Pork tenderloin... and no meat thermometer


Zan
#1
Save On Foods is having a twofer sale on pork tenderloin. Excellent deal, if you get a chance, you should go pick a couple up.

I want to serve one tomorrow night to some company. It's 2 lbs and crusted with seasonings and herbs, and I found a method of cooking it on the net that looks like it might work - I don't have a meat thermometer, so I can't cook it to an internal temp, I have to rely on weight, time and oven temp. Has anyone tried this before? If so, how'd it turn out? If you think it's a bad method, have you got a tried and true method that won't dry it out?

ingredients


  • 1 lb boneless pork tenderloin (approximate)
  • salt and pepper
  • dry seasoning, of your choice (thyme, savory, rosemary, garlic powder, onion powder, Italian seasoning, or a mixture)
Directions

  1. 1

    NOTE: The success of this cooking method will depend upon how accurate the temperature of your oven is and how well your oven retains heat. Adjust cooking time +/- according your individual oven.
  2. 2

    Determine the EXACT weight of roast from the meat wrapper. Weight will determine how long to cook the roast.
  3. 3

    Preheat oven to 500-550 degrees. Remove tenderloin from refrigerator. Season meat as desired. Place seasoned meat in an uncovered roasting pan.
  4. 4

    Bake EXACTLY 5 1/2 minutes PER POUND. Adjust +/- according to your oven's accuracy and heat retention. Turn oven OFF and DO NOT open oven door for 1 hour. Remove from oven and let rest 5 minutes to redistribute internal juices. Roast will be done, very slightly pink in the center, and very moist.
  5. 5

    NOTE:******* For anyone questioning this method of cooking, it really does reach the proper internal temperature on a thermometer. If you have a thermometer that has a wire that goes through the side of the oven door, by all means use it and set alarm for 140-145 degrees. It should go off before the hour is up. After resting 5-10 minutes, the roast should reach 145-150 degrees.
  6. 6

    According to Sara Moulton on FoodTV, salmonella is killed at 138 degrees, and 145 is a safe temperature for pork, although the USDA recommends 160 degrees (meat will be drier).
  7. 7

    VARIATION: To make Roasted Veggies along with the tenderloin, peel carrots and potatoes, and cut into about 1-inch cubes. Season as desired and drizzle with a little oil. Add vegetables to pan around (but NOT touching) pork tenderloin. Cook tenderloin as instructed above. The roasted potatoes and carrots should be done when the roast is done. You may need to adjust the size of the potatoes and carrots depending upon the weight of your tenderloin and how long you cook it.
 
CanadianLove
#2
I always have the best luck cooking meats like that by, throwing in a lot of veggies beside it, covering them with tinfoil, turning the oven to 250 and going to the bar. 6hrs later there is a juicy tasty meal, cooked in its own juices and will never burn at 250. Always moist and tender. Could be I'm so $hit faced I don't notice though.
 
Zan
#3
lol - well then clearly I've been doing it wrong all this time!
 
rufus
#4
We buy pork tenderloin all the time. I usually wrap it in tin foil and cook it in a 350 degree oven for about an hour depending on the size.
If it isn't seasoned I put barbecue sauce over it and then wrap it in foil.
It always comes out tender and juicy. If I use barbecue sauce I save the sauce to serve over white rice with the meat.
 
VanIsle
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by ZanView Post

Save On Foods is having a twofer sale on pork tenderloin. Excellent deal, if you get a chance, you should go pick a couple up.

I want to serve one tomorrow night to some company. It's 2 lbs and crusted with seasonings and herbs, and I found a method of cooking it on the net that looks like it might work - I don't have a meat thermometer, so I can't cook it to an internal temp, I have to rely on weight, time and oven temp. Has anyone tried this before? If so, how'd it turn out? If you think it's a bad method, have you got a tried and true method that won't dry it out?

ingredients



  • 1 lb boneless pork tenderloin (approximate)
  • salt and pepper
  • dry seasoning, of your choice (thyme, savory, rosemary, garlic powder, onion powder, Italian seasoning, or a mixture)
Directions

  1. 1

    NOTE: The success of this cooking method will depend upon how accurate the temperature of your oven is and how well your oven retains heat. Adjust cooking time +/- according your individual oven.
  2. 2

