Beef Recipes

VanIsle
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by talloolaView Post

thanks, I'll check that out

Talloola, I have family that have lived here for quite a few years and probably know where you can get that kind of beef. I have family all the way from here to Blackcreek so one of them must know the answer. As a family, we too have been talking about buying a side of beef so we were planning on looking into it anyway.
 
#juan
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by talloolaView Post

Juan, do you know if there is any good farm raised beef
on this part of the island, that would be organic, and
no injections of anything, well, maybe a flue shot? lol

The farmer I've been getting the lamb from used to put up a hindquarter. A hindquarter is usually about a hundred and fifty pounds at something around $4.00 a pound. Since we moved from the mainland we haven't had a big enough freezer so we usually bought just a whole loin. I will talk to this guy in the next week or two and let you know if he is still in the business........Right now he is in the Caribbean getting a tan or whatever.
 
talloola
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

The farmer I've been getting the lamb from used to put up a hindquarter. A hindquarter is usually about a hundred and fifty pounds at something around $4.00 a pound. Since we moved from the mainland we haven't had a big enough freezer so we usually bought just a whole loin. I will talk to this guy in the next week or two and let you know if he is still in the business........Right now he is in the Caribbean getting a tan or whatever.

Okay dockay, and info for my daughter re: lamb too, thanks
so much.
 
countryboy
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsleView Post

I realize this is an old post but I thought I would respond anyway. I was speaking with some people about peppers. We sell a lot of serrano peppers - much more than Jalapeno's. I haven't bought them yet myself but I intend to. People tell me that the serrano peppers are a little sweeter and more mild than the jalapeno's are. The price is right too. You can 2-3 or them for about 25 cents or less. They look just like a jalapeno except they are much smaller. Anyway, you might want to give them a try.

VanIsle - Here's a handy little chart on chiles peppers and their heat levels. Serrano chiles should be a bit hotter than jalapenos, but I think it depends on "the batch." Anyway, it's one version of the "Scoville Scale"...there are a few more kicking around. (I like the habaneros, but one has to be careful with them...)

Sweet Bells; Sweet Banana; and Pimento0Negligible Scoville UnitsMexi-Bells; Cherry; New Mexica; New Mexico; Anaheim; Big Jim 100-1,000 Scoville Units

Ancho; Pasilla; Espanola; Anaheim 1,000 - 1,500 Scoville Units

Sandia; Cascabel 1,500 - 2,500 Scoville Units

Jalapeno; Mirasol; Chipotle; Poblano 2,500 - 5,000 Scoville Units

Yellow Wax; Serrano 5,000 - 15,000 Scoville Units

Chile De Arbol 15,000 - 30,000 Scoville Units

Aji; Cayenne; Tabasco; Piquin 30,000 - 50,000 Scoville Units

Santaka; Chiltecpin; Thai 50,000 - 100,000 Scoville Units

Habanero; Scotch Bonnet 100,000 - 350,000 Scoville Units

Red Savina Habanero; Indian Tezpur 350,000-855,000 Scoville Units
 
#juan
#35
100,000 Scoville units will take the paint off your car. God knows what 855,000 Scoville units might do to your insides.
 
countryboy
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

100,000 Scoville units will take the paint off your car. God knows what 855,000 Scoville units might do to your insides.

Yeah, that figure is a bit extreme, eh? Actually, the capsicum in chilies is pretty healthy stuff - I eat habaneros all the time (well over 100,000 S/units), and have for many years. Mind you, I don't eat a bowl of raw ones every day...yikes! But, using them in conjunction with other ingredients to get the benefit of their unique flavour can be fun. And tasty too!

For a rather mild salsa, I always use serrano chilies but I roast and skin them first...and then scrape off some of the white "veiny stuff" if my guests don't like stuff too hot. The white stuff is where the extreme heat resides.
 
VanIsle
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

VanIsle - Here's a handy little chart on chiles peppers and their heat levels. Serrano chiles should be a bit hotter than jalapenos, but I think it depends on "the batch." Anyway, it's one version of the "Scoville Scale"...there are a few more kicking around. (I like the habaneros, but one has to be careful with them...)

