Act (FNPOA), a piece of legislation being developed by Chief Manny Jules with the blessing of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Prime Minister’s Office."

Perhaps you missed this sentence, Cliffy. Manny Jules is the Chief of the Kamloops band and a very forward thinking NATIVE.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by MowichView Post

"One example is the proposed First Nations Property Ownership Act (FNPOA), a piece of legislation being developed by Chief Manny Jules with the blessing of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Prime Minister’s Office."

Perhaps you missed this sentence, Cliffy. Manny Jules is the Chief of the Kamloops band and a very forward thinking NATIVE.

A sign that aboriginals see the only way out is to get MONEY. You know, the stuff Kevin O'Leary says he loves. As O'leary knows, once you get money in this world, you get POWER. And you might get on TV and show off.

People compare this to the Metis selling their scrip in the 19th century. There are people in the Indian industry who want to keep them dependent forever, it is no longer a public benefit to keep antiquated laws in effect that no longer benefit people. Time for Indians to be more like Kevin L. End the junk nation talk, get money and join the world.
 

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