Quitting smoking again


triedit
#1
I love to smoke. Truly. I love the experience.
But I know its bad for me, for my family, makes my house stink, yada yada

So I am once again attempting to quit.

Ive tried the patch. Ive gotten involved in self help groups (man all they talk about is smoking--makes me want one more!). I can't take zyban because it interacts with my other meds.

Ive been able to not smoke through each of my pregnancies without a problem.

So starts day two.
 
SwitSof
#2
I reckon it's the will.
A flatmate said she liked smoking, cause it made her relax. But she then realised she's burning money and her wages weren't high back then in Romania, she's Romanian btw.
So she just decided to quit and she said she didn't have any problem, even physically. She still missed it she said and actually slipped to smoke again once or twice, but so far I've seen her smoking about 3 times during 3 months I've lived with her and we are colleagues too.
I'm not a smoker so I can't say much...

I used to drink a lot of coffee though. Especially when I was working in Japan, it could be very hectic or I was so stressed that I could only sleep for 2 hours in times before having to drag my feet to go to work again. Hence, I would stop by to Starbucks to get the cup bigger than Grande, it's called Vivente with 2 more shots of espresso so in total it's like 5 shots in one cup. And since I can't take hot drinks unless I wait for it to cool down nor that I had the patience to wait, I'd have ice coffee and would just finish the whole thing while walking to the office from the coffee shop which was about 15 min!
So I got addicted to coffee, more of psychologically cause I don't really like the taste of coffee, black one, so would have to put milk and sugar at least one of the 2. And I have migraine too and there are times I can't tell whether I have the headache cause of too much coffee or cause of migraine. Even though it's said coffee is good for people who have migraine and low blood pressure and I have both too.
So I decided to reduce and I had bad headaches in times cause my body was adapting to the reduced intake of caffeine, therefore I did it gradually, which is probably what you can do too with smoking.
Plus, just think of your family as the motivator.
My dad had heart disease and high cholesterol but he loved his steak, drinking heaps of black coffee and smoking like a chimney, oh and didn't exercise, so his heart failed him at the age of 43!
My family realised part of the reason was these bad habits of his, so my brother never attempted to smoke even when he was a teen and I'm sure he was teased by his friends in high school who asked him to try out smoking, but well he knows better...
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by trieditView Post

I love to smoke. Truly. I love the experience.
But I know its bad for me, for my family, makes my house stink, yada yada

So I am once again attempting to quit.

Ive tried the patch. Ive gotten involved in self help groups (man all they talk about is smoking--makes me want one more!). I can't take zyban because it interacts with my other meds.

Ive been able to not smoke through each of my pregnancies without a problem.

So starts day two.


I did it whe i was 37...hell if it were not for Sandy's nagging and huge @#^6 i prolly would be hacking away today.....
But seriously this is what happened it might help you........

Oddly it invovlves Sandy...hahahaha....
Ok sandy's mum died of emphazemma from smoking. Me Nanny did too, well hidgskins desease back in 60's.....she was a heavy heavy smoker.....


Ok so every time i saw someone with an air tank walking round Sandy would Nag about thats gonna be me.....I wanted to quit smoking..started to want to and read somewhere where if you can do it before you are forty is a good thing for the cells have enopugh power to really bounce back....my Ma did it at 64...she's 84 next month and it has had a marvelous effect on those 20 years, her quitting.......

so all of a sudden I start to see 3 sometimes 5 people with air cannisters a day....every day!!!! i swear to you....this went on for months, prolly 5?,
It started to really make me feel like the whole world is dieing from smoking....anywho I quit...bam shanga lang cold friggin turkey....ceptin for this neurotics idea of aid.....there was this guy back in the 80's hung out at grossman's wore a players navy cut jacket all the time....old time great laker seaway faring man....fun to drink with..real character.always had a twisted stick of licorice root in his mouth or hand....He explained to me that he used it to quit smoking10 years ago and never got rid......so i got me some licorice roots at the health store and found out that there is something in it that aids addiction...bounus...but it really helped out with the hand thing...you know something to do with your hands...and you get to chew on thing and look neurotic as hell......

