Ukip closing in on victory


Locutus
+1
#1  Top Rated Post
  • Opinium poll has Ukip on 32 per cent, with Labour trailing on 25 per cent
  • Tories on 21 per cent, with Lib Dems and Greens a distant fourth and fifth
  • Farage says a Ukip triumph will be a 'political earthquake' for Britain


UKIP are on course for an unprecedented victory in today’s European Parliament elections - despite Nigel Farage admitting he is ‘frazzled’ and cannot go on being the party’s dominant face.

An Opinium poll for the Daily Mail puts Ukip comfortably ahead of Labour, on 32 per cent to 25 per cent.

The Conservatives are on 21 per cent, with the Liberal Democrats battling the Greens for fourth place, each on a miserable 6 per cent.

Both Labour and the Conservatives appear reconciled to Ukip coming out on top, despite weeks of controversy over allegations of racism, homophobia and misogyny against the upstart party’s candidates.

David Cameron is ordering Tory troops to focus on a Westminster by-election in Newark early next month as an opportunity to halt the Ukip bandwagon.

Conservative strategists point to a sharp decline in Mr Farage’s personal ratings in recent weeks and compare him to a ‘shock jock’ radio host whose outbursts will not convince voters at a general election.


more


Ukip closing in on EU election victory as poll puts Nigel Farage ahead | Mail Online
 
Blackleaf
#2
It's EU elections today in the UK (in most of the rest of the EU they are over the weekend so the results won't be in until Sunday night) and also in the UK it's local council elections in England and Northern Ireland. So I've just been to the local polling station at St William of York RC Primary School (or St William or Pork as I've called it since I was 11 in 1993 due to the fact the fancy Y on the sign looks like a P) and I voted for UKIP in both elections.

The big three lefty liberal Establishment parties - Tories (they've been infiltrated by liberals), LibDems and Labour - are running scared of UKIP and have spent weeks smearing them, and so have the Establishment press - as "racists" and "sexists" or some or other "phobes" (the usual tags that liberals put on people who disagree with them). Every day in newspapers we hear of a new "racism allegation" against some UKIP councillor ("he said this about Muslims", "Farage has said people wouldn't want Romanians living next door to them" blah blah blah), yet any such "offences" that are bound to have been committed by any Labour, Tory or LibDem member is ignored.

But these smears aren't working. No matter what the Establishment have been smearing UKIP with, calling them "racists", "sexists", or "homophobes", they still keep pulling ahead in the polls and they will still win in the UK in the EU elections. The British public don't seem bothered by the smears.

If UKIP do win the EU elections it'll be the first time ever that a British political party has won an election without it having a single MP.


Here are some of Yookip's policies which, if they get to implement them (maybe in a CONKIP coalition from 2015?!?!), will make Britain a better, fairer place:



What We Stand For



These are anxious and troubled times. As crisis follows crisis, our politicians do nothing in the face of dangers rearing up all around us.

Taxes and Government debt rise. Energy and transport costs soar. Unemployment is too high. The NHS and state education strain under a population increase of 4 million since 2001.

Another wave of uncontrolled immigration comes from the EU (this time Bulgaria and Romania). Yet the political class tells us the EU is good for the UK.

A gulf has opened between the ruling elite and the public. Because they must all follow Brussels diktats, each of the establishment main parties is now so similar voters have no real choice.

The EU controls Immigration, Business and Employment, Financial Services, Fishing, Farming, Energy and Trade. It seeks now to control Law and Order, Foreign Affairs and Tax. Only outside the EU can we start to solve the problems our country faces.


Return Power to the UK



• A vote for UKIP is a vote to leave the EU and recover power over our national life.

• Free trade, but not political union, with our European neighbours. We are the EU’s largest export market: they depend on us for jobs - not the other way around.

• Binding local and national referenda, at the public’s request, on major issues.



Protect Our Borders



• Regain control of our borders and of immigration - only possible by leaving the EU.

• Immigrants must financially support themselves and their dependents for 5 years. This means private health insurance (except emergency medical care), private education and private housing - they should pay into the pot before they take out of it.

• A points-based visa system and time-limited work permits.

• Proof of private health insurance must be a precondition for immigrants and tourists to enter the UK.


Rebuild Prosperity



• Save £55m a day in membership fees by leaving the EU and give British workers first crack at the 800,000 jobs we currently advertise to EU workers.

• No tax on the minimum wage.

• Enrol unemployed welfare claimants onto community schemes or retraining workfare programmes.

• Scrap HS2, all green taxes and wind turbine subsidies.

• Develop shale gas to reduce energy bills and free us from dependence on foreign oil and gas - place the tax revenues into a British Sovereign Wealth Fund.

• UKIP will abolish inheritance tax. Inheritance tax brings in under £4bn - less than a third of what we spend on foreign aid. The super-rich avoid it, while modest property owners get caught by it. It hits people during a time of grief and UKIP will budget in its 2015 spending plans to completely abolish this unfair death tax.

• Make cuts to foreign aid that are real and rigorous.



Safeguard Against Crime



• No cuts to front line policing.

• Make sentences mean what they say.

• No votes for prisoners - that’s what losing your liberty means.

• Prevent foreign criminals entering the UK - by re-introducing border controls that the EU forced us to abandon.

• Scrap the European Arrest Warrant, which sends British citizens to foreign jails without evidence, just to answer questions - replace it with a proper extradition system.

• Remove the UK from the jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights.


Care And Support For All



• Open GP surgeries in the evening, for full-time workers, where there is demand.

• Locally-elected County Health Boards to inspect hospitals - to avoid another Stafford Hospital crisis.

• Prioritise social housing for people whose parents and grandparents were born locally.

• Allow the creation of new grammar schools.

• Make welfare a safety net for the needy, not a bed for the lazy. Benefits only available to those who have lived here for over 5 years.


Free Speech and Democracy




• No to Political Correctness - it stifles free speech.

• The law of the land must apply to us all. We oppose any other system of law.

• Teach children positive messages and pride in their country. We want to unite through better integration.

UKIP is a patriotic party that believes in putting Britain first. Only UKIP will return self-government to the British people.