Sweet Bells; Sweet Banana; and Pimento0Negligible Scoville UnitsMexi-Bells; Cherry; New Mexica; New Mexico; Anaheim; Big Jim 100-1,000 Scoville Units

Ancho; Pasilla; Espanola; Anaheim 1,000 - 1,500 Scoville Units

Sandia; Cascabel 1,500 - 2,500 Scoville Units

Jalapeno; Mirasol; Chipotle; Poblano 2,500 - 5,000 Scoville Units

Yellow Wax; Serrano 5,000 - 15,000 Scoville Units

Chile De Arbol 15,000 - 30,000 Scoville Units

Aji; Cayenne; Tabasco; Piquin 30,000 - 50,000 Scoville Units

Santaka; Chiltecpin; Thai 50,000 - 100,000 Scoville Units

Habanero; Scotch Bonnet 100,000 - 350,000 Scoville Units

Red Savina Habanero; Indian Tezpur 350,000-855,000 Scoville Units

Thank you. It's a great list but where is the Anaheim and the Poblano (sp?)? People ask me all the time about which one is the hottest. and the best I can do is tell them what I have been told. If my printer was connected (hasn't been since we moved in at the end of October!) I would print this off for reference.
 
countryboy
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsleView Post

Thank you. It's a great list but where is the Anaheim and the Poblano (sp?)? People ask me all the time about which one is the hottest. and the best I can do is tell them what I have been told. If my printer was connected (hasn't been since we moved in at the end of October!) I would print this off for reference.

Hi VI...I did a poor job of copying and pasting this list...you can probably find a much better one by Googling "Scoville Unit chart" or something like that. The one I put isn't too clear but the 2 chilies you asked about are there...here we go again:

Sweet Bells; Sweet Banana; and Pimento0Negligible Scoville UnitsMexi-Bells; Cherry; New Mexica; New Mexico; Anaheim; Big Jim 100-1,000 Scoville Units

Ancho; Pasilla; Espanola; Anaheim 1,000 - 1,500 Scoville Units

Sandia; Cascabel 1,500 - 2,500 Scoville Units

Jalapeno; Mirasol; Chipotle; Poblano 2,500 - 5,000 Scoville Units

Yellow Wax; Serrano 5,000 - 15,000 Scoville Units

Chile De Arbol 15,000 - 30,000 Scoville Units

Aji; Cayenne; Tabasco; Piquin 30,000 - 50,000 Scoville Units

Santaka; Chiltecpin; Thai 50,000 - 100,000 Scoville Units

Habanero; Scotch Bonnet 100,000 - 350,000 Scoville Units

Red Savina Habanero; Indian Tezpur 350,000-855,000 Scoville Units

I see this one lists Anaheim twice, could be due to an overlap in the rating...it could be right on 1,000 units so shows in both categories above. Or, it could just be a mistake...

I believe an Ancho is a dried Poblano chilie and that would make some sense, as the white veiny stuff would shrink, thus leaving the dried version (Ancho) with less bite than the fresh version (Poblano). At least, that's my opinion.

These charts are just a bit of a guideline as I've seen slightly different numbers on different charts, but it is kind of handy for those interested in such things. Like me!
 
VanIsle
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

Hi VI...I did a poor job of copying and pasting this list...you can probably find a much better one by Googling "Scoville Unit chart" or something like that. The one I put isn't too clear but the 2 chilies you asked about are there...here we go again:

Sweet Bells; Sweet Banana; and Pimento0Negligible Scoville UnitsMexi-Bells; Cherry; New Mexica; New Mexico; Anaheim; Big Jim 100-1,000 Scoville Units

Ancho; Pasilla; Espanola; Anaheim 1,000 - 1,500 Scoville Units

Sandia; Cascabel 1,500 - 2,500 Scoville Units

Jalapeno; Mirasol; Chipotle; Poblano 2,500 - 5,000 Scoville Units

Yellow Wax; Serrano 5,000 - 15,000 Scoville Units

Chile De Arbol 15,000 - 30,000 Scoville Units

Aji; Cayenne; Tabasco; Piquin 30,000 - 50,000 Scoville Units

Santaka; Chiltecpin; Thai 50,000 - 100,000 Scoville Units

Habanero; Scotch Bonnet 100,000 - 350,000 Scoville Units

Red Savina Habanero; Indian Tezpur 350,000-855,000 Scoville Units

I see this one lists Anaheim twice, could be due to an overlap in the rating...it could be right on 1,000 units so shows in both categories above. Or, it could just be a mistake...

I believe an Ancho is a dried Poblano chilie and that would make some sense, as the white veiny stuff would shrink, thus leaving the dried version (Ancho) with less bite than the fresh version (Poblano). At least, that's my opinion.

These charts are just a bit of a guideline as I've seen slightly different numbers on different charts, but it is kind of handy for those interested in such things. Like me!

Thank you again. Lots of people are interested. It would be wise for all stores to post such a list so people can gauge the heat. I get told so many recipes in a day. I have an excellent memory but - for the number of people I am in contact with in a day who want to tell me how they prepare their food, memory doesn't begin to hold. I tell them how wonderful it sounds and I am being sincere. I just don't remember what they've said by the time I'm finished with the next customer. What amazes me most is that people choose odd fruits and veggies and then when they get to me (and the other cashiers) we say "what is this called" to which they say "I don't know. I thought you would know"! If ya don't know what it is or how to use it, why would you buy it??? I actually never knew that people would buy and eat celery root! I had a fellow in his mid 20's packing for me today. He's been with the store for about 6 years. When someone came through with a celery root and I just put it through, he said - What IS that? I was finished with it so I let the customer tell him all about it. He sounded about as interested as I felt. Now I'll probably have 10 people come on here and tell me how wonderful and healthy it is. I'm still never going to use it.
 