Anywho 5 weeks no smoky smoky and like me head starts telling me stuff like....if this stuff was really that bad for you would they sell in with candy...eeeek....come on dude ya feel all better now dontchs....oooooook......you know it ain't gonna kill ya this is all coincidental media crap....i swear i was thinking this stuff like it had a life of it's own(whole other thread).....So off i goes to the variety store to buy some smokes......As I open the door , and hold it for this old lady with an oxygen air cannister...i realize since i quit i have not seen one of these suckers.......i swear to God......she walks passed me...looked at me wierd for the expresasion on my face must have been quite the site......
i left...did not buy em......never once have i had the urge to do it again ...It was wierd for I really felt something had set this whole thing up for me....Don't know who or what...but it really felt like it was sooo obvious that if i did not listen ot would be like one of the worst things i ever could do in my ognorance.....
Robin...it's ignorance that keeps ya smoking kid....it's not exactly heroin...but it is still a crippling addiction...crippling if you can't quit and you want to ..if ya catch my drift......
Hell if you feel the need get yer *** down to a Canadian Legion and have a look see atsome of the patrons
 
#juan
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by trieditView Post

I love to smoke. Truly. I love the experience.
But I know its bad for me, for my family, makes my house stink, yada yada

So I am once again attempting to quit.

Ive tried the patch. Ive gotten involved in self help groups (man all they talk about is smoking--makes me want one more!). I can't take zyban because it interacts with my other meds.

Ive been able to not smoke through each of my pregnancies without a problem.

So starts day two.

As an ex-smoker for twenty years, and a veteran of many attempts to quit, I feel I'm an authority on quitting. What you need is not an authority on quitting but an authority on staying quit. All I can say is take it one hour at a time and one day at a time and that things get easier once you get past the first three weeks. Don't hang around with people who smoke. Avoid morning coffee like the plague.....that's when the addiction is strongest. Never, ever, think, "One cigarette won't hurt". It will.

Good Luck!
Last edited by #juan; Jul 8th, 2007 at 01:46 PM..
 
BitWhys
#5
Zyban gets rid of the heebeejeebees but for me it just elevated my systemic myanthropy to the point of being an art form. Sometimes being easily distracted is a good thing.

good luck. try not to turn evil.
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by BitWhysView Post


good luck. try not to turn evil.

AAAAA HAHAHAHAHAHA
That's funny. it's the one liners on this thing that get me the most.
Said in my best Alexi Sayle voice"I love a laugh "

Last edited by Dreadful Nonsense; Jul 8th, 2007 at 12:56 PM..
 
Toro
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by trieditView Post

I love to smoke.

I've never, ever heard anyone say that.


Well, not tobacco anyways...
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by ToroView Post

I've never, ever heard anyone say that.


Well, not tobacco anyways...

do you smoke....I loved it once ..now the smell makes me think ogre food..bleh
 
triedit
#9
One stumbling block I had for a long time was that it was something of the old me I carried into Canada and something that drove Doug nuts. I don't have that anymore. He now allows me to smoke in my office so I don't have to sneak around. I sorta liked that sneaking around--it was part of the high. Now that's gone so maybe this time....

I do have suckers for the hand to mouth issue.

But it does come down to will. Ive given up so much in the past 10 years. I recenlty got off coke (cola!) and switched to diet drinks and using fake sugar in tea and coffee. This was HUGE for me because I used to drink like 4 or 5 cans of coke a day. Now Im down to two, maybe 3 cans of diet pepsi. That was tough. Before that I gave up one of my daughters and my home town and my whole country....sounds like Im whining but Im not. Being here is ok, not really all that different from "home" but there are long term issues about my oldest daughter not coming with us even though it was her choice. Then I gave up my middle-aged empty nest happiness and had the boy, who is wonderful and I love him but boy is he a lot of work.

So basically the cigarettes were the only "old me" left. Im not sure who I am anymore.
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by trieditView Post


So basically the cigarettes were the only "old me" left. Im not sure who I am anymore.

sounds like yer in withdrawl which will go away soon enough...hang tuff kid....The boy would love his mom healthy and old when he is the man.
 
SwitSof
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by trieditView Post

So basically the cigarettes were the only "old me" left. Im not sure who I am anymore.

There was once a quote I heard that you're (in general) not defined by what you do i.e. your job, so certainly you're not defined by your habits either.
I suppose part of you is the reflection of your daughter and your son because they were brought up by you, the way you stood up for your friend, how you opened the door of your home to invite the forum members here to get together, and how you made some compromises by say moving to another country for your family's sake, etc. These are some things amongst many that define you, I reckon.
 