    Determine the EXACT weight of roast from the meat wrapper. Weight will determine how long to cook the roast.
  3. 3

    Preheat oven to 500-550 degrees. Remove tenderloin from refrigerator. Season meat as desired. Place seasoned meat in an uncovered roasting pan.
  4. 4

    Bake EXACTLY 5 1/2 minutes PER POUND. Adjust +/- according to your oven's accuracy and heat retention. Turn oven OFF and DO NOT open oven door for 1 hour. Remove from oven and let rest 5 minutes to redistribute internal juices. Roast will be done, very slightly pink in the center, and very moist.
  5. 5

    NOTE:******* For anyone questioning this method of cooking, it really does reach the proper internal temperature on a thermometer. If you have a thermometer that has a wire that goes through the side of the oven door, by all means use it and set alarm for 140-145 degrees. It should go off before the hour is up. After resting 5-10 minutes, the roast should reach 145-150 degrees.
  6. 6

    According to Sara Moulton on FoodTV, salmonella is killed at 138 degrees, and 145 is a safe temperature for pork, although the USDA recommends 160 degrees (meat will be drier).
  7. 7

    VARIATION: To make Roasted Veggies along with the tenderloin, peel carrots and potatoes, and cut into about 1-inch cubes. Season as desired and drizzle with a little oil. Add vegetables to pan around (but NOT touching) pork tenderloin. Cook tenderloin as instructed above. The roasted potatoes and carrots should be done when the roast is done. You may need to adjust the size of the potatoes and carrots depending upon the weight of your tenderloin and how long you cook it.

Zan,
Save-On also sells a neat meat thermometer for about $9.95. I have done demo's in the meat department and the thermometer they sell is the same one they gave me to use for demo's. It's battery operated and not much bigger than a ball pt. pen. I was cooking pork schnitzel and had to cook it to at least 75C to serve to the public. It's at the end of a row with all the handy dandy cooking things like garlic presses (I think there is a bunch of Starfrit stuff there and some stainless steel cooking things.)I assume it will be in the same general area of any store.
Those two for one's you are talking about also come stuffed - you can have it either way. I bought two of the stuffed.
 
#juan
#6
Zan

I cook pork tenderloin at least half a dozen times a year. My favorite recipe calls for a one pound tenderloin to be cooked 35 minutes at 375 degrees F, and a two pound tenderloin 55 minutes at 375 degrees. This generally gets them just a bit pink in the middle but not raw. Good luck....
 
Risus
#7
I cook pork tenderloins wrapped in tinfoil on the BBq. It comes out excellent.
 
Nuggler
#8
.......550 degrees sounds a tad high.

We usually do it at 350, covered, with seasoning, and in a bit of water for about an hour or so.

Why would you not use a thermometer? Why Why Why???

Another method is to split the loin, and whack it around on the BBQ for about 20 minutes. We've never done this, but had it at a friends, and it was good.

Now ya got me hungry.




PS Why is your Beagle driving on the wrong side of the car??
 
Zan
#9
MMmmmmm - all the methods here sound so tasty! I think I'll just pop it in the oven for an hour at 350ish for an hourish and hope for the bestish lolll... A side of pork and mushroom gravey will cover any sins if I mess it up. I have a bad habit of over cooking meat 'cause I'm always worried about food borne thingies lurking around in the pinkness... but apparently I need to get over that. Thanks everyone!


Nuggz, the Beagle is test driving an import!
 
YukonJack
#10
I think pork tenderloin is grossly overrated.

Give me ham or smoked pork hocks anyday.
 
Unforgiven
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by YukonJackView Post

I think pork tenderloin is grossly overrated.

Give me ham or smoked pork hocks anyday.

It's all good!

As you can see there are so many ways to cook pork tenderloin.
One more way is to cut it into medallions and use a quick marinade on it. There is also this stuff, Montreal steak, rib, and chicken rub. I've covered it with that, a shot of chipolte Tabasco and liquid smoke in a bag and set for a couple hours, then pan fried the medallions. Very nice with mashed potato and veg with just a little brown gravy on the spuds and pork.

The pork is tender enough but it also has the seared crust on the edges of the medallions that brings the flavour up.
 