Issues - UKIP
Last edited by Blackleaf; May 22nd, 2014 at 06:42 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#3
'The Ukip fox is in the Westminster henhouse'

Ukip are celebrating after trouncing their rivals in the local elections in England.

Ukip now have 102 seats so far - a massive increase of 101 - with many councils still to declare their results. So it's likely they will get yet more seats. In fact, only 79 of the 161 English councils taking part in the elections have declared their results. However, Ukip's seats are so thinly spread they have not gained control of any councils.

And, experts say that had this been a general election, Ukip would have won their first seat in the Commons.

The elections have been held for all 32 London boroughs, all 36 metropolitan boroughs, 74 second-tier district authorities, 20 unitary authorities and various mayoral posts, all in England. It isn't the whole of England which has held local elections but, still, large swathes of it still went to the polls. Almost half - 1,800 - of all the council seats up for grabs in England are in London.

Elections to the new councils in Northern Ireland have also been held (Northern Ireland has different political parties to the rest of the UK).

Around 46 million people have been eligible to vote.

Ukip gains cost the Tories control of Basildon, Castle Point and Southend while a surge in Essex saw Mr Farage's party erode the Labour grip in Thurrock - a key Westminster target for Ed Miliband's party.

In the north, Ukip showed it could pose a threat to Labour in its strongholds, taking 10 of the 21 council seats up for election in Rotherham, including nine gains, and polling an average of 47 per cent where its candidates stood. Ukip will especially be proud of their result in Rotherham because it is the town where, a year ago, the council - rather disturbingly - took a baby off its foster carers because they were Ukip supporters!

The Lib Dems lost control of Portsmouth after Ukip won six seats, including defeating under-fire Lib Dem MP Mike Hancock who was standing for re-election to the council.

Ukip don't seem to be doing as well in London, a more left-wing and ethnically diverse area of the country, though they have still gained council seats in some of the city's 32 boroughs.

Speaking to reporters outside his home this morning, Mr Farage said: 'There are areas of the country where now we have got an imprint in local government.

Under the first-past-the-post system we are serious players.'

A surge in support for Ukip has cost all the mainstream parties seats and control of councils, as Nigel Farage's People's Army marches into town halls across the country.

The Tories, Labour and Lib Dems all saw their grip on local authorities eroded as dozens of seats fell to Ukip in local elections in England.

After 66 councils had declared results, Ukip had gained 91 seats, with the Tories losing 118 and Labour gaining 132.

Bolton, my hometown, now has two Ukip councillors, after previously having none, although the town remains under Labour control.

A jubilant Mr Farage declared: 'The Ukip fox is in the Westminster hen house.'

Clegg and Miliband after his party takes council seats from Tories in the south and Labour heartlands in the north

Tories in South and Labour in Midlands and North suffer as Ukip win seats

Labour makes gains in London but falls short of expectations elsewhere

Conservatives lose Hammersmith and Fulham to Labour in shock result

Tories also lose control of Essex councils as Ukip deny them majorities

Lib Dems lose Portsmouth and Tories rob them of Kingston-upon-Thames

Nick Clegg refuses to resign as Labour MPs round on Ed Miliband
European election results will not be announced until Sunday night

By Matt Chorley, Mailonline Political Editor and Tom Mctague, Mail Online Deputy Political Editor
Daly Mail
23 May 2014

Results so far in England (just the Big Four parties)

Councils

Labour: 49 (+5)
Conservatives: 25 (-9)
Liberal Democrats: 2 (-2)
Ukip: 0 (0)


Councillors

Labour: 999 (+168 )
Conservatives: 783 (-134)
Liberal Democrats: 268 (-151)
Ukip: 102 (+101)

79 of 161 councils have so far declared their results


A surge in support for Ukip has cost all the mainstream parties seats and control of councils, as Nigel Farage's People's Army marches into town halls across the country.

The Tories, Labour and Lib Dems all saw their grip on local authorities eroded as dozens of seats fell to Ukip in local elections in England.

After 66 councils had declared results, Ukip had gained 91 seats, with the Tories losing 118 and Labour gaining 132.

A jubilant Mr Farage declared: 'The Ukip fox is in the Westminster hen house.'

Ukip leader Nigel Farage clutches a bottle of wine as he is mobbed by supporters and the media as he met new councillors in South Ockendon

Cheers! After a gruelling election campaign, Mr Farage savers a pint in a pub in Benfleet

By midday, with 66 councils having declared results, Ukip had gained 91 council seats

Of the first 66 councils to declare, Labour is in control of 37 councils, up four, while the Tories have lost eight councils, leaving them in control of 21

Ukip gains cost the Tories control of Basildon, Castle Point and Southend while a surge in Essex saw Mr Farage's party erode the Labour grip in Thurrock - a key Westminster target for Ed Miliband's party.

In the north, Ukip showed it could pose a threat to Labour in its strongholds, taking 10 of the 21 council seats up for election in Rotherham, including nine gains, and polling an average of 47 per cent where its candidates stood.

The Lib Dems lost control of Portsmouth after Ukip won six seats, including defeating under-fire Lib Dem MP Mike Hancock who was standing for re-election to the council.

Speaking to reporters outside his home this morning, Mr Farage said: 'There are areas of the country where now we have got an imprint in local government.

Under the first-past-the-post system we are serious players.'

Tory leader David Cameron ruled out an election pact with Ukip, insisting his party had to do more to persuade voters they were delivering for Britain

Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg refused to resign after losing flagship councils, while Labour leader Ed Miliband faced fresh criticism of his leadership style

HOW THE UKIP FACTOR ROBBED RIVALS OF COUNCIL CONTROL


Ukip might not have won any councils themselves, but a surge in support robbed the other parties of overall control of town halls across the country.

Ukip gains cost the Tories control in Maidstone, Basildon, Peterborough, Castle Point and Southend-on-Sea.

Similarly, Labour lost control of Thurrock and Lib Dems were ousted from Portsmouth after Ukip won seats.

BIGGEST UKIP WINS (Ukip did well in Essex):
Basildon 11 seats
Portsmouth 6 seats
Thurrock 5 seats
Southend 5 seats
Castlepoint 5 seats
Maidstone 4 seats


Mr Farage suggested that the idea that Ukip had only damaged the Tory vote had been blown away by the results.

