The French Don’t Learn Quickly.


Blackleaf
#1
How long will it take the French to adapt to globalization, with its increasing opportunities for the skilled and flexible?

A clue: During the Little Ice Age, it took them literally 500 years to recognize that the Earth’s climate had shifted.



The French Don’t Learn Quickly
By Dennis Avery (04/13/2006)

Recently, TV news channels have featured vivid pictures from France. First, The French Muslim youth rioted and burned cars because their unemployment runs close to 50 percent. Then, French students counter-rioted, against liberalizing French labor laws designed to guarantee the old General Motors-style “jobs for life” for a lucky few.

The truth of the story is that the welfare mentality in France helped prevent the creation of a single additional French private-sector job in the past 30 years.

How long will it take the French to adapt to globalization, with its increasing opportunities for the skilled and flexible?

A clue: During the Little Ice Age, it took them literally 500 years to recognize that the Earth’s climate had shifted.

France suffered more than 100 famines in the 500 years after the Medieval Warming ended in 1300 AD. Ultimately, the famines set the stage for the French Revolution in 1789.

Under the stress of a colder climate, the Dutch and English launched farming revolutions after 1600 that doubled farm yields and banished famines. The French refused to change, despite two more centuries of colder, wetter growing seasons that ruined their main food crops—wheat and rye—with heavy rain, cloudy skies, and early frosts.

The Medieval Warming, which lasted from 950 to 1300, had been a fabulous period for farming. Higher temperatures, sunshine and longer growing seasons fed human populations that increases by 50 percent.

Then, after 1300, came another of the sudden climate shifts that occur on Earth about every 1500 years, according to the ice cores and pollen fossils. The world suddenly turned cold, stormy and unstable. Late, wet springs and cloudy skies became the new norm across Europe. Grain crops too often didn’t ripen, or were killed by early frosts.

The Dutch responded with windmills that reclaimed huge tracts of highly productive low-lying “polder” land from the sea.

The British turned to crop rotation. They’d been letting half their cropland lie fallow and unplanted in alternate years to rebuild fertility. Now they fenced or hedged their fields and communal pastures, and rotated crops and livestock on the same land. The manure from the cattle and sheep fertilized the succeeding grains.

An Englishman invented the mechanical seed drill about 1700, which produced far higher grain yields than strewing seeds on the ground.


Potatoes, introduced from South America, yielded far more food per acre than grains—especially the low-yielding oats of the marginal farmers. Potatoes spread across Europe as animal feed, then as food for the poor because potatoes and milk provided better nutrition than bread.

But seeders, potatoes, and crop rotation did not spread in France. French farmlands were mainly owned by absent noblemen. Its illiterate peasants remained committed to bread, even when the wet crop years provided only damp, moldy grain.

The ergot fungus flourished in the wet years, especially in the cheap rye ground for peasant bread. The mold often produced mass hysteria. Bread riots were common. In particularly cold periods, hundreds of women were burned as witches whom the peasants were sure had cursed their crops.

By 1700, England had ample food for 7 million people, far more than the 5 million it fed during the Medieval Warming and double the 3 million left by the famines and bubonic plague of the early Little Ice Age.

The Little Ice Age was almost over (1850) by the time France got over its famines, revolutions, and Napoleon’s grandiose dreams of world conquest.

Unfortunately, the French aren’t winning much in the Modern Warming either.

americandaily.com . . .
-------------------------------------------------------------------

EU's average IQ league of the Big 5 -

Germany - 107
Italy - 102
Britain - 100
Spain - 98
France - 94

thetimesonline.co.uk
 
aeon
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

How long will it take the French to adapt to globalization, with its increasing opportunities for the skilled and flexible?

A clue: During the Little Ice Age, it took them literally 500 years to recognize that the Earth’s climate had shifted.



The French Don’t Learn Quickly
By Dennis Avery (04/13/2006)

Recently, TV news channels have featured vivid pictures from France. First, The French Muslim youth rioted and burned cars because their unemployment runs close to 50 percent. Then, French students counter-rioted, against liberalizing French labor laws designed to guarantee the old General Motors-style “jobs for life” for a lucky few.

The truth of the story is that the welfare mentality in France helped prevent the creation of a single additional French private-sector job in the past 30 years.

How long will it take the French to adapt to globalization, with its increasing opportunities for the skilled and flexible?

A clue: During the Little Ice Age, it took them literally 500 years to recognize that the Earth’s climate had shifted.

France suffered more than 100 famines in the 500 years after the Medieval Warming ended in 1300 AD. Ultimately, the famines set the stage for the French Revolution in 1789.

Under the stress of a colder climate, the Dutch and English launched farming revolutions after 1600 that doubled farm yields and banished famines. The French refused to change, despite two more centuries of colder, wetter growing seasons that ruined their main food crops—wheat and rye—with heavy rain, cloudy skies, and early frosts.