Vereya
#12
I once tried to quit smoking, and I went for three days without a single cigarette, and I didn't even feel like I want to smoke. The trouble was that I couldn't sleep these three days, and that made me smoke again.
The worst thing about smoking is the smell. I always feel the urge to quit smoking after I take a nice long bath, and then I come out of the bathroom, smelling so nice, and I put on my dressing-gown, and it stinks of cigarette smoke. That's just disgusting. But it is soooo nice to smoke a cigarette after a nice long bath.....
 
Dreadful Nonsense
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by VereyaView Post

I once tried to quit smoking, and I went for three days without a single cigarette, and I didn't even feel like I want to smoke. The trouble was that I couldn't sleep these three days, and that made me smoke again.
The worst thing about smoking is the smell. I always feel the urge to quit smoking after I take a nice long bath, and then I come out of the bathroom, smelling so nice, and I put on my dressing-gown, and it stinks of cigarette smoke. That's just disgusting. But it is soooo nice to smoke a cigarette after a nice long bath.....

erm yer not helping
 
china
#14
Nicotine is a highly addictive drug and is considered as addictive as heroin. That means it should not be messed around with – like a dangerous trap or a poisonous snake – it’s best to just keep away – most smokers start by thinking they’ll just smoke one a day, or only at night, or what not – but for most people it gets out of control before they know it – specially as soon as something goes wrong. Knowledge of how harmful smoking is, does not seem to help a person change. I have known cancer patients who could not give up smoking even in their death-bed. One of my co-workers died from cigs after losing his voice and his tongue to cancer. So, what is it that's going to help a person kick this nasty habit? Generally speaking, any sort of change requires first seeing what is. I see time and again smokers who are utterly unhappy at smoking - as they take a puff, you can see the pain they experience - often they give a hopeless look at the cigarette and wonder if they are gaining anything in return for this pain of doing something totally unnatural. Many smokers testify that out of the 20 cigs they may smoke in a day they barely "enjoy" one or two - in fact, the rest, they may hate - can you imagine the level of conflict and energy wastage that the person goes through if all day they do what they hate? The first step is to admit you are addicted - that is a sign of intelligence. I sometimes run into a few heavy smokers who say they smoke because they want to smoke - either they are lying or they've never tried to quit to find out how hard it can be. I know people who tried everything but couldn't quit. I know a acupuncture doctor who was treating patients for smoking but was a smoker himself. There are also a class of people who smoke one or two cigs occasionally - that is not problematic.
Quitting cigs means a change in lifestyle from an unhealthy one to a healthy one. Other than that nothing will change, so giving up smoking does not mean giving up everything in life - though any change has an effect on one's world - however small. Your friends who smoke will undoubtedly be effected - that is if you are still hanging out with them - my grandmother used to recite an old poem which said good friends lift you to the highest points and bad friends drag you down to the lowest - that is not to say smokers are bad people, but you get my point - it's called peer-pressure. I think the most important thing is to understand the process of smoking and addiction. There are two kinds of dependence: physical and psychological. Let's look at them:
1. Physical dependence - this one is the easy part - the body, the central nervous system, is addicted to nicotine. Nicotine, I believe (some doctors agree), is a double edge drug: it works as a stimulant against depressants (e.g. alcohol), and as a depressant against stimulants (e.g. caffeine). So, it's a constant up and down cycle - and it becomes easier to quit if for a while one lighten or avoid the intake of alcohol, coffee, non-herbal tea, coca-cola, etc. (if you are addicted to these, it's easier on you to gradually lower your intake), some experts say even onions should be avoided too - but these are just tips which may or may not be important. The idea is to have a healthy life style: to eat right food - avoid meat, sugar and artificial food, eat some raw food, exercize, get enough sleep, and, hey, why not get a message if you can! All these things make the body feel good in itself by itself, so it doesn't crave for happiness from a cigarette. Breathing exercizes (deep breathing) also helps. The good news is that 3 days without nicotine, and it's out of your system. But be careful, the next time you drink a large cup of coffee, or a few beers, the body may have an urge for the antidote. Switching to ultra-low-tar cigs also helps ease the withdrawal. Hang in there - it only takes a bit of time to get used to the lighter cigs - but it may be better to just go "cold turkey". Know beforehand what to expect: irritability, restlessness, etc., for only a few days.
