Why do we need to send all that money to Afghanistan


temperance
#1
I was looking at the new government of Canada page ---it shows Mr .H with protecting Canadians and rebuilding Afghanistan ---------how does that correlate ?--don't we have are own problems to address --there's poverty and crap going on here, we cant be saving others without saving us first ??/
Check out this crap --I'm ashamed I voted Con ---jobs(manufacturing /tech ) being lost to other counrties being replaced with service jobs that pay half www.pm.gc.ca/eng/media_galler...egory_typ_id=3 (external - login to view)

And I looked at the same site two days ago the enviroment block wasnt there ??? now its first !!
 
Sean D
#2
We do have to help rebuild Afghanistan, our poor do not even get close to how poor theirs are. Helping them will also help in stablizing the world. This is not to say they we should abandon our own people in need just that we have to look past our borders.

As for the jobs leaving Canada, that we can blame on ourselves, we demand cost for everything be cheap. Now if that means hershey move to Mexico and hire cheap child labours so be it. I do not see Canadians saying "hold on there... I am going to refuse to by hershey bars". I for one am not going to buy hershey products anymore, out of principle,not that I think that will change their mind....
Last edited by Sean D; Feb 28th, 2007 at 09:05 AM..
 
missile
#3
Shame on you for being hooked on American Hershey bars! Nobody eats that crap down here,[ except the shoppers who buy all their candy at the dollar stores[ and like the taste of stale candy bars!]. Anway, Hershey.Pa. is a company town and last I heard, was still making all their product there and has no intention of "going to Mexico" P.S. all the money we send to Afghanistan will not save one Canadian soldiers life.
 
mabudon
#4
Your Hershey news must be kinda old, recent headlines describe EXACTLY what you think is NOT happening (not being smart here, it's true)

I really hope that the current admin gest taken to task for all the money that (eventually) will have been wasted in Afghanistan- I find it odd that wasting money is a purely Liberal thing according to many conservative types here, while here we are throwing tons of cash and more than enough actual human lives right in the garbage...

Wasting money is alright when it's been propped up as "noble" but I doubt that the waste of life in Afghanistan will be termed as such in the future
 
Sean D
#5
Well, Hershey moving to Mexico has been widely reported in Ontario
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...224?hub=Canada

When did I say that spending money to help rebuild Afghanistan would save Canadian soldiers?
 
missile
#6
I was thinking of all the monies Russia used to build infrastructure in Afghanistan, and how they were treated for their efforts. We're there now; just another invader to repelled.
 
Sean D
#7
The difference, I think, is that Russia was an enemy to all Afghans, we are enemies just to the extremist.
 
missile
#8
I don't recall getting the invitation to go there: lost in the mail perhaps? If we are going to be invaders,we should have picked an easier nation to do it in--Monaco,perhaps?
 
mabudon
#9
So, only folks who have lost people and livlihoods and property and security due to our actions and those of our allies are mad at us??
Maybe we should just forget it ever happened
 
Sean D
#10
Invaders... what a joke!
This country supported the people that attacked one of our allies... being a Nato member we went to the defence of our ally. I sure hope we would have support if we were ever attacked.

Now we are tring to prevent the people that were in control of Afgan from coming back, and helping the people Afghanistan stand ontheir own... pretty noble I think
 
Sean D
#11
Our actions... of course the actions of the taliban are never brought up when that is mentioned
 
L Gilbert
#12
It's always easier for people to wander into someone else's back yard to tell them their back yard is broken and needs fixing just so we can divert attention from our own back yard. I'm not that pleased that Canada is there and doesn't seem to be doing much to help itself, but I don't think we should get in the habit of starting to do things and then ducking out partways into it.
 
Sean D
#13
I have to disagree, I believe our soldiers are doing good there, but of course we only hear of the combat part of it, which is needed if the gains made are to continue
 
L Gilbert
#14
I'm not saying that we aren't doing good there, just saying that we could be doing more good here with the money, but aren't.
 