'There were two conversations going on last night. One was in Westminster amongst commentariat and MPs... The other conversation was going on in Swindon where the Labour leader said: "We've been hurt by Ukip",' he told the BBC.

'Another conversation was going in Rotherham where Ukip won 10 seats and Labour won 11 seats.

'In the West Midlands Labour were saying 'Ukip are splitting our vote and letting the Tories in'. And I think this idea that the UKIP vote just hurts the Tories I think is going to be blown away by these results.'

All the main parties have been left reeling about how to respond to the Ukip threat, with just a year to go until the general election.

Labour leader Ed Miliband, under pressure for failing to make major gains with a year until the general election said voters turned to Ukip out of a 'deep sense of discontent' with the way the country is being run.

He insisted he can 'persuade' Ukip backers to support him in the battle for Number 10 in May next year.

He told Sky News: 'I think in some parts of the country we've had discontent building up for decades about the way the country has been run and about the way our economy works and people feeling that the country just doesn't work for them.

'And so what you are seeing in some parts of the country is people turning to Ukip as an expression of that discontent and that desire for change.'

Early indications suggested Ukip appeared to be struggling to make progress in London, where the big battles were between Labour and the Tories.

In a boost for Mr Miliband, Labour ousted the Tories from Hammersmith and Fulham, a flagship authority in the capital.

Labour also gained the key target London borough of Croydon from the Conservatives. Labour gained seven seats, while the Tories lost seven seats.

Tory party chairman Grant Shapps was forced to rule out a pact with Ukip at the general election to stem the loss of support.

More than 4,000 council seats were up for grabs, including the London boroughs and those in Northern Ireland.

Votes were also cast throughout the UK for the European Parliament contest to return 73 MEPs - but those results will not be announced until Sunday night.


Ukip supporters celebrate big national gains as they wait for leader Nigel Farage to arrive in South Ockenden

Frances Fox celebrates becoming Ukip's first councillor elected in Peterborough

The count at Trinity School in the London Borough of Croydon seemed to be too much for some

LABOUR KICK TORIES OUT OF HAMMERSMITH AND FULHAM

Labour hailed a 'spectacular' victory in Hammersmith and Fulham, taking control of the flagship Tory council.

Eleven Conservative seats in the Tory stronghold went to Labour - leaving the council with 26 Labour seats and 20 Conservative.

The borough, sometimes described as David Cameron's favourite, has been under Conservative control since 2002.

Ed Miliband's party also won overall control of the south London borough of Merton, gaining eight seats.

The party also made gains in Hastings, Carlisle, Cannock Chase, Dudley and Ipswich.

Labour also took Cambridge from no overall control, taking seats off the Liberal Democrats.

The Tories lost overall control of Maidstone in Kent, after Ukip took four seats and Labour gained one.

The Conservatives also saw the grip on Peterbroough eroded, losing three seats to Ukip and one to Labour, and narrlowly clung on in Tamworth after Ukip took one seat.

The Tories also lost Brentwood, in the backyard of Communities Secretary Eric Pickles. They lost two seats to the Lib Dems and one to Labour, which means that no party has a majority.

The Conservatives also lost control in Southend-on-Sea after a Ukip surge saw them gain five seats.

Ukip took five seats in Castle Point, denying the Tories of another overall majority.

Ukip showed signs of making major gains elsewhere in Essex, traditionally a key Labour-Tory battleground which can decide general elections.

Margaret Thatcher identified the 'Essex man' when prime minister as someone who previously would have been expected to vote Labour but backed her leadership thanks to polices targeted to appeal to them.

In Basildon, Ukip gained 11 seats - becoming the second largest party and costing the Tories control of the council.

Mr Farage's party gained seven seats from the Conservatives, two from Labour and one each from the Lib Dems and an independent.

In Thurrock - a key swing seat in the Commons - Ukip gained five seats, meaning that Labour lost control of the council.








Updated results so far in England (just the Big Four parties)

Councils

Labour: 58 (+5)
Conservatives: 27 (-10)
Liberal Democrats: 5 (-2)
Ukip: 0 (0)


Councillors

Labour: 1147 (+181)
Conservatives: 881 (-156)
Liberal Democrats: 316 (-169)
Ukip: 124 (+122)

After 94 of 161 councils
Last edited by Blackleaf; May 23rd, 2014 at 09:18 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#4
The chancellor says he respects Nigel Farage but the UKIP leader does not have "answers to the country's future" - although it seems many members of the public disagree with the chancellor.

George Osborne told the BBC the Conservatives had to listen to the "anger and anxiety" of those who voted for UKIP in Thursday's local elections.

In England UKIP gained 161 council seats, and now have 163 in total, whilst in Northern Ireland they gained three council seats, but Mr Osborne said the general election would be a choice between Labour and the Tories.

Whilst that may be true for the 2015 general election, I suspect it won't be in the too distant future when Ukip WILL be a major force in general elections.

It is now recognised that England has now become, as Scotland and Wales have been for years, a country with four main political parties.

The BBC's projected national share of the vote suggests UKIP would have scored 17% in a country-wide election. Labour would have got 31% of the vote, just two points ahead of the Conservatives on 29% with the Liberal Democrats on 13%.

Now we just wait for the results of the EU elections, which come in tomorrow night, in which Ukip are expected to win in the UK.


I respect Nigel Farage, says George Osborne

BBC News
24 May 2014

)


Council elections in England (Top four)

Councils

Labour: 82 (+6)
Conservatives: 41 (-11)
Liberal Democrats: 6 (-2)
Ukip: 0 (0)


Councillors

Labour: 2101 (+338 )
Conservatives: 1359 (-231)
Liberal Democrats 427 (-307)
Ukip: 163 (+161)

After 159 of 161 councils


Northern Ireland council elections (top seven)

Democratic Unionist Party: 79 seats; 127,378 votes
Ulster Unionist Party: 63 seats; 87,101 votes
Sinn Féin: 60 seats; 121,531 votes
Social Democratic and Labour Party: 37 seats; 68,076 votes
Alliance Party: 18 seats; 35,114 votes
Traditional Unionist Voice: 9 seats; 24,025 votes
Ukip: 3 seats; 8213 votes

The chancellor says he respects Nigel Farage but the UKIP leader does not have "answers to the country's future".

