Burial, cremation or other?


Locutus
#1
What are your wishes when the time comes?
 
Tonington
#2
Buried at sea. Organs donated.
 
Kreskin
#3
I want to be shot out of a cannon. If that isn't possible I'll take cremation.
 
DaSleeper
#4
Both my wife and I have decided on cremation, we figure we have paid all our lives to stay somewhere, whether it's rent, or buying a house, we don't want to pay for a cemetery plot.....our ashes will be spread in the woods of northern Ontario..........
 
Sal
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

I want to be shot out of a cannon. If that isn't possible I'll take cremation.

That gave me a water choke.
 
Sal
#6
Matters not to me at all. I do not view the physical body as important after death. I know most cultures do out of respect for the person. I can't quite go there for me. Stick me in a plastic bad and ditch me, couldn't care less. What ever is best for whoever may be left behind, suits me.
 
karrie
#7
cremation (I've seen a rotting corpse, don't want to be one thanks), and interment. This earth needs more green spaces.
 
DurkaDurka
#8
I am going to have my head cryogenically frozen and when science permits, I will have my head attached to a tickle me elmo doll.
 
JoeSchmoe
#9
Chop me up and use me as crab bait. Crabs are yummmy.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#10
I don't intend to die.

But if I must ... bury me as long as you make damn sure I'm dead first.
 
karrie
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I don't intend to die.

But if I must ... bury me as long as you make damn sure I'm dead first.

My great grandma made my dad promise that he'd check twice that she was really truly certainly dead before they cremated her.
 
Sal
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

My great grandma made my dad promise that he'd check twice that she was really truly certainly dead before they cremated her.

Yeah, my mum told me to make sure she was dead before they buried her. Funny thing is, you actually think about it with humour at the time because of their request. Kinda lightens things a bit.
 
Toro
#13
I'm never doing to die so its not an issue with me.
 
Kreskin
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurkaView Post

I am going to have my head cryogenically frozen and when science permits, I will have my head attached to a tickle me elmo doll.

Lol.

I was wondering if I could have my body shrunk to the size of a single sperm and cryopreserved. If someday scientists can separate half of my chromosomes (un-meiosis me) they could then refertilize it with the ova of Paris Hilton. (I need to update my will).
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#15
Stuffed...proped up to a computer screen with CC on.......just in case someone mentions Dave....ya just never know
 
Dexter Sinister
#16
Any usable organs donated--I've signed the donor card and made sure my next of kin understand my wishes--whatever's left cremated and scattered to return all the atoms to the earth they came from. Somebody else might be able to use them, no sense locking them up in a casket for however long it takes for nature to break it down and do it anyway. And everybody should have a party--on me, from the proceeds of the estate--to celebrate my life, not mourn my death. I want there to be a party, like the ones we had for my parents when they left us, that I'd want to be at. And maybe I will be in some form, who knows. I sure don't, and I don't believe anyone else does either.
 
s_lone
#17
It would be kinda cool to have my body propulsed towards the sun...

But realistically, I would simply want to be buried in a biodegradable coffin and have a tree planted over my corpse.
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter SinisterView Post

Any usable organs donated--I've signed the donor card and made sure my next of kin understand my wishes--whatever's left cremated and scattered to return all the atoms to the earth they came from. Somebody else might be able to use them, no sense locking them up in a casket for however long it takes for nature to break it down and do it anyway. And everybody should have a party--on me, from the proceeds of the estate--to celebrate my life, not mourn my death. I want there to be a party, like the ones we had for my parents when they left us, that I'd want to be at. And maybe I will be in some form, who knows. I sure don't, and I don't believe anyone else does either.

if ya want tpo spread it round try a Tibetan sky burial....
the monks chop you up into morsels and feed you to the vultures....that way you really do enter the food chain and nature!!!!


And here's wishing ya the best at that party.....

Great tradition Dex....the whole mourning the loss thing is not my cuppa either....
 
Dexter Sinister
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by DocDredView Post

...try a Tibetan sky burial....the monks chop you up into morsels and feed you to the vultures....that way you really do enter the food chain and nature!!!!

Nice idea. One way or another we're all going to end up back in the food chain anyway, might as well give Mother Nature a hand...
Quote:

And here's wishing ya the best at that party.....Great tradition Dex....the whole mourning the loss thing is not my cuppa either....