Sean D
#15
Point made... but do we not have an international obligation??
 
Sparrow
#16
We do have an international obligation but I disagree with the method.

http://www.afghangovernment.com/briefhistory.htm

This is a little long but It explains my idea why I think we will not succeed. These people have been in conflicts for hundreds of years and have never really governed themselves. If you read the last sentence of the 7th. paragraph it says "for Afghans it meant little that their lives were now be uprooted and destroyed by ethnic kin, AS OPPOSED TO FOREIGN INVADORS". They do not want outsiders on their lands. Some will say NATO was invited by the government, a US friendly government not one of the people. Also British soldiers are there do you really think that after the games they played with Russia in Afghanistan they people will welcome them with open arms? The CIA supplied billions of dollars of arms to the Mujahadeen they even supplied them with anti-aircraft and anti-tank missles. After the Russians were ousted the US lost interest and the country returned to a war of warlords.

I realize that we had to go in with guns to fight the Taliban. NATO was invited. Did anyone think of finding what the people want? It is good to build schools and medical services but first of all these people need to eat. Their poppy fields are being destroyed, that is the only way they can make money to feed their families! In the meantime our drug companies are complaining they do not have enough opiates to make pain killers. Why not create something like an Opiate Board that would sell this opium to licensed companies for the farmers? We do it with out wheat and may other products. But no their livelyhood is taken away. If this was done they might be able to work their field, with our help and knowledge of agriculture, to grow food. If this is not done, as soon as we are gone they will revert back to their old ways, poppy fields and Taliban.

We are there to do a job we should do it completely not half ***. Our sons are dying let it not be in vein.
 
Sparrow
#17
Forgot to mention that Afghanistan history is very similar to Vietnam. They lived through hundreds of years of wars, conquers and warlords. The people of both countries do not like outsiders and they will put up with all kinds of misery as long as it is from their own kind.
 
L Gilbert
#18
Betcha that attitude changes now that some women have had a taste of sun on their bodies, and chances for education, etc.
 
Zzarchov
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by missileView Post

I don't recall getting the invitation to go there: lost in the mail perhaps? If we are going to be invaders,we should have picked an easier nation to do it in--Monaco,perhaps?


Actually I do recall the invitation.

Lets remember folks, the Taliban were not afghanistan. They were one faction in a civil war fighting over afghanistan. The other faction, the Northern Alliance, DID invite us in.

And in former Alliance lands things are far far safer for coalition troops than in Taliban lands.


So yes, we were invited into Afghanistan, by the government in Exhile, and one of the two major factions fighting for the country.

One call also argue that throwing a rock at the sleeping giant is a defacto invite.
 
darkbeaver
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by ZzarchovView Post

Actually I do recall the invitation.

Lets remember folks, the Taliban were not afghanistan. They were one faction in a civil war fighting over afghanistan. The other faction, the Northern Alliance, DID invite us in.

And in former Alliance lands things are far far safer for coalition troops than in Taliban lands.


So yes, we were invited into Afghanistan, by the government in Exhile, and one of the two major factions fighting for the country.

One call also argue that throwing a rock at the sleeping giant is a defacto invite.

Parrot talk like this "throwing a rock at a sleeping giant" may satisfy parrots, but it explains nothing.
 
Zzarchov
#21
I'd say it does.

Don't pick a fight you can't finish. Thats not parrot talk, thats reasoning squirrels understand.

If you go to America, and blow something up, you have invited them to go to your home and blow something up.

If I go to a biker bar, and throw a rock at one of them, I have just invited them to beat me senseless. I deliberately undertook an action knowing the result would be unpleasant.

I find it humourous your fascination with using the very "parrot talk" you despise. Calling something "parrot talk" is an example of this "parrot talk".
 
Sparrow
#22
In Depth

Afghanistan

Is the country collapsing?