George Osborne told the BBC the Conservatives had to listen to the "anger and anxiety" of those who voted for UKIP in Thursday's local elections.

UKIP gained 161 seats but Mr Osborne said the general election would be a choice between Labour and the Tories.

Labour, which gained more than 300 councillors, has defended its campaign amid some criticism from its own ranks.



Millions of voters took part in local elections in England and Northern Ireland, while European elections were held across the UK.



  • With 160 of 161 English councils declared, Labour has gained 338 seats, the Lib Dems have lost 307 and the Conservatives have lost 231
  • Eight formerly Conservative councils have gone to no overall control, some following UKIP gains
  • Labour is set for its best performance in London since 1998. It took Hammersmith and Fulham, Croydon and Crawley from the Conservatives - as well as Amber Valley in Derbyshire
  • But Labour lost Thurrock, North East Lincolnshire and Great Yarmouth to no overall control after UKIP gained seats on each council
  • Despite UKIP's strong performance, it still does not control a single council and its projected national share of the vote is down on 2012
  • The Lib Dems lost Kingston-upon-Thames to the Conservatives and Portsmouth to no overall control
  • Turnout looks to have been about 36%
  • Results from the European election will not be known until late Sunday
  • Counting in Northern Ireland's local elections is continuing
  • You can follow full coverage with all the latest updates at bbc.co.uk/vote2014
The BBC's projected national share of the vote suggests UKIP would have scored 17% in a country-wide election. Labour would have got 31% of the vote, just two points ahead of the Conservatives on 29% with the Liberal Democrats on 13%.

UKIP's projected national share figure is lower than the 23% it got in council elections last year.

But, amid fears that the Conservatives could lose Westminster seats because of supporters defecting to UKIP, some Tory MPs have suggested a pact between the Conservatives and UKIP at the next general election. Prime Minister David Cameron has rejected the idea.

On BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Mr Osborne said: "The choice at the election is do you want Ed Miliband and the Labour Party in Downing Street, or do you want David Cameron and the Conservatives in government?"

He added: "We take very seriously the fact that people have voted UKIP. We respect that fact. We have to listen to people who voted UKIP. We have to listen to their anger and their anxiety."

'Good progress'

Pressed on whether his respect for UKIP voters extended to Mr Farage, the chancellor said: "I respect Nigel Farage and the other leaders of Britain's political parties, but it doesn't mean that I agree with him. I don't think he has the answers to the country's future."

He also promised that his party would work "incredibly hard" to win an outright parliamentary majority in 2015.

Labour leader Ed Miliband has also faced criticism for his party's performance on Thursday, as it lost some seats to UKIP, despite gaining control of 11 councils,

Michael Dugher, shadow minister for the Cabinet Office, said Labour was making "extremely good progress" but that its members were "not complacent".

He told the BBC: "I'm pleased that we won in those key battleground seats.

"I'm realistic but I'm also aware that, in some of or heartland areas, we did lose seats to UKIP and that is an area where we're going to have to work much harder."

As the results came in on Friday, Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg identified a "very strong anti-politics feeling" among voters.

He urged activists to highlight Lib Dem policies like the "pupil premium" and increases to the threshold below which people pay no income tax.

Mr Farage hailed the results as proof that his candidates would be "serious players" in 2015's general election, in with a chance of winning representation in the UK Parliament for the first time.

The "UKIP fox is in the Westminster hen house", he said.

BBC News - I respect Nigel Farage, says George Osborne
















Last edited by Blackleaf; May 24th, 2014 at 06:26 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#5
Ukip ("Yookip") is the 20-year-old, right-wing political party which is shaking up British politics.

Becoming seemingly evermore popular amongst British voters by the day, it is the only one of Britain's four biggest political parties whose membership is growing.

Ukip's loony lefty liberal opponents try to paint Ukip members as mustard trousers, swivel eyes and foaming mouth, ranting furiously about the European Union, socialism, ‘lib-tards’ and so on.

However, that is far from the truth...


The most shocking thing about young Ukip supporters: they’re normal

I went expecting to find mustard trousers. I found down-to-earth ex-Labour voters

24 May 2014
Sebastian Payne
The Spectator


Michael Heaver and Jack Duffin at Ukip HQ. Photo: Sebastian Payne for The Spectator.

Close your eyes and imagine a young Ukip voter. Let me guess: mustard trousers, swivel eyes and foaming mouth, ranting furiously about the European Union, socialism, ‘lib-tards’ and so on.

Now meet Dayle Taylor, a young Ukipper working at McDonald’s in Accrington. He’s no fruitloop, just a typical modern student who grills Big Macs to pay his way through university and feels that none of the major parties speak for him. What distinguishes him from your average British youth is a lack of apathy about politics. ‘I’m always encouraging Ukippers at McDonald’s,’ he says, ‘and I build up a rapport with the regulars who say they haven’t voted before but will lend their support to Ukip on 22 May.’

Like many of Ukip’s newest recruits, Dayle comes from a working-class Labour family. He was firmly on their side as a boy, until he came to the conclusion that Labour had ‘deserted their core voters’. He turned to Ukip and has never looked back. He’s now a regional chairman of Young Independence, the party’s youth wing. Young Independence was founded seven years ago and is growing fast: it has some 2,000 members and 20 university branches. It represents about 5 per cent of Ukip’s overall membership.

At the party’s annual conference in 2007, a dozen young Kippers were thrown out of the conference and barred from a Telford hotel for drunkenness. Ukip apparently leaked the story because, according to one party source, ‘No one would believe we had young members.’ At last year’s conference hundreds of under-25s turned up to listen, cheer and grin for the TV cameras.

Young Ukippers tend to be more libertarian than their older brethren, and more libertine. Olly Neville, the second chair of YI, was thrown out of Ukip for being supportive of gay marriage (at odds with party policy) and asking in an article ‘What is wrong with necrophilia?’ Sean Howlett, one of the party’s rising stars, was caught by a Sunday Mirror exposé proclaiming he had been to Essex ‘twice in my life, twice too many’.


Dayle Taylor (right) campaigning for Ukip in Chester

I asked Harry Aldridge, who founded Young Independence ten years ago, what first attracted him and his fellow young Kippers to join the party. ‘I felt national politics was a bit stale. Everyone was arguing over minor details and there are no big ideas anymore. The radical idealism of younger people draws them towards Ukip,’ he says.