Agreed. Grief, while a certain amount of it is unavoidable, seems essentially selfish to me, because it's about ourselves, what we have lost. You have to work your way through it--and it *is* work--but it shouldn't last a long time. I grieved the death of my parents, but not for a long time, it was inevitable and natural and necessary, and when it finally happened, it was time. Past time, actually, their final few years were pretty miserable for them. A few days after my father died one of my brothers and I got together, he brought a bottle of fine old Irish whisky, I had a 12 year old single malt scotch, we sat up all night, drank both bottles, dredged up every nasty rotten thing, every mistake, we could ever remember dad doing, and completely purged ourselves of all the negatives. After that we were free to mourn our loss and remember him with great love for all the good things he was and did, and now, only the positives remain. He was a good but imperfect man, as are we, and he loved us without reservation, as we do our children. That's all that matters.

It was an excellent catharsis, I recommend it.
 
mrmom2
#20
Ashes spread on a certain mountain top here in BC in the middle of winter .Of course said ashes have to be transported there by snowmobile
 
lone wolf
#21
Find me ten square feet. Mix my ashes into good rich earth and plant a sexed pot seed (or female clone) Tend it with loving care, nipping her and pruning as required. Following the second frost in October, harvest and clean and cure. Then, everyone can have a toot on me....

Woof!
 
karrie
#22
that's an awfully complicated way to go about being cremated twice wolf.
 
lone wolf
#23
Closest to immortality I'm gonna get....

Woof!
 
triedit
#24
I want a closed casket at the viewing. I don't want anyone going past and saying "She looks so natural". The ulitmate insult. Hopefully I looked better alive than dead.

Give away any parts that are useful for transplant or science or even for the CSI people to practice on.

Then if there's anything left just creamate me and dump the ashes in the Ohio River.
 
karrie
#25
I want a closed casket, depending on how I died. If I died like my aunt, after months of pain and exhaustion, leave the damn thing open so people can see that I'm not in pain anymore.
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter SinisterView Post

Nice idea. One way or another we're all going to end up back in the food chain anyway, might as well give Mother Nature a hand...
Agreed. Grief, while a certain amount of it is unavoidable, seems essentially selfish to me, because it's about ourselves, what we have lost. You have to work your way through it--and it *is* work--but it shouldn't last a long time. I grieved the death of my parents, but not for a long time, it was inevitable and natural and necessary, and when it finally happened, it was time. Past time, actually, their final few years were pretty miserable for them. A few days after my father died one of my brothers and I got together, he brought a bottle of fine old Irish whisky, I had a 12 year old single malt scotch, we sat up all night, drank both bottles, dredged up every nasty rotten thing, every mistake, we could ever remember dad doing, and completely purged ourselves of all the negatives. After that we were free to mourn our loss and remember him with great love for all the good things he was and did, and now, only the positives remain. He was a good but imperfect man, as are we, and he loved us without reservation, as we do our children. That's all that matters.

It was an excellent catharsis, I recommend it.

great post Dexter....

The absense of all the hocus pocus afterlife is refreshing as well.....

For me ...it's up to you where ya are going and no one left here can help you with that....
 
hermanntrude
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I don't intend to die.

But if I must ... bury me as long as you make damn sure I'm dead first.

the victorians had a widespread fear that they'd be buried alive, since certain diseases can leave you unconscious with no detectable respiration or pulse. The response was to create coffins with small holes in, through which were connected some pulleys and strings so that if anyone woke inside their coffin they could pull on the strings which'd ring a bell at the surface.
 
hermanntrude
#28
I want to be plasticised so everyone can admire my beauty
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by hermanntrudeView Post

the victorians had a widespread fear that they'd be buried alive, since certain diseases can leave you unconscious with no detectable respiration or pulse. The response was to create coffins with small holes in, through which were connected some pulleys and strings so that if anyone woke inside their coffin they could pull on the strings which'd ring a bell at the surface.

Thats sounds like a great idea. Do they still make those pulleys and bells?
 
Vereya
#30
It's cremation for me. I don't want to see my body rot after I die. We believe that the souls lingers for some time here after you die. Not far from the body. And if the body is cremated, the souls gets to where it is supposed to much faster.
By the way, in Russia cremation is much more expensive than interrment. I wonder, is it the same way in the West?
 

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