What about Iceland? Why aren't the media covering it?


PoliticalNick
Free Thinker
+10
#1  Top Rated Post
Iceland has successfully forced the resignation of its' entire government, de-centralized the banking industry, and had the citizens rewrite their constitution. Among other outfall is that mortgages were forgiven to a point of affordability instead of being foreclosed upon. The fact that we see no coverage in the media of these changes and events can only lead one to believe that our corporate & bank controlled media and politicians don't want us to know and are scared we could follow suit and cut off their gravy train. We need to educate ourselves as to what the Icelandic citizens did and learn from them to take back control of our countries and our lives.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
+4
#2
Cool. Good for Iceland.
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/international/countriesandterritories/iceland/index.html
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

The fact that we see no coverage in the media of these changes and events can only lead one to believe....

I remember seeing something on TV about it. Not sure of the show or the channel. Realistically though, have we ever had much news about Iceland?
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
+3
#4
Never mind, if two people know a secret it is no longer a secret. Its not the media being controlled
by corporations. The real problem is the news people of today are trying to tell us about what the
stars are wearing that is real news eh? This will get out and have some impact once the so called
news crowd understands its a story. The truth always gets out and get out it will.
I think the anger over what happened in 2008 due to uncontrolled conservative policies will come
home to roost in the near future. These actions that destroyed so many economies were in fact the
extension of Reagan and Bush policies. but as I have said before voters are not the brightest even
when they see it in print. Do not ever confuse Education with intelligence.
 
PoliticalNick
Free Thinker
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

Never mind, if two people know a secret it is no longer a secret. Its not the media being controlled
by corporations. The real problem is the news people of today are trying to tell us about what the
stars are wearing that is real news eh? This will get out and have some impact once the so called
news crowd understands its a story. The truth always gets out and get out it will.
I think the anger over what happened in 2008 due to uncontrolled conservative policies will come
home to roost in the near future. These actions that destroyed so many economies were in fact the
extension of Reagan and Bush policies. but as I have said before voters are not the brightest even
when they see it in print. Do not ever confuse Education with intelligence.

You cannot find any news of this on CNN or MSNBC or any of the major media outlets. It hasn't been reported in any papers in North America. It is like it never happened....and yet it did happen. I mean how many here on CanCon knew of this before I posted this thread?
 
bill barilko
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

You cannot find any news of this on CNN or MSNBC or any of the major media outlets. It hasn't been reported in any papers in North America. It is like it never happened....and yet it did happen. I mean how many here on CanCon knew of this before I posted this thread?

I knew all about it-although I am one of the best informed people on this forum.

That being said Iceland isn't a particularly attractive place nor are Icelanders particularly likable people-they do themselves no favours being such nauseating know-it-alls.


IceNews, Daily news from Iceland, Scandinavia and Northern Europe.
 
PoliticalNick
Free Thinker
#7
This is big news in Iceland???

Gay penguins hatch egg at Danish zoo | IceNews - Daily News
 
WLDB
No Party Affiliation
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

This is big news in Iceland???

Gay penguins hatch egg at Danish zoo | IceNews - Daily News

They must be leading pretty good lives if thats big news for them.
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
#9
I knew some in fact they turned down two votes to assist the banks but the rest
of it was not covered. There was a Sunday Morning program on CNN that did
touch on a bit of it but that was it. As for the people of Iceland they are miles
ahead of us in terms of dealing with the governments and corporate entities
that directly effect their lives.
The reason they can put on a story far from this is they already dealt with it in a
timely manner its already behind them. I find the people of Iceland that I know
are very nice people, they are friendly but at the same time they they will show
you where the bear sh*t in the buckwheat pretty fast.
 
tay
+3
#10
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#11
Don't forget that the entire population of Iceland is only one mall city here. They are also pretty much all related somehow so change can be quick.
 
Nuggler
+2
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post

This is big news in Iceland???

Gay penguins hatch egg at Danish zoo | IceNews - Daily News


LOL; at least they're not doing the daily tabulations of drive-by gang bang shootings.

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Don't forget that the entire population of Iceland is only one mall city here. They are also pretty much all related somehow so change can be quick.


Hence they can go from true genius to drooling imbecile in the flick of a sister............(that's nasty eh)

Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

Just about says it all, Tay.

We don't have the balls to keep a kid killer in jail or tell the human rights commission to get stuffed.
________________________________________________


In the wild, the male penguin regularly holds (hatches) the egg, and the female goes fishing. So,, they give the man gay an egg, and the lady gay goes fishing. Big news. Good ol Iceland.