According to YouGov, 13 per cent of those intending to vote Ukip at the European elections are aged 18 to 24 — two percentage points more than for the Green party. Jack Duffin, a 22-year-old student at Brunel University, is the current chair of Young Independence and recently stood to be Ukip’s first representative in the National Union of Students. At one time, Jack was a young Tory activist, but he lost the faith. His sticking point is not Cameron’s support for the same-sex marriage act, but Tony Blair’s higher education reforms.

‘The 50 per cent target [for university] destroyed everything,’ he says. ‘Apprenticeships dried up because so many people were told you’ve now got to go to university.’ As YI chair he is trying to head an awareness campaign for those under-25s left behind by the Tories, Labour and Lib Dems.

Michael Heaver, a 24-year-old candidate for the European Parliament, is another example of a no-nonsense young Kipper. Like Jack, he blames Labour for deserting his generation. ‘Labour have abandoned normal working-class people who have seen what’s been done [to Britain] particularly since Blair. For a lot of the young people, that was a major wake-up call.’

These young Ukip campaigners are probably the most normal, diverse and energetic youngsters I’ve encountered in politics. Some are caught up in the excitement and momentum that Ukip has generated in the past few years; others are now committed to the party, in it for the long haul. Unless the political parties can find an answer to these youthful ‘left-behinds’, the young Kippers are here to stay.
Sebastian Payne is online editor of The Spectator.



This article first appeared in the print edition of The Spectator magazine, dated 24 May 2014

The most shocking thing about young Ukip supporters: they’re normal » The Spectator


I’ve had it with the insufferable London elite. Have you?

Rod Liddle
22 May 2014
The Spectator


Photo: Getty Images

‘I’ve had it with these people. They are so smug; they think they know everything and they know nothing. They want a good kick in the face.’

So said a close friend of mine, more usually a Labour voter, before she went out to vote for Ukip earlier today. I think it was the Jasmine Lawrence thing which tipped her over the edge. Jasmine is, improbably enough, the boss of the BBC’s News Channel. She had ‘tweeted’ that Ukip was a sexist and racist party - yesterday.

Of course, she should be sacked. Right now. The BBC’s News Channel is supposedly impartial – that’s what we pay for, an impartial service. Either that or the BBC should accept that all of its employees possess political views and there is no problem in having them aired. But it will not sign up to that more enlightened position because it knows that 90 per cent of them are as smug, and stupid, and bien pensant as Jasmine.

But it wasn’t just Jasmine, it was a whole bunch of other stuff too. The splenetic fury which the London elite sprays, mindlessly, upon those who do not agree with its views. I’ve had it with these people too, to tell you the truth.

http://www.politicsforum.co.uk/forum...708582#p708582
 
Locutus
#6


 
Blackleaf
#7

Nigel Farage today declared that his 'dream has become a reality' after UKIP stormed to victory in the UK section of the EU elections, paving the way for a bid to secure a 'good number' of MPs in the Commons.

With 11 of the 12 EU regions of the UK declared, UKIP has won more than 27 per cent of the vote, electing 24 MEPs, leaving Labour and the Tories to battle it out for second for the first time in 100 years.

It is the first time since 1906 that neither Labour nor the Tories have won a UK election.

Mr Farage said he was 'over the moon' and predicted that Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg could be forced to quit after losing 11 of his 12 MEPs, despite pitching the Lib Dems as a the 'party of in'.

With just Northern Ireland still to declare, Ukip have 24 MEPs - up 11 - Labour have 20, Conservatives have 19 and the pro-EU LibDems lost TEN seats, and now have just ONE. Greens have three, SNP have two and Plaid Cymru have one.

One suprising result of the night is that Ukip have gained one MEP in Scotland, and is the first time they have representation there. That is thought to be a massive blow to the independence campaign and the idea that the Scots are somehow more pro-EU than the English.

The EU region in which Ukip performed best was the South East, in which they have FOUR MEPs.

In my region, the North West, UKIP now have three MEPs, up two.

It was a night in which anti-EU parties did well across the EU in the EU elections. Marie le Pen's anti-EU Front National won in France.

'My dream has become a reality': Jubilant Farage cannot contain his glee at triumph over the main parties


Tories, Labour and Lib Dems face fresh turmoil as results are announced

After 11 regions declared, UKIP has 24 MEPs and 29% of the vote
up 11.68%
Labour had 18 MEPs and 25.35% vote share, the Tories 18 MEPs and 24.56%

BNP lost its only remaining seat in Brussels as Griffin concedes defeat

Turnout across 28 EU members states estimated at 41.3%


By Matt Chorley, Mailonline Political Editor
25 May 2014

Nigel Farage today declared that his 'dream has become a reality' after UKIP stormed to victory in the European elections, paving the way for a bid to secure a 'good number' of MPs in the Commons.

With 11 regions declared, UKIP has won more than 27 per cent of the vote, electing 24 MEPs, leaving Labour and the Tories to battle it out for second for the first time in 100 years.

Mr Farage said he was 'over the moon' and predicted that Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg could be forced to quit after losing 11 of his 12 MEPs, despite pitching the Lib Dems as a the 'party of in'.

But former Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair warned Britain should be 'worried' about the rise of UKIP based on fuelling 'anti-immigrant feeling'.


Ukip leader Nigel Farage, at the South East count in Southampton, hailed his party's victory as the most extraordinary result in British politics for 100 years



Mr Farage wore pound sign socks as he set of to central London for a victory rally to celebrate winning more than 27 per cent of the vote





With only Northern Ireland left to declare, UKIP has 24 MEPs, up 11 since 2009, including its first MEP in Scotland.,

Labour has 20 seats and the Tories 19 seats in Brussels, with Labour narrowly ahead on vote share - 25.4 per cent to 23.93 per cent.

Support for Ukip has surged by more than 12 per cent, outstripping a more modest boost in votes for Labour, while the Lib Dems faced near-wipeout, slipping into fifth place behind the Greens.

Mr Farage said he was 'proud' of the campaign which has seen him humiliate the Westminster parties, pushing Labour and the Tories into second and third.