Experts call for strategy rethink

Last Updated February 15, 2007

CBC News

Quote
Basically the U.S. and other coalition countries came in after 9/11, bombed the Taliban out of power and promised to rebuild to give people a new Afghanistan. Instead, they just gave them the old one: drugs, warlords, crime and all the factors that gave rise to the Taliban in the 1990s," Rashid said from his home in Lahore, Pakistan.
"People expected nation-building but instead they got NATO, corruption and a Taliban insurgency."
Winning Afghans' trust

For Kathy Gannon, a Canadian journalist and author of the Afghanistan memoir I Is for Infidel, the problem begins and ends with the government put in place in Kabul after U.S.-led forces toppled the Taliban.
"Ask any Afghan," she says, "they'll tell you they can't trust the police, they can't trust officials, they can't trust provincial governors. Therefore, they can't trust the international community that supports all of this."
An opium poppy crop that accounts for more than half of the country's economy is partly to blame for corruption, Gannon says, but so is the international community the United States, Britain, Canada and other donors who have clout in Kabul but don't take advantage of it.
"Until we win back the trust of Afghans," she said, "all the money and all the military action in the world isn't going to make a difference."
End Quote

Basically the U.S. and other coalition countries came in after 9/11, bombed the Taliban out of power and promised to rebuild to give people a new Afghanistan. Instead, they just gave them the old one: drugs, warlords, crime and all the factors that gave rise to the Taliban in the 1990s," Rashid said from his home in Lahore, Pakistan.
"People expected nation-building but instead they got NATO, corruption and a Taliban insurgency."
Winning Afghans' trust

For Kathy Gannon, a Canadian journalist and author of the Afghanistan memoir I Is for Infidel, the problem begins and ends with the government put in place in Kabul after U.S.-led forces toppled the Taliban.
"Ask any Afghan," she says, "they'll tell you they can't trust the police, they can't trust officials, they can't trust provincial governors. Therefore, they can't trust the international community that supports all of this."
An opium poppy crop that accounts for more than half of the country's economy is partly to blame for corruption, Gannon says, but so is the international community the United States, Britain, Canada and other donors who have clout in Kabul but don't take advantage of it.
"Until we win back the trust of Afghans," she said, "all the money and all the military action in the world isn't going to make a difference."

Basically the U.S. and other coalition countries came in after 9/11, bombed the Taliban out of power and promised to rebuild to give people a new Afghanistan. Instead, they just gave them the old one: drugs, warlords, crime and all the factors that gave rise to the Taliban in the 1990s," Rashid said from his home in Lahore, Pakistan.
"People expected nation-building but instead they got NATO, corruption and a Taliban insurgency."
Winning Afghans' trust

For Kathy Gannon, a Canadian journalist and author of the Afghanistan memoir I Is for Infidel, the problem begins and ends with the government put in place in Kabul after U.S.-led forces toppled the Taliban.
"Ask any Afghan," she says, "they'll tell you they can't trust the police, they can't trust officials, they can't trust provincial governors. Therefore, they can't trust the international community that supports all of this."
An opium poppy crop that accounts for more than half of the country's economy is partly to blame for corruption, Gannon says, but so is the international community the United States, Britain, Canada and other donors who have clout in Kabul but don't take advantage of it.
"Until we win back the trust of Afghans," she said, "all the money and all the military action in the world isn't going to make a difference."

Basically the U.S. and other coalition countries came in after 9/11, bombed the Taliban out of power and promised to rebuild to give people a new Afghanistan. Instead, they just gave them the old one: drugs, warlords, crime and all the factors that gave rise to the Taliban in the 1990s," Rashid said from his home in Lahore, Pakistan.
End Quote

This is exactly my point of view and if I can get the link to the actual report it mentiones that just destroying the poppy field will not work.
 
Sparrow
#23
I had trouble getting the link

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/af...y-rethink.html
 

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