The Medieval Warming, which lasted from 950 to 1300, had been a fabulous period for farming. Higher temperatures, sunshine and longer growing seasons fed human populations that increases by 50 percent.

Then, after 1300, came another of the sudden climate shifts that occur on Earth about every 1500 years, according to the ice cores and pollen fossils. The world suddenly turned cold, stormy and unstable. Late, wet springs and cloudy skies became the new norm across Europe. Grain crops too often didn’t ripen, or were killed by early frosts.

The Dutch responded with windmills that reclaimed huge tracts of highly productive low-lying “polder” land from the sea.

The British turned to crop rotation. They’d been letting half their cropland lie fallow and unplanted in alternate years to rebuild fertility. Now they fenced or hedged their fields and communal pastures, and rotated crops and livestock on the same land. The manure from the cattle and sheep fertilized the succeeding grains.

An Englishman invented the mechanical seed drill about 1700, which produced far higher grain yields than strewing seeds on the ground.


Potatoes, introduced from South America, yielded far more food per acre than grains—especially the low-yielding oats of the marginal farmers. Potatoes spread across Europe as animal feed, then as food for the poor because potatoes and milk provided better nutrition than bread.

But seeders, potatoes, and crop rotation did not spread in France. French farmlands were mainly owned by absent noblemen. Its illiterate peasants remained committed to bread, even when the wet crop years provided only damp, moldy grain.

The ergot fungus flourished in the wet years, especially in the cheap rye ground for peasant bread. The mold often produced mass hysteria. Bread riots were common. In particularly cold periods, hundreds of women were burned as witches whom the peasants were sure had cursed their crops.

By 1700, England had ample food for 7 million people, far more than the 5 million it fed during the Medieval Warming and double the 3 million left by the famines and bubonic plague of the early Little Ice Age.

The Little Ice Age was almost over (1850) by the time France got over its famines, revolutions, and Napoleon’s grandiose dreams of world conquest.

Unfortunately, the French aren’t winning much in the Modern Warming either.

americandaily.com . . .
-------------------------------------------------------------------

EU's average IQ league of the Big 5 -

Germany - 107
Italy - 102
Britain - 100
Spain - 98
France - 94

thetimesonline.co.uk






IQ from 85 to 115, is considered as normal, 145 and up is considered as smarter than people in general, 175 and up are considered as genius.


Considering that iQ test is quite biased, it means absotly nothing.
 
Alberta'sfinest
#3
It just sounds like you're racist to me. Lots of leaders have made bad decisions that have screwed over their countries.

Globalization isn't the best of ideas for many reasons. I don't support it because it's sole purpose is to remove economic controls so that the exploitation of the working class and poorer nations can be steamlined to benefit the wealthy elite.
 
Jersay
#4
I have to agree with aeon and Alberta'Finest, you are just plainly racist against the French people. The British have screwed up way more than the British.

And from your IQ test, the average British person isn't any smarter.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
#5
French don't learn?

Considering that they voted for Chirac's UMP (Conservative) Party and that his policy has made a mess of France, I'd say you are correct!
 
Jersay
#6
Hey Germans and Italians are smarted than the British. That must throw a wrench within British belief that they are somehow the best.
 
I think not
#7
So a passport determines if an individual has the ability to learn quickly or not. Fascinating.

Great thread Blackleaf, I think you have outdone yourself this time.
 
Alberta'sfinest
#8
I don't think it matters which country you look at, their all full of average people. It's those who are above average that move everything foreward, and these peoples whereabouts are pure coincidence as every country has them. You also look at everything the wrong way. See, I live in Alberta and everyone is gung ho PC because they paid down the debt. The reality is that hard working Albertans and a blossoming oil industry paid down the debt, and the government in place at the time is rather unimportant and only got credit because they just happened to be in charge. The same thing happens when ****ty events go on during a certain party's leadership. They get the blame even if they have done everything right just because they were in charge.
If you ask me, the current french situation is much the same as many other parts of the world that have more people than jobs to give them. There economy is suffering because of the situation, not how it's being dealt with, although it is in the dealing with the situation that determines the extent of the problem.
 
Semperfi_dani
#9
Question: Does ANY question learn from its mistakes?
 
Semperfi_dani
#10
Question: Does ANY country learn from its mistakes?
 
zoofer
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Semperfi_dani

Question: Does ANY country learn from its mistakes?

You don't have to repeat the question Dani. I'm not that dense.

Now what was the question again? :P
 
Canadian with a hyphen
#12
I spoke French as a first a language . after that, i spoke english and Italian and it wasn't hard at all .

I guess it all boils down to wether u want to learn or not,
if u think english speakers are arrogant or if u think since ur french that ur better than anyone , u will NEVER learn another language and the language barrier will keep u isolated forever...

Rachelle_
 

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