2. Psychological dependence - I believe lack of understanding of this is why smoking is so hard to kick. The key here is to observe yourself very carefully, how you are feeling, what you are thinking, when you pick up a cigarette. Cigarette plays the role of a friend who says: let me celebrate with you when you are happy, or let me help you when you are sad - but it does neither - it just sneaks in poisons into the blood stream. Seeing what you are - seeing the connection between how you feel/think and wanting a cigarette - in daily life, not theoretically - is a tremendously powerful insight which brings about its own action and change (the art of seeing is a whole topic by itself which I won't go into now - to see clearly one must look with a quiet brain, otherwise one judges what is seen based on past experience - when that judging too is seen, it can change - but as long as the judge, the observer, separates itself from what it sees no change takes place because the seer is the seen. Seeing requires being totally in the present). I know a veteran smoker who had such a strong insight that he immediately quit for good. And when a dear pleasure is ended one gains a lot of strength from having died - to a habit.
And order in life is also important. When there is order one can be at peace easier - and much of the craving for cigs or drugs is a craving for peace - so, may I suggest: clean up your room and your life, and cigs will just fall-away as a natural consequence. If your have mess in your life you do not have the energy to change. When you are in conflict with yourself you suffer so much that you are willing to pay any price for happiness so you say "to heck with it - I'll quit in the future'. Change in future is an illusion. Change can only take place now. Can we live without craving? Can I observe craving in my body/mind so fully that I bring it to an end? Can I live without any stimulation: emotionally, chemically, intellectually? The answer is yes, but you will have to find the answer yourself otherwise it is merely words.
There are a class of smokers who are mostly young, who are closet smokers - even in the street or in their car when they notice that someone is seeing them smoke they are ashamed. Why? Probably because they don't want to look stupid? A lot of interesting things happen in the "closet", the battle to quit can be a tough one. Fighting it only makes it stronger, because you lose energy in the conflict, in the friction, between what you are and what you think you should be - whereas just seeing it can bring it's own change - energy is required for change. Smoking causes stress, as caffeine does in most people, but people often try to use these things to combat stress which is a vicious circle. One young girl told me she stopped exercizing when she started smoking so that she does not feel how bad cigarettes are for her! Many people, specially older smokers, lose the flame of discontent which is necessary for kicking the habit, and helplessly give up and put up with smoking: a gradual painful suicide.
Cigarettes make your beautiful teeth dirty, make your beautiful hair and skin look unhealthy, make your clothes smell, contaminate your breath/mouth smell, are bad for all of your body: lungs, heart, and all senses: you can not taste, smell, see, hear, feel as well as you could. They disrupt the most fundamental living process: breath. You wake up and you have the residue of all the junk around your eyes and in your body. Your body has to work extra hard to keep itself pure, it has to constantly fight with the damage to the lungs, etc. (so smokers need to take extra vitamin C). You know what some smokers do? Have cigarettes and coffee for breakfast because after the body has purified itself in sleep, you get the most pleasure - when you are young you can get away with that but if this sort of regime continues it dulls the body's intelligence and makes it insensitive: the sensitivity that is required for happiness, health, and an extraordinary way of life (Leonard Cohen: "Well I've been where you're hanging I can see how you're pinned"). Many marijuana smokers say it is natural - yes, maybe the grass is natural, but the process of inhaling smoke is totally contradictory to life. And you can see what happens to these people when they get older: they become dull like a rock - like a stone - from getting stoned!
Cigarettes are expensive for your pockets as well as your health. It's better to put out the cigarette after 2 hits if you are not enjoying it than to smoke it all because they are expensive! Psychically speaking - (not scientific but interesting) - Charles Leadbeater wrote that narcotics (including nicotine), reverse the direction of energy flow in the chakras which makes you have good feeling but it damages the chakras – someone told me recently since they started smoking 2 weeks ago, they’ve had "devil attacks"! Also, a smoker's life becomes overly complicated for various reasons, including (again, not scientifically speaking) attracting negativity, because one is poisoning the system, "you attract what you are". As the saying goes, "happy go lucky" - and we can add to it: "healthy goes happy". Keep the flame alive, and Good Luck.
As the joke goes: "It's OK if you want to smoke - just don't exhale". "I love you just the way you are...". A last piece of advice: Love is the best catalyst for change - so "fall in love" - it worked for me
 
Unforgiven
#15
For me it was the after eating smoke. I loved the statisfaction I got from that.
I still get cravings after all these years. Especially when passing by smokers and you get that little taste of the smoke breathing in. That's a killer.

Everytime I quit smoking I gained weight. With the return of my sense of taste, it made controling my eating an issue.