On a dramatic political night:

  • The Lib Dems clung on to just one MEP - in the South East - as it faced wipeout elsewhere
  • Labour only narrowly beat the Tories after failing to make progress in key areas where they must win at the general election
  • The BNP lost its place in Brussels, as leader Nick Griffin conceded defeat
  • David Cameron rejected local electoral deals with Ukip at next year’s general election, as he dismissed Mr Farage's image as a 'normal bloke down the pub'
  • Mr Farage hailed the first election triumph for a minor party in more than 100 years
  • Across Europe, far-right and Eurosceptic parties swept to victory in many countries




As Ukip was triumphing in the UK, across the Channel France’s far-right National Front was on course for a massive victory in European elections tonight as the country swung behind its anti-immigration, anti-EU agenda.

UKIP appears to have eaten into the support of all the main parties, although the Tory vote seems to be more resilient in some areas, down only four per cent before London and Scotland were declared.

Mr Farage said: 'Never before in the history of British politics has a party that will be seen to be an insurgent party ever topped the polls in a national election.

'We go on surprising people. I am delighted with the way the campaign has gone. It has been a pretty remarkable journey.

'We have formed the people's army to fight the establishment. I love Europe, it's the European Union I have a problem with.'

Confirmed as an MEP in the South East region, Mr Farage added: 'This is just about the most extraordinary result in British politics in 100 years.'










AFTER BRUSSELS, FARAGE SAYS HE WANTS A 'GOOD NUMBER' OF MPS


UKIP could secure a 'good number of MPs in Westminster after its success in the Euro vote, Nigel Farage predicted.

With his eyes firmly on next week's Westminster by-election at Newark - which last night's results suggest is now eminently winnable - the UKIP leader dismissed suggestions that the party had peaked and would struggle to repeat its successes in next year's general election.

'Everyone keeps saying it's the high tide mark for UKIP. I think the party has got real momentum behind it,' Mr Farage told the BBC.

Ukip will spend the summer developing a strategy to target efforts on Westminster seats where it has strong council representation, he said, adding: 'The plan is to get a good number of UKIP MPs elected next year.'



UKIP's victory in the polls is the first time a national election had not been won by either the Tories or Labour party since 1906, and raise doubts about either party’s hopes of securing an overall majority next year.

Labour strategists had been clinging to the hope that their party could yet edge victory, with some polls having narrowed in the closing stages of the campaign.

But the Tories pushed Mr Miliband's party into third before the London result was announced.

No opposition has gone on to win a general election has failed to top the European Parliament polls.

'My dream has become a reality,' Mr Farage told the BBC. 'The British people have stood firm, they have backed Ukip and we have won a national election. I'm over the moon.'

While jubilant UKIP celebrated its stunning victory, the Lib Dems were plunged into fresh turmoil with Mr Clegg clinging to his job.

His high stakes gamble to take on Mr Farage in two head-to-head TV debates has dramatically backfired.


Ahead of the results being announced, Mr Farage spent the day at the cricket, watching the County Championship Division Two match between Kent and Worcestershire at The Nevill Ground in Tonbridge Wells



Mr Farage sits with Janice Atkinson (left) and Diane James (right) before they were all confirmed as MEPs for the South East



UKIP have been celebrating across the country after gaining an extra 10 MEPs from 10 regions



Support for Nigel Farage's Ukip has surged by more than 12 per cent, outstripping a more modest boost in votes for Labour, while the Lib Dems faced near-wipeout, with some calling for Nick Clegg to resign









Pitching the Lib Dems as the true voice of pro-EU politics in Britain, Mr Clegg saw his MEPs wiped out in almost every region in the country.

The Lib Dems won 11 MEPs in 2009, and gained another through a defection.

But just Catherine Bearder held her seat in the South East, making her the only Lib Dem in Brussels when they previously had 12. Lib Dem grandee Sir Graham Watson also lost his seat in the South West, with the Green party taking his place.

''It has been a pretty awful night for the Liberal Democrats'

Mr Clegg’s position now looks precarious, after around 250 Lib Dems – including candidates and ex-MPs – signed a letter calling for him to resign.

But ahead of tonight’s results the party leadership told its members to prepare to lose most – if not – all of their seats.

In the popular share of the vote the Lib Dems slumped to just 6.87 per cent, barely half what it achieved in 2009.

Lib Dem president Tim Farron said the results were 'as bad as I feared' as it faced losing all of its MEPS.

Treasury minister Danny Alexander added: 'It has been a pretty awful night for the Liberal Democrats.'
Last edited by Blackleaf; May 26th, 2014 at 09:26 AM..
 
DaSleeper
#8
*****
 
petros
+1
#9
Who won?

Napoleon Dynamite?

 
BornRuff
#10
How long do you think it will take them to go the way of The Bloc Quebecois and decide that their love of their cushy government jobs outweighs their desire to take down the system from the inside.
 
Blackleaf
#11
Ukip are now looking to become a Westminster party for the first time by getting their first-ever MP when they compete in the Newark by-election on June 5th.

During his victory speech in London yesterday, Ukip leader Nigel Farage, who stood in front of his 24 new MEPs, said his party now plans to target working class areas in Northern England, including Labour leader Ed Miliband's constituency of Doncaster, where Farage plans to unveil his party's new manifesto.


Meanwhile, they have been called "racists".......... by none other than BNP leader Nick Griffin!! Griffin's far-right party lost their only EUSSR MEP (who represented the North West of England) in the EUSSR elections.


Come on Ukip! Turn the country purple!

My People's Army is on the march: First, Farage aims to take Newark from Tories... then it's the Labour heartlands


Ukip leader used victory speech to declare: 'You ain't seen nothing yet'
He will unveil General Election manifesto in Ed Miliband's constituency
It has been seen as a clear move to target working-class Labour voters
Mr Farage said other party leaders were like 'goldfish gasping for air'

By James Chapman, Political Editor
27 May 2014
Daily Mail


Nigel Farage warned Labour yesterday that Ukip will target its seats in northern, working-class areas – including Ed Miliband’s own constituency.

In a speech to mark his party’s victory in the European elections, Mr Farage told the main parties his success was just the start, declaring: ‘You ain’t seen nothing yet.’

