World's most advanced warship is launched on the Clyde.


Blackleaf
#1
This is one of many ships to be entering service in the Royal Navy over the next few years.

Britain is undergoing its largest programme of building warships since World War II.

New warship is 'quantum leap forward' for the Navy
By Thomas Harding, Defence Correspondent
(Filed: 02/02/2006)

The most powerful frontline warship since the Second World War was launched by the Countess of Wessex yesterday, marking a resurgence of British naval ship building.


The first Type 45 destroyer is launched yesterday. It will not be fully fitted out until 2009.

The first of Britain's new Type 45 destroyers took to the waters of the Clyde as the world's most advanced air defence ship.

Daring will be able to track and destroy a target the size of a cricket ball travelling at more than three times the speed of sound, a "quantum leap forward in the Navy's capabilities", according the Royal Navy.

The boat's defensive system, combining a hugely powerful radar and missile system, has left American visitors to the yard "shaken and shocked", according to BAE Systems, its builders.

The destroyer's launch was watched by a crowd of 11,000 and hundreds of Daring's Glaswegian shipbuilders.

In the next 10 years, as many as eight T45s could be built at a cost of Ģ650 million each. Also to be commissioned are two large aircraft carriers (Ģ3.5 billion), four Astute class hunter killer submarines (Ģ3 billion) and a fleet of up to 14 auxiliary ships (Ģ3.5 billion).

Daring will be fitted with its radar and missile systems before its sea trials in early 2007. Its Samson radar, from its current location in Portsmouth, can monitor all take offs and landings from every major European airport.


telegraph.co.uk
 
thulin
#2
How about the Visby class corvette and Gotland class submarine produced by Kockums?

A Gotland class sub is actually rented by US Navy (crew included!) during one year (stationed in San Diego). The yanks needed training to spott the vessel (since they didnīt during the Partnership for peace training i the Baltic).

www.kockums.se (external - login to view)


Submarine, Gotland class (in San Dieago)


Corvette, Visby class


Corvette, Visby class


Quote: Originally Posted by Kockums

(2001-12-07) Visby corvette puts to sea for first time
Engineering trials have started
The Visby corvette, the Swedish Navys next-generation surface vessel, has put to sea on her maiden voyage. This signifies the start of engineering trials under Kockums supervision. Visby put to sea for the first time this morning, and initial trials have proved highly satisfactory. It should be noted that these trials are engineering trials. They are focused on fine-tuning the engines, steering and control systems etc., prior to embarking on more advanced sea trials.
?We are of course very pleased that Visby is now at sea for the first time. The Swedish Navys next-generation surface vessel, the Visby corvette constitutes a complete stealth concept and is an extremely important contract for Kockums. In collaboration with our German owner, the HDW Group, we are now also engaged in developing an export version, comments Hans Hedman, president of Kockums.
The Visby-class corvette, which is the first naval vessel to feature fully developed stealth technology, is built in carbon fibre. This makes her extremely difficult to detect, even when using the most modern and sophisticated radar and IR-sensor systems.
The Visby corvettes combination of multi-mission flexibility and advanced stealth technology at every level makes her a true vessel of the future. The introduction of stealth technology is now forcing a global...

Quote has been trimmed
Sorry for editing like an idiot, the pictures wouldīnt go my way...
 
Blackleaf
#3
Nope. Our Type 45 is the world's most advanced.
 
thulin
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Daring will be fitted with its radar and missile systems before its sea trials in early 2007

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Nope. Our Type 45 is the world's most advanced.

Is or will be? Seems like the later, if itīs even true to start with. Iīm no engineer so I donīt have a clue, really.
 
Ten Packs
#5
Does this mean we'll be buying some leaky old 1956 P.O.S., with a dent in the hull?
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote:

A Gotland class sub is actually rented by US Navy (crew included!) during one year (stationed in San Diego). The yanks needed training to spott the vessel (since they didnīt during the Partnership for peace training i the Baltic).

Us Brits also have new technology that enables us to see stealth aircraft and stealth warships and it'll soon render America's stealth aircraft and Sweden's stealth warship obsolete. It's ANOTHER piece of new British military technology that have the Yanks feeling a bit nervous.
 