Quote: Originally Posted by VereyaView Post

I once tried to quit smoking, and I went for three days without a single cigarette, and I didn't even feel like I want to smoke. The trouble was that I couldn't sleep these three days, and that made me smoke again.
The worst thing about smoking is the smell. I always feel the urge to quit smoking after I take a nice long bath, and then I come out of the bathroom, smelling so nice, and I put on my dressing-gown, and it stinks of cigarette smoke. That's just disgusting. But it is soooo nice to smoke a cigarette after a nice long bath.....

 
Impetus
#16
I guess what kills me about smokers is that with all the evidence of adverse health effects for them and anyone breathing the second hand smoke, they still manage to somehow rationalize their habit.

It's not like there's a "chance" it will affect the health, it's a certain, incremental effect that they often cannot measure until it's too late.

Only after quitting do they typically start to smell the stench of their smoky clothes, dwellings, automobiles and other smokers.

My pity goes out to the one spouse who tries to quit while the other spouse smokes on...I have a friend who has tried everything to quit but as long as he sees his wife smoke, he lives in torture.

It is a valiant, and massive effort to quit, and even with all the quit-smoking aids available, it still required one major element: The Desire to Quit.

I'd suggest you start making incremental rules. No smoking in the office for starters. I don't care what anyone says, you cannot keep the toxins locked in one room in an apartment. They'll cling to your clothes, breath, creep under the door, through the door when you enter and exit...but worst of all, it makes it easy for you.

Start limiting it to the balcony, and at irregular times of day (i.e. if you had one after coffee yesterday, wait an hour after coffee next time. Then two hours, then three...

Next you'll want to make the balcony non-smoking so you have to make the trip down the hall, down the elevator, and outside the front lobby. It'll have three good effects: make you smoke less, make you have to exert yourself to smoke, and keep it away from your loved ones.

If you smoke in the car, make it a rule to stop, get out, and have your smoke (or keep driving).

Once you stop associating smoking with pleasurable things like coffee, internet, travel, etc, it becomes easier to quit.

Oh, and I don't suggest quitting coffee at the same time like someone suggested. Coffee is also a huge addiction and cold turkey withdrawal effects can confound your attempt to quit.
Take on one monkey at a time.

I went to an NA (narcotics anonymous) meeting (in support of a friend) and I was surprised that almost EVERYONE in the group were also "sanctioned" chain smokers. The irony was these coke/heroin/meth addicts were allowed to smoke cigarettes at will, but smoking a joint was taboo, regarded as a "substitution" drug.

You have enough medical issues to deal with without poisoning yourself to boot. When my neighbour broke his neck due to a fall, he almost died. Not from the fall (although he was out for an evening smoke on the deck at the time), but because his lungs kept collapsing from the ravages of smoking. It cost him about an additional six months of ICU because of the tracheotomy.

Lastly, most teens' first smoke comes from their parents' pack of smokes. Mine sure did! Dad loved it when I'd sit and roll his smokes in the Filtermatic machine, but for every pack I made for him, I made one for me! Good enough for dad, good enough for me...

I think most of us can name one person we know who was touched by cancer from smoking.
Try putting that face on the cigarette pack...(in your head, not literally although if it helps...)

Good luck!

Muz
 
Nuggler
#17
Triedit:

You ken do it ifn you REALLY want to. I'll make you a promise: One year after quitting, if you take up going for just short walks, say, a block a day (as in the old CBC add), you will feel really good. Food will taste better, stamina will be up, sex'l be better (stamina eh), you won't stink, (of smoke), you will be able to BREATHE, non-smokers won't have a gag thing when they enter your house. There. Worth it eh? Plus, you will just overall feel better, and your body will work better.

It takes about 2-3 days (+/-) for the nicotine and all the nasty stuff to leave your system. From there on it's mind over matter. You last for two weeks, and you have it licked.

Don't hang out with smokers
Don't let smokers in the house/car,etc..(the smell will sicken you after a while)
Cut down (way down) on caffeine: coffee, tea, chocolate, etc.
Get to a support group if you really need it.

There; Dr.Uggs method to beat the weed: Free. I usually charge. No OHIP coverage either.

When I quit (was a HEAVY smoker)........then I lost weight.........ker-whap......try the veal!!..........EVERYONE SMOKED. Now, very few do. You can't smoke in stores, restaurants, etc., so it should be EASIER to quit.