#juan
#40
Celery root is not the root of the celery we usually slice up into soups or salads. Celery root is kind of like a turnip. It is a different kind of celery. The stocks can be tough and bitter.

Last edited by #juan; Jan 24th, 2010 at 05:32 PM..
 
VanIsle
#41
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Celery root is not the root of the celery we usually slice up into soups or salads. Celery root is kind of like a turnip. It is a different kind of celery. The stocks can be tough and bitter.

You captured a great picture but it doesn't sell with all the "greenery". The dirt is still on it and it doesn't look like anything I would ever want to buy. I don't even like to touch them.
Really good Baron of Beef on this week for a great price. We had one for dinner tonight. Very tender meat. 11 of us sat down to dinner and everyone loved it. (dinner by hubby tonight and it was even ready when I got home from work).
 
karrie
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsleView Post

If ya don't know what it is or how to use it, why would you buy it???

lol... I do that all the time! We try to make sure we try something new from the stores about once a week. How else do you ever learn how to cook with new things? Once i get home I research it, find out what to do with it, etc., and then whip up something. It hasn't failed us too many times thank goodness... we've gotten some pretty yummy meals out of my adventures. lol.
 
#juan
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsleView Post

You captured a great picture but it doesn't sell with all the "greenery". The dirt is still on it and it doesn't look like anything I would ever want to buy. I don't even like to touch them.
Really good Baron of Beef on this week for a great price. We had one for dinner tonight. Very tender meat. 11 of us sat down to dinner and everyone loved it. (dinner by hubby tonight and it was even ready when I got home from work).

That one definitely doesn't look very appetizing. We've bought at least two or three in the last few years. It's not a veggie that is easy to like. A lot of peeling to do. You can cook them and mash them like potatoes or grate them raw into a salad or whatever.
The baron of beef sounds good. I wish S.O.F. would turn out a good calabrese bread roll to use for a beef dip. Their Calabrese bread is second to none.
 
El Barto
#44
My ex had a recipie she liked , don't know how that taste like tho, but it involved whip cream and me
 
countryboy
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by El BartoView Post

My ex had a recipie she liked , don't know how that taste like tho, but it involved whip cream and me

Is that the one called "Afternoon Delight?"
 
El Barto
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

Is that the one called "Afternoon Delight?"

dunno, but her sweet tooth was my delight hahahahaha
 
#juan
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by El BartoView Post

dunno, but her sweet tooth was my delight hahahahaha

Try to stay on topic guys.
 
countryboy
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Try to stay on topic guys.

Good point, Juan...sorry about that!

I took a (grass-fed) beef shoulder roast the other night and poked it with a boning knife, and then inserted pieces of cut up garlic into the incisions. I then used a small food blender (Magic Bullet) to liquefy more garlic, onions, salt, and some serrano chilies into sort of a "cream." I basted the roast on all side with it, and then slow roasted it for around 4 hours.

I'm a garlic lover (does it show?), but the slow roasting removed any "objectionable" odours and turned the whole thing into a rich tasting, falling-apart tender beef experience. I think cheap cuts of beef have more and better flavour than the expensive cuts, but it's a bit of a challenge to get them into a chewable, edible state. Got lucky on this one!
 
#juan
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

Good point, Juan...sorry about that!

I took a (grass-fed) beef shoulder roast the other night and poked it with a boning knife, and then inserted pieces of cut up garlic into the incisions. I then used a small food blender (Magic Bullet) to liquefy more garlic, onions, salt, and some serrano chilies into sort of a "cream." I basted the roast on all side with it, and then slow roasted it for around 4 hours.

I'm a garlic lover (does it show?), but the slow roasting removed any "objectionable" odours and turned the whole thing into a rich tasting, falling-apart tender beef experience. I think cheap cuts of beef have more and better flavour than the expensive cuts, but it's a bit of a challenge to get them into a chewable, edible state. Got lucky on this one!

The so-called better cuts of beef don't take kindly to slow cooking. You need a well marbled cut with a bit of fat like the shoulder you used or a crossrib roast., Otherwise it will often be stringy.
 
Risus
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

Good point, Juan...sorry about that!

I took a (grass-fed) beef shoulder roast the other night and poked it with a boning knife, and then inserted pieces of cut up garlic into the incisions. I then used a small food blender (Magic Bullet) to liquefy more garlic, onions, salt, and some serrano chilies into sort of a "cream." I basted the roast on all side with it, and then slow roasted it for around 4 hours.