By Jeez, I knows me penguins............stole my ol uncles whole collection of Nat. Geographic years ago. Actually he left'em to me long before PC's.
 
Spade
Free Thinker
+1
#13
I thought Iceland was going to adopt the Canadian dollar as their currency.
No news? Iceland's hidden people should have a coming-out party.
 
china
Conservative
+2
#14
In summary of the Icelandic revolution, we saw:
-resignation of the entire corrupt government of the country
-nationalization of the bank
-referendum enabling the people to determine their own economic system
-incarceration of responsible parties, and
-a rewriting of the Iceland Constitution by its people
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darkbeaver
Republican
+3
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

In summary of the Icelandic revolution, we saw:
-resignation of the entire corrupt government of the country
-nationalization of the bank
-referendum enabling the people to determine their own economic system
-incarceration of responsible parties, and
-a rewriting of the Iceland Constitution by its people
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I think Iceland concluded that if you're going to pay for an economy it should be your own, and of course your own uncompromising state bank is probably handy.
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+2
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

In summary of the Icelandic revolution, we saw:
-resignation of the entire corrupt government of the country
-nationalization of the bank
-referendum enabling the people to determine their own economic system
-incarceration of responsible parties, and
-a rewriting of the Iceland Constitution by its people
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Definitely sounds like something Canada should be looking at.

Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

I thought Iceland was going to adopt the Canadian dollar as their currency.
No news? Iceland's hidden people should have a coming-out party.

Maybe we should adopt their currency instead.
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Maybe we should adopt their currency instead.

We already have a hand in Iceland's currency.

List of foreign countries with coinage struck at the Royal Canadian Mint - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
china
Conservative
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Definitely sounds like something Canada should be looking at.


Maybe we should adopt their currency instead.

Quote: Originally Posted by china
In summary of the Icelandic revolution, we saw:
-resignation of the entire corrupt government of the country
-nationalization of the bank
-referendum enabling the people to determine their own economic system
-incarceration of responsible parties, and
-a rewriting of the Iceland Constitution by its people
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Definitely sounds like something Canada should be looking at.

FIRST : The Truth About Canada's Banks & Their Success

A lot has been made about the relative strengths of the Canadian banking system. The newspapers are filled with stories about how the focus on "retail" has lead to lower risk profile for the Canadian banks. You have also been reading recently about the superior risk management focus of the Canadian banks and the superior compliance regime of both the banks and the Canadian regulators.
That's pretty neat stuff for us Canadians; hey we're number one! It was all pretty reasonable to the average bloke who has not worked inside the machinery of a big Canadian financial institution.....but I have and I can assure you it is all CRAP!


The reason Canadian Banks are so successful is quite simple. They have an oligopoly structure that lends itself to high margins through low competition strategies. In short, they make tons of profit by over-charging for virtually all domestic services! Need convincing? The evidence has been sitting staring at us for years so lets point out a couple of obvious situations to get us started!

High Interest Savings Accounts: For years the Canadian Banks have made a fortune by offering little or no interest on your savings account. In fact the situation got so ridiculous that a foreign bank figured out that they could pay for their whole expansion into Canada by exploiting the fat margins that existed on savings accounts. Thus that annoying ING guy made his appearance and told Canadians the ugly truth! Your banks are not paying you interest you dummies! Of course the banks were not about to fight back over one measely foreign bank offering fair interest rates.

Think about it.....if Royal has ten billion in savings accounts earning 0.25%, they are not about to start paying 2.25% and give up $200 million in profits. They( and all the other banks) just sacrificed a few hundred million in deposits each, that would drift to ING, counting on Canadian apathy to keep most of the money in their accounts! The Canadian banks did not react at all until the credit unions followed ING's lead; at which time they created a high interest saving option that was not as high as ING and the credit unions, but was enough to stem the flow of apathetic money from the big banks!