Hang in there. We're rootin fer ya. Keep yer stick on the ice.

Seriously,

N'Ugg
 
jimmoyer
#18
In 3 days it will be one year of no smoking for me.
I took hypnosis last year on the night of July 12.

Looking back that hypnosis provided a sort of calm to get over the hump.

I also changed two other habits that feed on this.

The trifecta, the hat trick is this and they all feed on each other beneficially:

1. Quit smoking.
2. change your eating habits. That's a big one. Because that involves subtle addictions.
3. excercise. That can give you a buzz you're missing.

My hypnosis occured with 60 other people in a cheap hotel room. He told us to close our eyes. He played cheap ethereal music. Told us "NO MORE no more NO MORE no more" over and over again. He told us the harm it causes, the stink, the smell of death. NO MORE NO MORE no more.

Then he snapped his fingers 3 times. Why 3 times ? Because it's campy. Because its the tradition of childhood cartoons.

He asked us how long we think he's been talking to us.

All of us said 10 to 15 minutes. Look at your watch. It was over an hour and a half he was talking. He said, there's no magic. Just closing your eyes takes away your sense of time.

Then he told us to go home and brush our teeth. And to change the toothbrush at least each week because it contains nictone and dirt in the bristles. He told us to take a bath. The nictone will come out of your pores and will make your bath towel brown while you take this mint leaf to chew on.

ANYWAY...

If you've ever driven a long commute and suddenly you're home without noticing things on the way, then you've experienced the hypnagogic state.

ANYWAY...


No continuing smoker will understand it until AFTER they quit.

It's the kind of knowlege that seems boringly prosaic but AFTER QUITTING, it's a downright epiphany.

By the way I don't believe in will power if you define it as the power to deny what you want. I find other tricks such as looking forward to your new life style, looking forward to eating whole foods and discovering new fruits etc, and excercising to get that buzz you crave is much better than living a will power of denial.



The River Styxx.
Last edited by jimmoyer; Jul 9th, 2007 at 09:02 AM..
 
Curiosity
#19
I think people who can overcome such a bitch of an addiction should be awarded medals... it's not an easy task - and to make it worse it is still acceptable as a legal fix....blends in with lifestyle....in some cultures - very glamorous or attractive - and it has a benefit of weight control too...

Good on anyone who is trying or has tried or won the battle....

I hope at the end of a frustratingly long journey of your battle with the little white stick....you gave yourself a party!! As much as you wanted it to be... it was never
your good friend and companion.... never.
 
Impetus
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by jimmoyerView Post

I
ANYWAY...

If you've ever driven a long commute and suddenly you're home without noticing things on the way, then you've experienced the hypnagogic state.

Sounds like you saw Sailesh, the Unadultrated Hypnotist!

We've seen him perform a couple of times (fun watching people have sex with their chairs on the stage) and my wife bought a CD to help her sleep.

Has the opposite effect on me...

Muz
 
jimmoyer
#21
LOL ....

What attracted me to hypnosis is that it's different from the much hallowed WILL POWER or the rightly admired sequential rational logic.

WILL POWER is a myth, if you define it as the bullish power to deny yourself pleasure constantly.
To deny yourself your desires day after day after day is a plan to fail. It's a much admired characteristic probably because it is just about impossible to do.

Does it take WILL POWER to embrace something you like ? Something you look forward to ?
There's the trick.

And our belief that we are rational creatures making rational shopping decisions, making rational voting decisions is mere chimera.

We are emotional first, then we look quickly for the sequential logic to excuse it.

This all relates to quitting smoking.

Think about it.
 
daisygirl
#22
I quit 5 1/2 years ago by using the patch and Zyban together. I had tried so many other times without success. I do cheat about once a year and have a cigarette but I hope that will eventually stop. I am really happy that during times of extreme stress, I haven't had the urge to return to cigarettes. My urge is usually when I see the commercials for the Nicorette gum...so I wish they would ban those dang commercials.

The one huge difference I also had when I actually did quit was my husband. He would tell me things like how great my hair smelled. It was so nice to hear the compliments that it just gave me that extra incentive.

I agree with what Muz had to say. Stop smoking indoors. Then cut out a favourite cigarette, whether it is after dinner or whenever. After a couple of days, cut out another favourite cigarette. Then start making it so that you have to inconvenience yourself to have one. Don't try to do this overnight, especially since you enjoy smoking. Do it one at a time, one day at a time.

