The Sickness of Canadian Anti-Americanism


I think not
#1
By Jamie Glazov (external - login to view)
FrontPageMagazine.com | March 7, 2003




Canadian anti-Americanism has always been a perfect reflection of the pathological nature of anti-Americanism as a whole (external - login to view). Indeed, in Canada, where I am a citizen and have grown up most of my life, anti-Americanism has literally defined the national identity and culture of this country – and in the most repulsive and embarrassing ways.

Today, Canadian anti-Americanism is preventing our present Liberal government from giving full-hearted support to the U.S. against Saddam Hussein. The Canadian leadership would rather exhibit its “independence” of the Americans than to confront a brutal dictator who equals Hitler, Stalin, Mao and Pol Pot in their monstrosity.

This reality explains why Mark Kingwell’s recent column “What distinguishes us from Americans,” in Canada’s national newspaper, the National Post, infuriated me as immensely as it did.

Kingwell defends the reality that much of Canadian identity has been built on Canada defining itself in opposition to the United States. He writes, “I have never understood why this is considered inadequate or feeble. If you were the only dissenter in a room holding a dozen people, standing up and saying `I’m not the same as you’ would be a clear mark of moral courage.”

Really?

Suppose this scenario occurs during the Second World War and the other eleven people want to stop Hitler in his tracks and to prevent the Nazification of the world and the mass genocide of Jews. Would exhibiting your “independence” for the sake of fulfilling your little-brother complex be a mark of “moral courage”?

Many Canadian nationalists think so.

The analogy I use above perfectly suits the embarrassing and immoral behaviour of Canadian nationalists throughout the Cold War, especially under the leadership of Pierre Trudeau (external - login to view), when anti-Americanism was seen as being more cutting-edge than confronting and fighting the genocidal Soviet regime.

This psychic illness is founded on Canada’s desperate desire to be “different” than the Americans -- a result of Canada being built on the “counter-revolution.” When the British colonies revolted against their masters in 1776, Canadians became the first anti-Americans. Canada is based on anti-Americanism. Without anti-Americanism -- as one author has quipped -- Canada would cease to exist.
While Kingwell conspicuously avoids the issue of how bearing the mark of “moral courage” translated into many Canadian nationalists engaging in Gulag denial (external - login to view) during the Cold War, the historical record stands firmly in place: the Soviet regime was an expansionist and totalitarian regime that exterminated millions of its own people. (external - login to view) Consequently, as the de-classified documents from the Soviet archives now prove, the Canadian nationalists who demonized the United States, and exonerated the Soviet Union, in the Cold War, for the sake of anti-Americanism, were completely wrong.

Yet no apologies are forthcoming.

But at least we now understand why Canadian “nationalist” writers and historians, such as John Warnock, Donald Creighton, and James Minifie, wrote interpretations and histories about the Cold War that demonized the U.S. and left names such as Joseph Stalin in the footnotes.

As a Russian émigré, I am not humoured by Kingwell’s assault on historical memory; I am not humoured by Gulag denial just as a Jewish person wouldn’t be humoured by Holocaust denial.
While I was engaged in my doctoral studies in history at York University in Toronto, I would confront many of my colleagues about this issue. Why, I asked them, were they reluctant to face the errors of Canadian nationalists vis-à-vis the Cold War? Were they not aware of how the documents from the former Soviet archives were discrediting almost everything Canadian nationalists had said about the Cold War? My colleagues’ favourite response was to shrug their shoulders and to dismiss my arguments as being too “hung up” on “the past.” The Cold War “was over,” they told me, and it was silly to chase down “old ghosts”. My “obsession” with the Soviet archives, they patiently explained to me, was analogous to “necrophilia.” And these were historians.

The only historical necrophilia they supported, it seems, was the variety that found more sins of American foreign policy and capitalism -- not of socialism.

Kingwell thinks it is a badge of “moral courage” to stand up to the Americans. How about during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962, when Prime Minister John Diefenbaker refused to put Canadian forces on an increased level of alert (Defcon 3) in order to show that he wouldn’t be “pushed around” by President John Kennedy? Since Canada had a bilateral defence alliance with the United States for the defence of the North American continent, Diefenbaker’s inaction left an enormous gap in continental defence.

There is nothing “moral” about Canadian anti-Americanism. And nothing logical either. I have always found it humorous how Canadians look down at Americans for loving themselves “too much”, but how they simultaneously swell with a distorted form of patriotic pride at being unlike and better than Americans. Canadian nationalists also always pride themselves on their politically-correct tolerance and "multi-culturalism" while engaging in anti-Americanism -- a disposition, as sociologist Paul Hollander has demonstrated, that is directly related with racism, sexism, and anti-Semitism.
In Canada, of course, it has always been legitimate to be a bigot, as long as it involves hating Americans.

Kingwell refers to how little Americans know about us. He explains that “American ignorance is a staple of our richly ironic strain of humour.” Really? I never found anything slightly “rich” in this humour at all. Growing up in Canada, I was always greatly entertained by the endless and smug complaining about how "stupid" Americans are because of their ignorance about Canada. Let’s be serious: why would Americans in Los Angeles and New York City need to know anything about Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, or about anything else Canadian?

Kingwell ends his essay by saying that Canadians sometimes wish the U.S. “had a little more of what makes us great.” Uh, sorry, but a little bit more of what exactly? Perhaps, instead, it would be wiser for us to focus on giving up on clinging to the ingredients of our “moral courage”, which includes the joke of bilingualism – English Canada’s last pretence of possessing any unique characteristics whatsoever. Let’s admit it, without bilingualism, English Canadians would no longer be able to say, "We’re not like those Americans," without someone else rejoining: "Oh? And how is that?" And there will be no answer, because there will be nothing to say.