Credit Cards: Foreign credit card companies also noticed that Canadian rates were very high, even though losses were quite low. In the hyper competitive card market south of the border, aggressive credit granting and extreme marketing competition pushed card companies into high risk credit granting, expensive rewards programs, and aggressive direct marketing campaigns. No wonder the card interest rates were 19% to cover the losses and expenses. In Canada that was not quite the case. Rates were 19%, but marketing was through the branches to existing customers. Credit standards were still very reasonable and losses were consistently below the U.S. experience. Even better, the banks owned the card processing firms and could screw both the customers (think 19% rates) and the merchants who had to pay outragious fees for the privelege of accepting the cards! Again, the Canadian banks took it to the extreme and again foreign banks eventually stepped in. Check your mail box and see how often a U.S. monoline (sells only one product) firm has sent you a pre-approved card at a low teaser rate. Again, the banks are not about to match low rates and sacrifice the profits from tens of billions in outstanding card balances at 19%, or 24%, or 27%. Let Capital One or some other company steal the crumbs from the table, but never give in to the temptation to be competitive!
Need further proof? Canadian banks are paying huge class action fines for illegal foreign exchange fees on the credit cards! Canadian banks are the leading broker and mutual fund firms in Canada.....and Canadians pay the highest mutual fund fees in the world! Ask the small business guy about the cost of banking services in Canada!
So how does that make our banks the best in the world? How do you explain the lower risk profiles and the lack of idiotic leveraging? Simple actually; Canadian banks just were not willing to pull their capital out of Canada and forego the huge domestic profits to chase U.S. sub prime assets, or expand aggressively into the U.S. capital markets. While foreign banks greedily schemed and took risks to gain any slight advantage in terms of profit, it was a totally foriegn concept to the Big Five! Compete for profits? Surely you jest! Stay home; stay fat and happy!

So now you know! The success of the Canadian Banking System rests with us! If we were not suckers who overpay for all our banking services, then the big banks could not have been nearly so clever! Lets give ourselves a hand! Of course don't forget to thank the government, who through the weakest banking regulations in the free world, continue to let the oligopolies thrive!

Keeping with this fine Canadian tradition; you can apply the same logic to some of the worlds wealthiest civil servants, dairy farmers, and financial planners! Low competition, poor regulations and consumer apathy!
I am Canadian!
**********************

The System is the Scandal :
--------------------------
and no one should be surprised that Canadian governments, politicians, government employees, corporations and big business executives act dishonestly, unethically, secretively, non-representatively or wastefully --- the system allows them to do so through weak rules, weak enforcement, and weak penalties.
This is not at all to say that all, most or even many politicians, government employees or corporate executives are dishonest, unethical, secretive, non-representative or wasteful -- but if any of these people act in these ways they will often not be caught, let alone penalized, because of loopholes in laws and rules and weak enforcement systems.
No matter what issue concerns you, strong good government laws will help ensure that the government addresses your concerns. History has shown that we won't likely have a good country until we have good governments, we won't have a clean environment until we have clean governments, and we won't have a fair and just society until we have fair and just governments.
Incredibly, the laws and enforcement of parking a car illegally are stronger than most government accountability and corporate responsibility laws and enforcement systems in Canada, and in some cases the penalties for parking illegally are higher than for government officials or corporate executives who act dishonestly, unethically, unrepresentatively, secretively or wastefully!

For the past more than 140 years, since Canada became a nation (and section 91 of the Constitution of Canada empowered politicians to "make Laws for the Peace, Order, and good Government of Canada"), politicians and government officials have not been passing strong good government laws, but instead have been playing a game by sometimes strengthening laws, but then weakening enforcement, or strengthening enforcement at the same time as creating loopholes in laws, and in almost every case penalties have remained too weak to discourage violations.

While governments and corporations do bad things for many reasons, often it is because they are operating in bad ways. Especially when governments operate in bad ways, they usually do not require corporations to act in good ways (because they make secret deals behind closed doors with corporate lobbyists).

And unfortunately, the public always pays one way or another when governments or corporations act in bad ways.
See set out on this page Action Alerts about Democracy Watch's campaigns to increase government accountability and corporate responsibility in Canada -- to ensure governments, politicians and their staff and appointees, and government employees, and corporations and corporate executives, all pay a price for acting irresponsibly.

Politicians, government officials, and big business executives are resisting changes to the system that would increase their accountability for wrongdoing. Canadian politicians have control over their own rules, and Canada's biggest corporations spend $25 billion annually on their lobbying and promotion efforts, so Canadians have to push hard if there is any hope to counter the corporate lobby and win key corporate responsibility changes. They just don't get it, so we have to give it to them until they do!
We know the ongoing lack of response by governments and big businesses to Canadians' concerns is discouraging, but if we give up pushing then bad politicians and governments and irresponsible big businesses will do even more to hurt people, communities, the environment and the Canadian economy.
You can help clean up the system to prevent future scandals by simply writing letters to politicians making it clear that you are part of the large majority of Canadians who are concerned and want changes to clean up and democratize Canadian governments. Never assume that no one else is writing a letter, because if everyone assumes that then no one will write a letter. Politicians actually get very scared when only a small percentage of voters write them, because they are very concerned about losing the next election.
Democracy Watch welcomes your support -- thank you for doing your part for democracy and corporate responsibility in Canada!