BTW, I tried the patch by itself, but I was only successful with the first two strengths. When I got to the weakest strength, I wanted to smoke again.

As for the suckers, make sure they are sugar free or they will rot your teeth. You might want to try something else instead. (I always liked carrots.)
 
Curiosity
#23
Wouldn't life be a buzz if it was really like all of our comfortable addictions? Who the heck designed this business of living anyway eh? Making all of our toys bad for us?
 
Unforgiven
#24
It's a poor craftsman who blames his tools.

Quote: Originally Posted by CuriosityView Post

Wouldn't life be a buzz if it was really like all of our comfortable addictions? Who the heck designed this business of living anyway eh? Making all of our toys bad for us?

 
Curiosity
#25
Unforgiven

Good morning... yup yer right.... still....it makes me grumpy ... but I guess if it was good for us we'd probably not like it.... hmmm hate chocolate? Never.
 
jimmoyer
#26
Then cut out a favourite cigarette, whether it is after dinner or whenever. After a couple of days, cut out another favourite cigarette. Then start making it so that you have to inconvenience yourself to have one. Don't try to do this overnight, especially since you enjoy smoking. Do it one at a time, one day at a time.
-------------------------------------Daisygirl----------------------------------------------------------------------

I believed in that method. The countdown. One less cig a day. I always failed at it, but I believed that was a good method.

Ultimately I succeeded by stopping completely instead.

Read the following and see what you think:





Quitting by Gradual Withdrawal





Quitting by the gradual withdrawal method. I discuss this method quite extensively in my seminars. I always tell how if there is anyone attending who knows a smoker who they really despise they should actively encourage them to follow the gradual withdrawal "cut down" approach. They should call them up every day and tell them to just get rid of one cigarette. Meaning, if they usually smoke 40 a day, just smoke 39 on the first day of the attempt to quit. The next day they should be encouraged to smoke only 38 then 37 the next day and so on. Then the seminar participant should call these people every day to congratulate them and encourage them to continue. I must reemphasize, this should only be done to a smoker you really despise.

You see, most smokers will agree to this approach. It sounds so easy to just smoke one less each day. Thirty-nine cigarettes to a two pack a day smoker seems like nothing. The trick is to convince the person that you are only trying to help them. For the first week or two the one downside is you have to pretend to like the person and you have to talk to them every day. They wonít whine too bad either. When they are down to 30 from 40, they may start to complain a little. You really wonít be having fun yet. When the payoff comes is about three weeks into the scam. Now you've got them to less than half their normal amount. They are in moderate withdrawal all the time.

A month into the approach youíve got them into pretty major withdrawal. But be persistent. Call them and tell them how great they are doing and how proud you are of them. When they are in their 35th to 39th day, you have pulled off a major coup. This poor person is in peak withdrawal, suffering miserably and having absolutely nothing to show for it. They are no closer to ending withdrawal than the day you started the process. They are in chronic withdrawal, not treating him or herself to one or two a day, but actually depriving him or herself of 35 to 40 per day.

If you want to go in for the kill, when you have them down to zero, tell them donít worry if things get tough, just take a puff every once in a while. If you can get them to fall for this, taking one puff every third day, they will remain in withdrawal forever. Did I mention you really should despise this person to do this to them? It is probably the cruelest practical joke that you could ever pull on anyone. You will undercut their chance to quit, make them suffer immeasurably and likely they will at some point throw in the towel, return to smoking, have such fear of quitting because of what they went through cutting down, that they will continue to smoke until it kills them. Like I said, you better really despise this person.

Hopefully there is no one you despise that much to do this to them. I hope nobody despises themselves enough to do this to themselves. Quitting cold turkey may be hard but quitting by this withdrawal technique is virtually impossible. If you have a choice between hard and impossible, go for hard. You will have something to show at the end of a hard process, but nothing but misery at the end of an impossible approach. Quit cold and in 72 hours it eases up. Cut down and it will basically get progressively worse for weeks, months, or years if you let it. I should mention, this is not a new technique.

It has been around for decades. Talk to every long-term ex-smoker you know.

Try to find one person who successfully used the cut down approach, gradually reducing to eventual zero over weeks or months. You will be hard pressed to find even one person who fits this bill. One other perspective that should help you see the flaw in the approach. Look at people here who had once quit for months or years and then relapsed. One day, after such a long time period, they take a drag and are smoking again. If one puff can do this after years or decades, guess what it will do after days or hours of being smoke free. It puts the smoker back to square one. All that any ex-smoker has to do to avoid relapse or chronic withdrawal is to - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

 
Impetus
#27
Well, I agree that cold turkey is the best approach, but using patches etc are similar to the gradual withdrawal method in my opinion.