#juan
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by ZanView Post

MMmmmmm - all the methods here sound so tasty! I think I'll just pop it in the oven for an hour at 350ish for an hourish and hope for the bestish lolll... A side of pork and mushroom gravey will cover any sins if I mess it up. I have a bad habit of over cooking meat 'cause I'm always worried about food borne thingies lurking around in the pinkness... but apparently I need to get over that. Thanks everyone!

Zan the only way I know to completely eliminate the pink without drying the tenderloin out is to braise it. We just bought a new stove(six months ago)and everything including the oven and the elements stay hot for an awfully long time after you turn them off. Cooking an uncovered tenderloin starting with 550 degrees in our stove, after an hour, might turn out a pork tenderloin briquette......I'll have to try it though.

PS --For what it's worth there is a recipe under Pork recipes for pork tenderloin(Pork Medallions) that always works very well.....no pink..
 
YukonJack
#13
I agree, that it is all good, Unforgiven. In fact let me say, without the slightest bit of prejudice, that Muslims and Jews deprive themselves some of the greatest culinary pleasures.

My preference to ham and hocks (not to mention, which I forgot: back ribs) to tenderloin is about the same as my preference of thighs and drumsticks to chicken breasts.
 
YukonJack
#14
Further to my post #13.

As a kid, back in the old country, one of my greatest joy was to participate the annual butchering of a fattened old pig.

The only thing that went waste there were the tips of the pig's toes and the contents of its intestines.

Bacon, sausage, headcheese - add these to tenderloin as GREAT food.
 
petros
#15
Pork? Ummm, okay. If you want an awesome tenderloin (pork will do I guess) cooked indoors, sear the meat, spice it and put in a roasting bag with oven @ 240C -260C broil, flipping it every five mins or so. You won't lose squat for moisture or any of the "jus"
 
VanIsle
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Pork? Ummm, okay. If you want an awesome tenderloin (pork will do I guess) cooked indoors, sear the meat, spice it and put in a roasting bag with oven @ 240C -260C broil, flipping it every five mins or so. You won't lose squat for moisture or any of the "jus"

I sear every roast beef I cook. Depending on the size of the pork tenderloin, I may do it too. Often they are too tiny to bother searing. If you sear the meat, you really don't need the bag - just the lid is fine. For about the last 10 min. of cooking I remove the lid. Gives a final "browning" to the roast and browns the pan up for good gravy. I have never used a bag and I cannot imagine getting really nice brown gravy with one.
 
DaSleeper
#17
I like to marinate pork tenderloin overnight with chili lime sauce ........and mustard to cut down a bit on the "heat" and cook it all the next day in a slow cooker with about an inch and half of sweet red wine or if using a dry wine I spread sliced carrots around ...just to add a bit of sweetness to blend the bite of the chili sauce......If I want it for lunch instead of for dinner ......same mixture in the oven at 325 until well done..I haven't heard of a case of tapeworm in 40 years but I don't take any chances with pork..
All grocery stores carry meat thermometers....or Canadian Tire, Home hardware etc....
 
Andem
#18
I cook pork tenderloin often. I don't own a meat thermometer but if I'm unsure, I'll cut it open around the thickest part and check the colour. If there's a tiny bit of red, I'll eat it, otherwise, it stays in longer. That works for me because I usually slice it and serve it so the original cut is not noticed by any guests!
 
DaSleeper
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by YukonJackView Post

Further to my post #13.

As a kid, back in the old country, one of my greatest joy was to participate the annual butchering of a fattened old pig.

The only thing that went waste there were the tips of the pig's toes and the contents of its intestines.

Bacon, sausage, headcheese - add these to tenderloin as GREAT food.

Probably even blood sausage using the cleaned and washed intestines as a "holder" for said blood to put in the boiling pot for cooking..
The best blood sausage I've ever tasted were made by a lady from Trinidad......yum!!
and in Quebec...Head Cheese and "Ragout de pattes de cochon"
 
Nuggler
#20
...Me dear ol mum used to be paranoid about cooking pork, and could story on for hours about people who died eating it undercooked. Probably their refrigeration was not up to par, but, hoooonose? Better safe than dead.

When she cooked it, you could easily cut it with a .......cold chisel. But there was nice "crackling" on the top. With the advent of lean pork, we get shortchanged on the "crackling". But, probably the meat is safer.

So, Zan, you're probably doing the right thing by slightly overcooking pork. Slightly, that is.

Nothin like some good dead pig.
 