Blackleaf
#7
Quote:

Is or will be? Seems like the later, if itīs even true to start with. Iīm no engineer so I donīt have a clue, really.

Well, they don't come into service until 2009 - there'll be 8 of them altogether.

The radar (another British invention) is the most powerful in the world and can spot an object the size of a cricket ball or tennis ball moving at three times the speed of sound.

It's also the most luxurious warship ever built for the Royal Navy, with each cabin having connections to the internet and even its own bar.
 
Blackleaf
#8

That ship seems a bit bare, weapon-wise. Where are the guns and things? I wouldn't mind the Royal Navy fighting the Swedish Navy. It'd be a "doddle."



Eight Type 45 Daring Class destroyers will be built for the UK Royal Navy.





The spherical object on top is the Sampsom rader - the most powerful radar in the world. It can detect an object the size of a tennis ball travelling more than 3 times the speed of sound (an enemy would have to be very lucky to hit these ships with any missile.) The ships will be the most luxurious warships ever created - each cabin having access to the internet and each ship having its own bar.

The angles of the outer hull of each ship also make them difficult to spot on radar.



Also arriving in the future are new aircraft carriers, new submarines, 14 auxiliary ships and new generation nuclear weapons. Thanks to the installation of the world's most powerful laser at Aldermaston, Britain's nuke bomb factory, we can test nukes even though live testing has been banned as the laser mimics a nuclear explosion.
 
thulin
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

That ship seems a bit bare, weapon-wise. Where are the guns and things? I wouldn't mind the Royal Navy fighting the Swedish Navy. It'd be a "doddle."

All guns are built in into the hull in order to make that shape. It seems that is what makes the radar shadow fade.

The boat has 8 surface missiles (SAAB Robot 15), one Bofors 57 mm canon, torpedoes and anti-sub rockets.


Bofors 57 mm canon

Weapons specification (external - login to view)

Swedish navy is pretty much a "green water navy", and I donīt think anyone would kick their *** in the Baltic. Blue waters (ocean) is a completely different thing. Submarines seem to be an exeption though, since Singapore bought them and US want to train with them in the pacific.
 
Blackleaf
#10
I think the Royal Navy, the US Navy and the French navy (which is only half as powerful as the Royal Navy but number 2 in the EU) are the world's only Blue Water navies.

The RN is BY FAR the most powerful navy in Europe - it could take on any navy in Western Europe and win. It is twice as powerful as the French Navy, which is the second most powerful in Western Europe.

Apart from the US Navy, the only navy that comes close to the Royal Navy is Russia - which has, though, rusting warships. But with our 8 larger destroyers, our larger aircraft carriers (the largest warships in Europe) and the 14 other warships that we're building, the only navy on the planet that would surpass the Royal Navy in terms of firepower would be the US Navy. It's already no2 in the world for total tonnage. The RN would probably outgun the combined fleets of France and Germany by 2012.
 
Blackleaf
#11
This was written a few days before HMS Daring's launch -



The big ship Royal Navy is back
(Filed: 29/01/2006)


An old giant of the Royal Navy - the mighty HMS Dreadnought.
Now, the Royal Navy's destroyers and aircraft carriers are getting bigger again.

This week's launch of HMS Daring marks a new era in British warship construction. But will it last? Sylvia Pfeifer reports

Two workers in navy-blue overalls stand 15 ft above the ground in a cherry picker, busy smoothing out rough patches on the steel bow of a giant warship. On the decks above them, dozens of others crawl over the ship. Outside by the entrance to the cavernous hall, an electronic clock counts down next to the words "Days to launch".

In three days' time, weather permitting, the workers will launch the 153m ship into the Clyde. The official launch - which will be attended by 11,000 guests, including the Countess of Wessex - will mark a major milestone in the Ģ6bn programme to supply the Royal Navy with its first new class of warship for several years.

HMS Daring is the first of the new Type 45 destroyers and the largest vessel launched from BAE Systems' Scotstoun yard in Glasgow. But the launch is much more than just another photo opportunity for royal watchers.