I think there are two aspects to cigarette smoking, the nicotine addiction and the smoking habit.

It's best to derail the smoking habit first, i.e. those "trigger" cigarettes with morning coffee, after a meal, before bedtime, the drive to work, etc.
Break those habits first, then go cold turkey.

I smoked a pack a day from age 14 and quit cold turkey around 21 years old when I started vocal coaching because my coach wouldn't take me as a student if I smoked. I had incentive, and health was the last thing on my mind. Unfortunately, I subsequently spent another 20-odd years playing in smokey bars until the blessed smoking ban, which was a dual-edged sword making the workplace more healthy and less smelly, but contributing to the decline of the club scene...(along with the internet, home theatre, RIDE, and general cost of living increases). But I never smoked another cigarette.

Muz
 
smilingfish
#28
Not smoking during pregnancy doesn't count, because your body just doesn't want to do it.
Live/work with non-smokers(move to another place, leave your family and get a new job...).
Put horrible pictures/ statuesthat can warn you about the harm smoking can do to you, everywhere in your house and your workplace.
Oh, you're not supposed to write this online diary of quitting smoking. This just reminds you of smoking.
 
jimmoyer
#29
whyquit.com/joel/Joel_03_03_one_day_time.html (external - login to view)

This guy says it better than I can...



Take it ONE DAY AT A TIME





This concept is taught by almost all programs which are devoted to dealing with substance abuse or emotional conflict of any kind. The reason that it is so often quoted is that it is universally applicable to almost any traumatic situation.
Dealing with quitting smoking is no exception. Along with NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!, ONE DAY AT A TIME is the key technique which gives the smoker the strength to successfully quit smoking and stay free from the powerful grip of nicotine dependence.
When first quitting, the concept of ONE DAY AT A TIME is clearly superior to the smoker thinking that he will never smoke again for the rest of his life.

For when the smoker is first giving up smoking, he does not know whether or not he wants to go the rest of his life without smoking.
Most of the time the smoker envisions life as a non-smoker as more stressful, painful, and less fun.
It is not until he quits smoking that he realizes his prior thoughts of what life is like as a non-smoker were wrong.

Once he quits he realizes that there is life after smoking. It is a cleaner, calmer, fuller and, most important, healthier life.

Now the thought of returning to smoking becomes a repulsive concept. Even though the fears have reversed, the ONE DAY AT A TIME technique should still be maintained.
Now, as an ex-smoker, he still has bad moments every now and then. Sometimes due to stress at home or work, or pleasant social situations, or to some other indefinable trigger situation, the desire for a cigarette surfaces. All he needs to do is say to himself, I won't smoke for the rest of today; tomorrow I will worry about tomorrow. The urge will be over in seconds, and the next day he probably won't even think of a cigarette.
But ONE DAY AT A TIME should not only be practiced when an urge is present.
It should be practiced daily. Sometimes an ex-smoker thinks it is no longer important to think in these terms. He goes on with the idea he will not smoke again for the rest of his life. Assuming he is correct, when does he pat himself on the back for achieving his goal? When he is lying on his deathbed he can enthusiastically proclaim, "I never smoked again." What a great time for positive reinforcement.
Every day the ex-smoker should wake up thinking that he is not going to smoke that day. And every night before he goes to sleep he should congratulate himself for sticking to his goal.
Because pride is important in staying free from cigarettes.
Not only is it important, but it is well deserved. For anyone who has quit smoking has broken free from a very powerful addiction. For the first time in years, he has gained control over his life, rather than being controlled by his cigarette. For this, he should be proud.
So tonight, when you go to sleep, pat yourself on the back and say, "Another day without smoking, I feel great." And tomorrow when you wake up, say, "I am going to try for another day. Tomorrow I will deal with tomorrow." To successfully stay free from smoking, TAKE IT ONE DAY AT A TIME and - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
 
RomSpaceKnight
#30
I was off the smokes for a year after my heart attack. Just after getting a clean bill of health from cardiac docs I started again. My job sucks and there are some here who I hate vehemently for engaging in criminal activity and the corporate types won't listen. The stress that potential whistle blowers go through is immense.
 

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