I'm a garlic lover (does it show?), but the slow roasting removed any "objectionable" odours and turned the whole thing into a rich tasting, falling-apart tender beef experience. I think cheap cuts of beef have more and better flavour than the expensive cuts, but it's a bit of a challenge to get them into a chewable, edible state. Got lucky on this one!

I hope you had good hot horseradish with it!
 
countryboy
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by RisusView Post

I hope you had good hot horseradish with it!

I did! I mixed it with some of my homemade (hot) mustard and it was pretty good. Would like to find some fresh horseradish but hard to do around here. A neighbor grew some a couple of years ago, and gave it to me as she didn't know what to do with it. I ground it up, added some things to it, and boy was it ever good...fresh tasting. Good for clearing the sinuses.
 
karrie
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

I did! I mixed it with some of my homemade (hot) mustard and it was pretty good. Would like to find some fresh horseradish but hard to do around here. A neighbor grew some a couple of years ago, and gave it to me as she didn't know what to do with it. I ground it up, added some things to it, and boy was it ever good...fresh tasting. Good for clearing the sinuses.

Around easter you should be able to find some fresh root in the markets. Buy it, plant it... you'll never be without that way. Just make sure to plant it somewhere out of the way. It's a pretty hardy 'weed'.
 
countryboy
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Around easter you should be able to find some fresh root in the markets. Buy it, plant it... you'll never be without that way. Just make sure to plant it somewhere out of the way. It's a pretty hardy 'weed'.

If it's "weed-like", it will likely do quite well around here! Sounds like it's a perennial, right? Thanks for that, Karrie...
 
karrie
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

If it's "weed-like", it will likely do quite well around here! Sounds like it's a perennial, right? Thanks for that, Karrie...

countryboy, you probably have tons of it around you already, and just don't know what to look for. I know a ton of ditches around here I could go dig horseradish out of, and it even grew where we lived north of the 58th. It is perennial indeed.
 
countryboy
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

countryboy, you probably have tons of it around you already, and just don't know what to look for. I know a ton of ditches around here I could go dig horseradish out of, and it even grew where we lived north of the 58th. It is perennial indeed.

You're probably right...I can't remember what it looks like "above ground." But, I have a couple of green-thumbed neighbours who could help me out on that. Growing in ditches?!? Wow! That would be a find...

I really love the taste of fresh horseradish vs. the ready-to-go stuff in the stores. It's quite "alive" and easy to grind up into a nice concoction...

Thanks again!
 
karrie
#56


Horseradish is a lot like rhubarb.... try to get rid of it and you just make it multiply. So, ditches tend to end up with tons of it, because if grind up one root with your equipment, you spread it like wildfire.
Last edited by karrie; Jan 25th, 2010 at 08:04 PM..
 
countryboy
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post



Horseradish is a lot like rhubarb.... try to get rid of it and you just make it multiply. So, ditches tend to end up with tons of it, because if grind up one root with your equipment, you spread it like wildfire.

Jeez, if that happens I'll be in "weed heaven." I already have some rhubarb growing here and there, so I'm all set there (for rhubarb and strawberry pies, for one thing)...Also have mint on the grow in a couple of places. I just let it grow...got 15 acres with "natural patches" strategically placed (the ones I don't touch), so that might be where the horseradish will go/grow. Mmm...weeds you can eat - too good!
 
karrie
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboyView Post

Jeez, if that happens I'll be in "weed heaven." I already have some rhubarb growing here and there, so I'm all set there (for rhubarb and strawberry pies, for one thing)...Also have mint on the grow in a couple of places. I just let it grow...got 15 acres with "natural patches" strategically placed (the ones I don't touch), so that might be where the horseradish will go/grow. Mmm...weeds you can eat - too good!

If you've got some perennial spots set up for yourself you might also want to consider chives and thyme. Asparagus is also a great perennial to have from what I hear (I have yet to grow it myself).
 
countryboy
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

If you've got some perennial spots set up for yourself you might also want to consider chives and thyme. Asparagus is also a great perennial to have from what I hear (I have yet to grow it myself).

Thank you...yes, already have an herb garden going...indoors and out, when seasons allow. I have a neighbour who grows huge amounts of asparagus - really nice stuff - so I'll continue to "raid her garden" for that one. It's really nice to eat when it's less than an hour out of the garden...flavour!

She and her hubby went on a cross-Canada tour last summer and left me in charge of eating the garden's bounty...oh boy, it was a great summer...fresh raspberries, tons of strawberries, lots of asparagus (every day!), varieties of greens, and much more.

It all went well with the grass-fed beef (staying on topic here) that I already had in stock.
 
Risus
#60
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Around easter you should be able to find some fresh root in the markets. Buy it, plant it... you'll never be without that way. Just make sure to plant it somewhere out of the way. It's a pretty hardy 'weed'.

I'll have to keep an eye open for it!
 

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