#juan
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by AndemView Post

I cook pork tenderloin often. I don't own a meat thermometer but if I'm unsure, I'll cut it open around the thickest part and check the colour. If there's a tiny bit of red, I'll eat it, otherwise, it stays in longer. That works for me because I usually slice it and serve it so the original cut is not noticed by any guests!

Exactly right Andem. An eyeball check is best. If the meat is almost white with just a trace of pink, it is just about perfect.
 
Zan
#22
I'm happy to report the tenderloin was amazing. When I read such a variety of methods for this cut of meat - all proclaiming delicious, juicy results, I felt a bit safer to just relax and cook the damn thing lolll.

I ended up just covering it with foil and roasting it for about 45 minutes, and let it sit for about 15. It was perfect!

I had to work today, so I was literally trying to pull a dinner together in under an hour before my guests got here. I had my daughter put a pan of M & M's stuffed pasta shells in the oven before I got home from work, then kept them on the warmer burner while the pork roasted, then while the roast settled, I reheated some homemade salt and pepper wings I'd made last night along with some foccacia bread, sliced up a variety crisp fresh veggies with an assortment of dips and voila, a quick meal everyone enjoyed.

I'm usually a bit of a snob when it comes to serving 'store bought' food to company - but I have to say the stuffed pasta was also superb. It went nicely with the pork, and had a really nice 'home made' flavour. I'd recommend them if you want a nice side dish in a hurry. (I transferred them to a casserole dish before I put them on the warmer, topped them with a blend of 3 cheeses and everyone thought I made 'em myself, but I couldn't take the credit)

Anyway, it was a good night....my dinner was a success, and the company was wonderful. I'm well sated with food and gratitude for the love of good friends.
 
talloola
#23
OK you guys that does it, I'm going out in the morning to buy a pork roast for
dinner tomorrow night.
Our Save on foods closed down and left this area, will have to shop elsewhere.
Thanks
 
#juan
#24
Zan

I tried your original 550 degree recipe last night and it worked fine. I thought my stove might retain the heat a bit longer than most so I peeked and made a little cut at forty minutes and it was still a tiny bit too pink....I gave it another 15 minutes or the rest of the time on the timer . I cooked a few small carrots and potatoes along side the tenderloin and I reheated some leftover beef gravy, zapped some broccoli, and it was a pretty decent meal.

PS...It was still a little more pink than I liked at the big end. I no doubt cooled the oven off a bit when I checked so the hour stated in the original recipe was probably correct.......
 
karrie
#25
Porkloin roast is one of those things that I pick up at Costco, and do a wide variety of stuff with it. I cut some up into stirfry meat, cube some for skewers, cut some up into chops, and reserve some as roughly 2lb roasts. It's an almost fool proof meat.

Much of the time, I'm pulling a roast out frozen from the freezer, throwing it in the crock pot on low in the morning with some spices, and coming home in the evening to a wonderful roast ready to become pulled pork. Add whatever sauces you want (a can of mushrooms and some barbeque sauce is a hit with my family), and you've got a great pot of comfort food to serve with biscuits. A nice quick warm meal.
 
#juan
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Porkloin roast is one of those things that I pick up at Costco, and do a wide variety of stuff with it. I cut some up into stirfry meat, cube some for skewers, cut some up into chops, and reserve some as roughly 2lb roasts. It's an almost fool proof meat.

Much of the time, I'm pulling a roast out frozen from the freezer, throwing it in the crock pot on low in the morning with some spices, and coming home in the evening to a wonderful roast ready to become pulled pork. Add whatever sauces you want (a can of mushrooms and some barbeque sauce is a hit with my family), and you've got a great pot of comfort food to serve with biscuits. A nice quick warm meal.

Karrie
Are you talking about a pork loin roast or a pork tenderloin? They are subtly different.

Cook's Thesaurus: Pork Loin Cuts (external - login to view)
 
karrie
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Karrie
Are you talking about a pork loin roast or a pork tenderloin? They are subtly different.

Cook's Thesaurus: Pork Loin Cuts (external - login to view)

sorry... tenderloin.
 
L Gilbert
#28
hmmm
We buck up the tl into 3cm thick medallions and cook them in a variety of ways: BBQed, sauteed with mushrooms, stir fried with veggies and served with chow mein or yakisoba, etc.
 

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