[QUOTE=china;1687550]Quote: Originally Posted by china
In summary of the Icelandic revolution, we saw:
-resignation of the entire corrupt government of the country
-nationalization of the bank
-referendum enabling the people to determine their own economic system
-incarceration of responsible parties, and
-a rewriting of the Iceland Constitution by its people
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Definitely sounds like something Canada should be looking at.

**********************

---------------------------------

No corruption in Canada? Give me a break!

By Klaus Rohrich

Tuesday, December 12,
An interesting article in the National Post caught my eye last week. It was written by Edward Miguel and Raymond Fisman, two professors teaching economics and business at UC Berkley and Columbia University, respectively. Their thesis revolved around official corruption and which countries fostered the culture of corruption.

Using the number of unpaid parking tickets that UN officials owed to the City of New York, Miguel and Fisman concluded that Chad and Bangladesh were the most corrupt countries in the world, because of 1,243 and 1,319 unpaid parking tickets, respectively. They then concluded that Canada whose UN delegates had 0 unpaid parking tickets, was the least corrupt.

Maybe if we're talking about parking tickets they have a point, as parking tickets tend to be small potatoes not worth making waves. But to conclude that systemic corruption in a nation is indicative by how their diplomats handle parking infractions may be a stretch. The authors stated "to perform such an experiment, you first need to bring together public officials from around the world to the same place where they are given the opportunity to break the law. You also have to make sure that they are permitted to break the law without fear of consequence- in order to remove the influence of tangible incentives, and isolate the effect of culture.”

They then conclude (with certain caveats) that Canadians have "an inner Dudley Do-right” and tend to be the most honest people on the planet. The caveats were disclaimers that, for instance, people tended to adjust to local circumstances, as a Canadian in Nigeria was more likely to engage in corrupt behavior because that's how things get done in there. They even mentioned the recent Adscam scandal that resulted in the Gomery inquiry as an example of how shady government dealings are ferreted out and come to light in a country such as Canada.

But by and large, I think Mssrs. Miguel and Fisman miss the point about the nature of corruption in a country such as Canada. It isn't that Canadians are inherently more honest and decent, it's that we are subjected to a culture of "soft” corruption. We don't have policemen holding out their hands for bribes, as these actions are too crass. We do have the soft corruption of politicians treating themselves lavishly at the public's expense. Our civil servants and heads of crown corporations tend to be particularly adept at bending the rules when it comes to between meal feedings at the public trough, which is evidenced most recently by the Ontario Government's Auditor General, who reported misspending on the part of many high-level executives of organizations such as the Children's' Aid Society. Hydro One's former chief, Tom Parkinson, resigned in disgrace last week after the Auditor General revealed that Parkinson had inappropriately charged $45,000 to his executive assistant's corporate credit card for personal expenses. On top of that Parkinson will now receive a buy-out package worth some $3 million.

In 2000, Sheila Fraser the Federal Auditor General revealed that one billion dollars was essentially unaccounted for in then Human Resources Minister Jane Stewart's department. Then there is the matter of the $600,000 loan to the gran mére hotel, which Jean Chretien, the Prime Minister of Canada personally shepherded. When the head of the Canadian Business Development Bank objected to granting the loan, his career was unceremoniously destroyed.

The Gomery inquiry detailed how nearly $200 million disappeared into various Quebec sponsorship programs, a significant portion of which found its way back into the coffers of Quebec's Liberal Party. Not a single politician was punished as a result of the Adscam scandal, while two small-fry, Jean Brault and Chuck Guité, received slaps on the wrist.

Yes, corruption in Canada is hard to find, but that's more a function of the sophistication of those in power than it is a reflection of their innate honesty.

Klaus Rohrich is senior columnist for Canada Free Press. Klaus also writes topical articles for numerous magazines. He has a regular column on retirementhomes.com and is currently working on his first book dealing with the toxicity of liberalism.Ê His work has been featured on the Drudge Report, Rush Limbaugh, Fox News and Lucianne, among others.Ê He lives and works in a small town outside of Toronto and
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It would be terrific to have some input in a Constitution of our country ,to have a responsible and accountable Government knowing that the money in a bank belongs to the people .
I also believe that we should return back the death penalty ( for the corrupt politicians ) .That is a decision of the people .
Well its a nice dream .