In the yard's centenary year, and just over 200 years since the Battle of Trafalgar, Britain's shipbuilding industry is enjoying a revival, buoyed by the largest work programme in a generation. With the Royal Navy's two new aircraft carriers and the Astute submarines, the 7,350 tonne Type 45 destroyers will form the backbone of the Royal Navy's air defence for the first half of this century. The final piece of the jigsaw is Mars (short for Military Afloat Reach and Sustainability), a Ģ2bn-plus supply ship programme which is just at its formative stage. "It's the return of the big ship Navy," says one industry executive.

Vic Emery, the managing director of BAE's naval shipbuilding division, says talk of a revival is "true to some extent".

The company recruited 300 people last year to cope with the increased workload; it plans to hire the same number this year and a further 250 in 2007. Investment has also kept pace with the orders; since 2001 BAE has committed Ģ55m in capital expenditure to bring the Clyde yards up to speed for the warship programme. Emery proudly points out that the company has taken on 280 apprentices in the past three years as well as 50 graduates.

Ross McLure, the module hall manager at Scotstoun who started in the industry as an apprentice plater in 1976, says that much of the uncertainty that plagued the work force during the 1980s and 1990s, when redundancies took place nearly every two to three years, has gone.

"It's only in the past three to four years … that you can say there is continuity," he says on a walk around the ship. "We've never been able to look ahead for eight years even."

Having witnessed three "first of class" launches during the past three decades, McLure is adamant that the Type 45 is in a class of its own. In a new style of partnership with other contractors, the bow of the ship was built by VT Group, the support services and shipbuilding company, at its yard in Portsmouth and shipped to the Clyde where it was put together with the other blocks built at Scotstoun. The second and third ships in the eight-ship order are already being built at BAE's Govan yard on the other side of the river.

Apart from its impressive length, the ship boasts a radar mast that is as high as the Twin Towers of the old Wembley Stadium, a flight deck large enough for 20 London buses and a fitness centre for its mixed crew of 190. It is the first time a ship has been designed from the start to have women on board.

It is the first front-line warship to use all-electric propulsion and, when ready to go into service in 2009, will be equipped with the latest in warfare technology. Apart from a design that incorporates stealth technology, the Type 45 will have an anti-aircraft missile system, PAAMs, which is capable of taking out supersonic aircraft. Connecting it all, are 400 miles of cabling and 19,000 pipes.


Nevertheless, despite such superlatives and the industry's healthy signs, there are concerns that the renaissance could fizzle out. The original requirement from the Government for 12 Type 45s has already been scaled back to eight and the overall budget has been cut by Ģ145m following a decision to reduce the capabilities of the ships.

Much depends on whether the Government confirms an order for the final two vessels. According to Emery, unless BAE and its partners get approval to build two more Type 45s, it could lead to a gap in workload until the next big project starts in earnest, that to build the aircraft carriers.

Emery says: "What we need to secure in terms of continuity of work are two more Type 45s. The ministry have said they will buy up to eight but the budget is creaking. That would secure that there would be no gap at all."

Paul Lester, the chief executive of VT Group, is equally blunt. "Type 45 is the first in a series of projects that will sustain the industry for a period of some 15 years and gives us the opportunity to plan the long-term future. The programme has allowed us to recruit and train new skilled personnel in preparation for further projects, notably the future aircraft carriers. However, it is vitally important that ships seven and eight are ordered so that we do not suffer any break in production through to the aircraft carriers and therefore avoid the risk of losing those skills," he says.

Emery says he expects to hear more from the MoD by the summer, and declares himself "optimistic". "I believe it's really an affordability issue. There is no doubt the end-user wants eight."

Above all, what executives are striving for is a long-term strategy for an industry that has been dominated by peaks and troughs. A new maritime strategy, unveiled by Lord Drayson, the defence procurement minister, in December, has gone some way towards assuaging concerns.

At the heart of the review is a move to build a strategic partnership between industry and government to help safeguard future warship building capability. The alliance building the naval carriers is also expected to form the blueprint for a wider grouping of naval shipbuilding firms that could lead to the formation of a new national champion in warship construction, dubbed "ShipCo".

Emery says "the initial flush of the review is positive", pointing out that he has been calling for a more of a partnership with the Ministry of Defence for three years. Nevertheless, as always, "the devil is in the detail".

"We need to understand what the intention is. We want a single entity. Anything other than that … and you don't get the economic benefits," he says.