The Ukip leader said he planned to do ‘everything he could’ to seize the Tory safe seat of Newark in the upcoming by-election on June 5.

Jubilant: The Ukip leader, seen here celebrating with his customary pint at the Westminster Arms, said he planned to do 'everything he could' to seize the Tory safe seat of Newark

Beaming: Ukip leader Nigel Farage, pictured yesterday with his 24 new MEPs, revealed how he will go after Labour and the Tories

And he said he planned to unveil his manifesto later this year in the Labour leader’s own Doncaster constituency – a clear indication that he will target the party’s working-class voters, many of whom have become disillusioned with Mr Miliband’s leadership.

He also listed potential general election targets, including Great Grimsby and Boston in Lincolnshire, Folkestone and Thanet in Kent, Portsmouth, Eastleigh, Plymouth, Aylesbury and parts of Cambridgeshire and Rotherham.

Speaking in central London yesterday, a triumphant Mr Farage said the main parties were ‘feeling the pressure’ after Ukip topped the poll in the European elections.

He said the three ‘legacy parties’ were ‘like goldfish that have just been tipped out of the bowl on to the floor, desperately gasping for air and clinging on to the comfort blanket that this is a protest vote’.

He added: ‘It is a remarkable result and I think it has profound consequences for the leaders of the other parties. Ukip, with the wind behind it, has got momentum.’

Insult: Mr Farage - seen here celebrating at the Westminster Arms - said the 'legacy parties' were 'like goldfish that have just been tipped out of the bowl on to the floor, desperately gasping for air and clinging on to the comfort blanket that this is a protest vote'

Asked whether his victory in the European Parliament elections was the result of a protest vote, Mr Farage said: ‘It’s beginning to look like a permanent protest.’

Turning his attention to the Newark by-election, he said: ‘The plan short-term for us is very simple.

‘The people’s army of Ukip now marches on Newark. We will do everything we can in the next ten days.


... AND HIS SOCKS HAVE DONE STERLING SERVICE!


They have become something of a good luck charm for the Ukip leader.

Nattily embroidered with purple pound signs, Nigel Farage’s blue socks have become a familiar sight on the campaign trail and at party conferences.

And yesterday, in the Ukip leader’s moment of electoral glory, the socks, top right, were pulled on once more before Mr Farage met ecstatic supporters for a victory rally in Westminster.

A jubilant Mr Farage also struck a humorous pose for the photographers with an empty pint glass on his head after enjoying his first beers of the day at the Westminster Arms.

‘We are going to do our damnedest to try to pull off an even more spectacular result.

'If we do that, I suspect David Cameron will also begin to feel some of the pressure.’

He added that his party had already ‘been doing substantial work’ on policy areas such as the NHS, defence, education and public spending.

He added: ‘We will unveil our outline manifesto for the next general election, and we will do it in a town called Doncaster.

‘It is a town in which Ed Miliband is the MP, it’s a town in which yesterday we topped the polls, and we will have an honest conversation with the British public about the cost-of-living crisis and about how we can make life better and more affordable for ordinary families in this country.’

Though most experts doubt the party can hope to win more than one or two MPs next year, Mr Farage achieved an extraordinary result by topping the European poll despite his party having no presence at all in the House of Commons.

He suggested Ukip would now aim to repeat the strategy of the Liberal Democrats in the 1980s and 1990s, when they steadily built up a Parliamentary presence after winning footholds in local elections.

GRIFFIN: UKIP ARE RACISTS


Nick Griffin in Manchester on Sunday night after he found out his party lost their EU parliament seat in the North West



The British National Party has blamed the rise of Ukip for its collapse in the European elections.

It said that people had voted for Nigel Farage’s party’s ‘racist policies instead’.

The BNP won two seats in 2009 but its vote collapsed in the face of the Ukip juggernaut.

In the North West, where leader Nick Griffin was elected five years ago, it won less than two per cent of the vote.

After the result was announced, Mr Griffin said Ukip supporters were ‘racists’ who would turn back to his party.










Sky News's EUSSR elections coverage from Sunday night, showing Nigel Farage's speech at the South East count in Southampton after he remained a Ukip MEP for the South East, and an interview with BNP leader Nick Griffin at the North West count in Manchester after his party lost its EUSSR seat:

EXCLUSIVE EU Elections Results 2014 UKIPs Wins Nigel Farage Victory Speech VIDEO - YouTube




BBC footage from yesterday on Farage's victory speech as he parades his 24 MEPs:

Nigel Farage immensely proud of UKIP election victory 2014 - YouTube

Nigel Farage is preparing to muscle into the battle against Scottish independence following his historic success in the European elections.

The UKIP leader wants to open a new front in the campaign against the SNP, to the horror of the established Better Together allies.


Mr Farage was yesterday basking in the glory of winning his first seat north of the Border in a major humiliation for Alex Salmond, who had pleaded with Scots to make a direct choice between the SNP and Ukip.

David Coburn, UKIP’s victorious candidate in Scotland, yesterday thanked the First Minister for polarising the debate, as Labour accused the SNP of foolishly delivering a boost for Mr Farage.

He told the Mail: 'With the election of David Coburn as the first UKIP MEP [in Scotland], we have not just put a fox into Westminster’s henhouse, we have put a pine marten into the Holyrood one.

'We are the only truly national political party, and the success of UKIP in Scotland in these elections proves that there is a voice for those who believe in an independent Scotland as part of the UK.

'Alex Salmond now finally has to deal honestly and openly with the key contradictions in his position – independence in Europe is no independence at all.'

Throughout the election campaign, the SNP attempted to persuade Scots there was a direct contest between the third candidate on their list, Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh, and Mr Coburn.

Ukip’s success now makes it much harder for Mr Salmond to argue that Scotland and England are ‘different countries’ as he bids to boost support ahead of the independence referendum in September.

'Now I'll stop Scotland splitting from the UK,' vows Farage as he says he will take on Alex Salmond over independence after Euro election triumph


UKIP leader claims he now leads the 'only national party' in Britain
Planning visits to Scotland ahead of September independence referendum
Party shocked pundits by winning an EU Parliament seat in Scotland

By Alan Roden

27 May 2014
Daily Mail



Nigel Farage is preparing to muscle into the battle against Scottish independence following his historic success in the European elections.