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Scotiabank to buy ING Bank of Canada for $3.1B


ING Direct name will eventually change
CBC News Posted: Aug 29, 2012 4:50 PM ET Last Updated: Aug 29, 2012 8:51 PM ET Read 105 comments105
ING Direct CEO Peter Aceto holds one of the company's debit cards at the service's launch in 2010. The company's Dutch parent said earlier this month it was considering selling the Canadian unit. (Canadian Press)
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ING mulls sale of Canadian bank unit
The distinctive orange brand of ING Bank of Canada that attracted a legion of loyal clients with its no-fee promise that it wasn’t like the other big banks will itself soon be owned by one.

After the markets closed on Wednesday, Scotiabank announced that it was buying ING Bank of Canada for $3.13 billion.

Scotiabank will put up $1.9 billion and fund the rest through the issuance of 29 million shares at $52 apiece.

From its arrival in Canada in 1997, its distinctive ING Direct brand has championed that it was different — it "wasn’t like a typical bank," as its advertising pointed out.

It had no physical branches, charged no service fees, insisted on no minimum balance in client accounts, offered cheaper and flexible mortgages than the big guys, and consistently paid above-average interest in its chequing and savings accounts.

In just 15 years, those selling points helped it to attract 1.8 million clients and $30 billion in retail deposits. It had another $30 billion in loans on its books, primarily in mortgages.

It quickly grew to become the eighth largest bank in Canada and is currently the largest internet bank in the country.

Struggling parent
But then came the European financial crisis.

Its Dutch parent, ING Groep NV, is struggling to keep its balance sheet healthy amid bad loans in Europe and declining margins.

Earlier this month, it signalled that it was exploring the possibility of shedding its Canadian and British units – something it had already done with its American unit. It sold ING Direct U.S. to Capital One.

Reports suggested that the Big Six banks were very interested in ING Bank of Canada. Its mortgage loan book was considered especially attractive.

But what about that much-ballyhooed distinctiveness? Both sides in this deal rushed to reassure ING Direct’s Canadian clients that it would be business as usual.

"Scotiabank is committed to preserving what ING Direct's customers have come to love about it," said Scotiabank executive Anatol von Hahn, in a release. "ING Direct … customers will be able to interact the way they do now using their existing account numbers and passwords, served by the same familiar team."

Name change within 18 months
Similar assurances came from ING.

"For our customers, we expect no change ... we will continue to offer our customers the highly competitive and attractively priced products that we have become known for, and we will be continuing our efforts to earn more customers with our focus on Canadians who are self-directed," ING Direct CEO Peter Aceto said in an afternoon conference call.

So clients will likely continue to see and hear those high-profile "save your money" exhortations for a while. But change is coming.

Company officials say the brand will survive for at least 14 months after the deal closes. But the name will change within 18 months.

Scotiabank said its takeover of ING Direct should be a done deal by December, subject to regulatory approvals. It said its acquisition of ING Direct would add to its earnings within the first year of ownership.

On Tuesday, Scotiabank reported its third-quarter profits grew by 57 per cent to $2.05 billion as several divisions improved performance and the bank also benefited from the sale of its Toronto headquarters.
Last edited by china; Dec 14th, 2012 at 07:15 PM..
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
+1
#19
Is someone having a boring day?
 
Nuggler
+2
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Is someone having a boring day?


I was going to quote his whole post but just haven't the nerve...........We could run out of space.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#21
Canada has no banks except the Bank of Canada which it is forbidden by the internationalist to use as intended. All other "Canadian" in banks Canada aren't Canadian, they just do business for the BIS from Canada. Ask Mark Carney, oops he's been promoted to make the UK stink smell better.
 
china
Conservative
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Is someone having a boring day?

Nope , the opposite .Don't have very much time .It's so easy to copy an article and place it ....without any editing .
 
tay
+1
#23
Iceland Decides Against Joining The EU




Iceland's bid to join the EU is over, the country's foreign minister told the European Commission.

"This is how democracy works," said Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, on his first overseas trip, three weeks after being appointed to the recently elected Icelandic government.

He pointed out that both parties in the new government had campaigned against EU accession.

He commented that the main purpose of the trip had been "to tell the commission that the new government has made decision to put negotiations on hold.


"We are part of Europe and want to strengthen our relationship in other ways," he added.

Speaking during a frosty press conference with reporters Stefan Fule, the Czech commissioner responsible for EU membership bids, admitted that Iceland's decision was a personal blow.

"It was not easy for me as a person (to take the decision)," said Fule. But he added: "I am also a professional and I respect without any questions and any doubt, the will of elected representative and citizens".


EUobserver.com / Political Affairs / Iceland's EU bid is over, commission told
 
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