But any thoughts about the best way to ensure the industry's long-term future will be no doubt be at the back of his mind on Wednesday when the HMS Daring takes to the water for the first time. "I can't wait," says Emery. "To get the first one in the water is a great event. I will be elated."

telegraph.co.uk
 
Blackleaf
#12
Britain is back! After decades with no shipbuilding, an industry in which we were once the world leaders at, warships are starting to be churned out of British factories once more.
 
Blackleaf
#13
Royal Navy's new carriers -





Other future ships -





Future submarines -



A submarine attacking an enemy.


----------------------------

The Royal Navy is continually looking at ways to improve its technology. This Concept by BAE systems is just one that the navy is looking into.


Directional Waterjet Propulsion Pods
Ultra-Quiet directable podded water jet propulsion units rotate at the root to provide vectored directional thrust and unparalled high/low speed manoeuvrability in conjunction with single lower rudder for stability and steering.



Sensor Arrays
Ultra-Sophisticated all-round sonar coverage achieved through platypus bow sonar and after fin arrays.
 
Finder
#14
not a bad next gen ship.

I'm suprised the UK already has one. At this rate Canada should have one in 50 years or so.
 
thulin
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

I think the Royal Navy, the US Navy and the French navy (which is only half as powerful as the Royal Navy but number 2 in the EU) are the world's only Blue Water navies

How about Russia, Japan, India, Australia, China and South Africa?
 
aeon
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

This is one of many ships to be entering service in the Royal Navy over the next few years.

Britain is undergoing its largest programme of building warships since World War II.

wow i am impress, so much money for this , incredible.
 
thulin
#17
Yup, that last post showed some really cool stuff!
 
Saaywhu
#18
I want to start this to say Im sorry for my carppy english, and sorry if some of the terms get mixed up and wrong in translation

I can honestly say the I respekt the English(Britsh) Navy, been in NATO sea training with them called FOST and JMC, unlike there American counterpart this guy know how to truly rule the seas. All modern internal fight ( E.g fire, and water filling) more or less for all navys in the world is based upon what the Brits learnt in the Falklands.

And what you guys say about the type 45 ( Seen one IRL at a dock in Scottland btw) vs stealth is pretty much true but you miss a few vital points. Todays sea warfare is not based upon who got the biggest radar or gun, but who will detect who first. Big radar = big radar imition and all warships today even down to small corvetts carry a passiv raidar, this by it self is meningless but in pair they can be used trinagulate a enemies position. And secondly a raidar how big it gets can never ever by it self see over the "Radar horizon". And todays sea warfare weapons systems aint that much based on gun as much as Cruise missiles. Guns is alway lasy way out in open warfare. So the Visby system with its 3P 57mm gun is more then enough. The yanks are even planing on putting it on there large vessels.
And to truly understand the ide behind the Visby corvett you must understand how little sweden was planing on deffening it self against mother russia in the lats years of the cold war/ or other countries for that matter. Visby aint intended for open sea warfare, it's soul mission is ( Think it's called this in English) Litteral warfare, deffend and attack targets close to the coast and to reach things that the bigger vessels just can't get to cause of there size.
Big size in the modern warfare at seas bring more or less only one advantage ( A big one none the less) and it's endurance, endurance and some more. Type 45 will be able to be at seas for week/mounth maybe even a year. A Visby for exampel will be able for 2-3 weeks at a sea pull then the crew will be drained and the supplise out.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#19
Too bad someone doesn't make a anti-war ship. I think stupidity is the force that drives people into developing more efficient and better ways of killing people; especially if these devices are never used for said purpose.
 
china
Conservative
#20
Yes,throughout the ages any new design or discovery was always used in building some kind of offensive weapon ;pity .
 
EagleSmack
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

Us Brits also have new technology that enables us to see stealth aircraft and stealth warships and it'll soon render America's stealth aircraft and Sweden's stealth warship obsolete. It's ANOTHER piece of new British military technology that have the Yanks feeling a bit nervous.

A bit nervous? As if you are going to use it on us? Give me a break... it is a destroyer... a surface vessel. If it floats on the water it can be found and will be sunk. The Type 45 would make a nice corral reef somewhere.
 

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