The UKIP leader wants to open a new front in the campaign against the SNP, to the horror of the established Better Together allies.

Mr Farage was yesterday basking in the glory of winning his first seat north of the Border in a major humiliation for Alex Salmond, who had pleaded with Scots to make a direct choice between the SNP and Ukip.

Nigel Farage wants to use his European election triumph as a springboard to stop Alex Salmond splitting Scotland off from the rest of the UK in September's independence referendum

David Coburn, UKIP’s victorious candidate in Scotland, yesterday thanked the First Minister for polarising the debate, as Labour accused the SNP of foolishly delivering a boost for Mr Farage. In a stinging attack, Labour's Scottish leader Johann Lamont said: 'Scotland now has three nationalist MEPs.'

After winning more than 140,000 votes in the contest, Mr Farage is now planning repeat visits Scotland in the run-up to September’s referendum as he feels he has a legitimate platform to speak out in favour of the Union.

He told the Mail: 'With the election of David Coburn as the first UKIP MEP [in Scotland], we have not just put a fox into Westminster’s henhouse, we have put a pine marten into the Holyrood one.

'We are the only truly national political party, and the success of UKIP in Scotland in these elections proves that there is a voice for those who believe in an independent Scotland as part of the UK.

'Alex Salmond now finally has to deal honestly and openly with the key contradictions in his position – independence in Europe is no independence at all.

'They know it, we know it, and now we can see the Scottish people know it as well.'

Mr Farage added: 'We have proven over the last few days that we are genuinely a UK independence party.

'Most of you have thought for years that every Ukip voter is a retired half colonel living on the edge of Salisbury plain desperate for the re-introduction for the birch and only cheering up after the first pink gin of the day.

'Well, we have got a few of those that vote for us there is no doubt about it. But actually we cross all social divides.

'In terms of geography that’s even more fascinating. We have made a breakthrough in Scotland - something which Alex Salmond will not enjoy very much at all. And we will inject a completely new dynamic into the referendum on separation that is coming up on September 18 this year.'

SNP leader Alex Salmond is confident of winning September's independence referendum despite polls showing a narrowing, but consistent, lead for the 'No' campaign

Nigel Farage won last week's UK-wide European elections - but finished only fourth in Scotland. But Ukip surprised pollsters by winning one seat north of the border

The final results of the European election were announced in Scotland yesterday lunchtime, with the SNP holding on for victory, despite a sharp rise in Labour’ s support.

With just over one-third of Scots voting in the contest - a total of 1.35million adults - the Nationalists won 28.9 per cent (389,503 votes) – down 0.2 points since 2009 – and Labour won 25.9 per cent (348,219 votes), up 5.1 points.

That handed both parties two seats in the European Parliament, with the Tories picking up a seat after winning a better-than-expected 17.2 per cent (231,330 votes) – it’s best total for around a quarter of a century.

Ukip secured an historic and unexpected fourth place, picking up Scotland’s sixth and final seat with 140,534 votes and a 10.4 per cent share, despite a shambolic campaign north of the Border. The Greens won 8 per cent and pushing the LibDems into a humiliating sixth place.

At the declaration of results in Edinburgh, Mr Coburn was rebuffed when he cheekily asked Shadow Scottish Secretary Margaret Curran if he could join the anti-independence Better Together campaign. Organisers have officially banned Ukip from joining the Tory/Labour/LibDem group, amid fears of fringe elements within the party.

But Mr Coburn said: 'The Ukip revolution has now come to Scotland.

He added: 'I’d like to thank Alex Salmond for his tremendous help in getting us elected.'

Throughout the election campaign, the SNP attempted to persuade Scots there was a direct contest between the third candidate on their list, Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh, and Mr Coburn.

Ukip’s success now makes it much harder for Mr Salmond to argue that Scotland and England are ‘different countries’ as he bids to boost support ahead of the independence referendum in September.

In desperation, the First Minister has resorted to blaming the media.

With 1.35million votes cast, the SNP won the backing of 389,503 Scots in Thursday’s contest, with Labour

But as yesterday’s results were announced, Labour’s lead candidate David Martin said: 'I’d like to suggest to David Coburn that the first thing he does when he sits down and recovers from the champagne is write a letter to Alex Salmond because there is no doubt in my mind that Alex Salmond’s decision to polarise the campaign, the Scottish debate, between two extremes is why David Coburn is with us today as a member of the European Parliament.'

That was met with mutterings of ‘poor show’ by deputy SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon.

She said later: 'Ukip topped the poll in England and have scraped the final seat in Scotland. The gulf between the performances is absolutely massive.'

Scotland's First Minister has turned the tables on Labour following devolution, becoming the dominant party in Holyrood - despite an electoral system designed to make one-party rule extremely difficult to achieve

But Scottish Labour leader Johann Lamont said: 'From Poland to France, Greece to Scotland we have seen the rise of nationalism and Scotland now has three nationalist MEPs.

'Alex Salmond and Nigel Farage represent the same things, but our country deserves better than the simple analysis that our neighbours are the problem dressed up in saloon bar charm. Those of us who believe in a just and fair Scotland need to stand firm in the face of these two.'

In response, SNP MEP Alyn Smith said: 'This is a boomerang attack from Johann Lamont – the hypocrisy of which helps explains why the SNP have just defeated Labour in yet another national election in Scotland, after more than seven years in government.

'Ukip did worse in Scotland than in any other part of Britain by far. Ukip topped the poll south of the Border because the Westminster parties have pandered to their agenda in Scotland. The SNP took them on – and we won the election.'

Tory MEP Ian Duncan, who takes over from the retired Struan Stevenson, said his party’s vote is the highest it has been for 25 years.

'We’ve bucked the national trend and it is a reminder that we have much to offer the people of Scotland,' he said.

'People are concerned about Europe and they want change. They want change to make Europe work for them, not against them, and I believe we have harnessed that concern and that feeling in a very simple way.'

Green candidate Maggie Chapman said: 'In this election we asked ‘What kind of Scotland do you want?’ The response has been the biggest-ever vote for the Greens, showing growing support for our vision of a Scotland which prizes economic justice, welcomes new Scots from around the world, and stands for peace.'


Last edited by Blackleaf; May 27th, 2014 at 08:25 AM..
 
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