If we just manage to get over our little brother complex, then maybe we will also one day no longer have to victimize ourselves with those torturous and emotionally-excruciating conversations about Margaret Atwood and Pierre Berton, in which so many Canadians attempt to show their un-American stripes by discussing novels that no human being outside of Canada has ever heard of, nor would ever read under sane circumstances. And we would also be liberated from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, an entity that it takes masochism to tune into, and that wouldn’t survive five minutes if its life depended on the tastes and desires of Canadians themselves.

Indeed, if we purged ourselves of Kingwell’s mark of "moral courage", Canada’s celebration of mediocrity and, more importantly, its exoneration of evil regimes and mass murderers around the world, would finally come to its long-awaited conclusion.

www.frontpagemag.com/Articles...le.asp?ID=6535 (external - login to view)
 
Tonington
#2
What I've always found about the anti-Americanism here in Canada is that the people who predominantly make up that group are looking for someone to vent against. Rather than reflect on the problems here, it's easier and more patriotic to focus on the Americans. Sure we all get upset at our own government, but some choose to direct some of that outrage on the Yanks. It's funny in particular with some issues like the new media darling climate change. Blame the Americans while here in Canada our emissions actually are rising faster. It's so much easier I think for them to deflect and blame it all on USA.

I personally find it stupid.
 
darkbeaver
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

What I've always found about the anti-Americanism here in Canada is that the people who predominantly make up that group are looking for someone to vent against. Rather than reflect on the problems here, it's easier and more patriotic to focus on the Americans. Sure we all get upset at our own government, but some choose to direct some of that outrage on the Yanks. It's funny in particular with some issues like the new media darling climate change. Blame the Americans while here in Canada our emissions actually are rising faster. It's so much easier I think for them to deflect and blame it all on USA.

I personally find it stupid.

Just for the sake of argument lets say the article offers an explanation of Canadian anti-Americanism and leave aside wheather or not it's valid. How would this account for the global disapproval of American imperialism and arrogance. If Canadians disapprove of American policy it does not have to be for the reasons advanced in the article, it could have something to do with independent critical thought. Reflection on many of the domestic problems of Canada often as not lead to American policy and the enormous influence that economy has on Canada.
 
#juan
#4
ITN

This article is garbage. It is really funny that somehow the American military can bomb and kill a million or two civilians in Korea, a million or so in Laos and Cambodia, two or three million in VietNam, for no good reason that I know of, and if any Canadian calls them on it, they are immediately labeled "anti-American". American "Shock and Awe", along with the U.S. driven sanctions, killed over a million Iraqis. Let no Canadian comment on these and other atrocities, or they are slapped with an Anti-American sticker.

After 9/11 Canada took in several hundred airliners and their passengers, who couldn't land in the U.S. The travelers, mostly Americans, after the hotels were full, were taken in to Canadian homes for up to a week. These people became friends with their hosts and those friendships have endured to this day.

The arrogance of power, is a frightening thing. Let's don't listen to jerks like the author that was quoted in this topic.
 
selfactivated
#5
Seems like the author has a sad but valid point to me. A great deal of anti Americanism goes down just on this site. But I have a few questions. Are Canadians against the people of America or are they against the Government. Because in my eyes theyre two different entities.

The part about Americans not knowing Canadian history, well we know even less of Mexican or Brazilian, or Portugal ect ect ect. In school we are taught regional history basic history and thats it. Californians know little of slavery and virginians know little else. So dont feel left out.
 
gopher
+1
#6  Top Rated Post
Canada is based on anti-Americanism. Without anti-Americanism -- as one author has quipped -- Canada would cease to exist.

What an incredibly stupid statement. I cannot believe that anyone can debase themselves in such a manner as to write something this stupid. How moronic must it be for anyone to either say it or believe it.

Canada will cease to exist without hatred for the USA?

Come on, folks. How can anyone sit there and give this idiocy any thought?

Just because the majority of Canadians oppose Bush's stupid war, does this constitute some form of grevious sin as this moronic writer says? The vast MAJORITY of Americans also oppose that stupid war -- what does make us? America haters??? The fact remains that the majority of the world's population, like that of the USA and Canada, ALSO opposes Bush's war. How the hell does that 'prove' the idiotic idea that opposing Bush constitutes hatred for the USA?

I knew many Canadians in my many years in NYC, and there are a great many Canadians here in Minnesota. The vast majority love the USA and report that this is the consensus back in their homes. That's the true picture of Canadian attitude towards the States.

Glasov's article ranks as one of the most stupid writings I have ever seen. I won't address its other incredibly stupid ideas because it's not worth the time to do so. Let's hope that we never see the likes of this worthless and scatological garbage on this forum again.

 
Andem
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by selfactivatedView Post

Seems like the author has a sad but valid point to me. A great deal of anti Americanism goes down just on this site. But I have a few questions. Are Canadians against the people of America or are they against the Government. Because in my eyes theyre two different entities.

The part about Americans not knowing Canadian history, well we know even less of Mexican or Brazilian, or Portugal ect ect ect. In school we are taught regional history basic history and thats it. Californians know little of slavery and virginians know little else. So dont feel left out.

I challenge you to visit ANY other country in the world and find LESS anti-Americanism than Canada. The US is lucky to have Canada as a neighbour. Canada is much less anti-American than any other country I've been to... and I have a lot of miles accumulated and am Super Elite/Star Alliance Gold.

By the way, this article is completely irrelevant. The war in Iraq was years ago and has already proven to be a flop.
 
Dexter Sinister
#8
Yeah, well... bashing the United States has always been popular in Canada. It's a fear reaction, really. When you live next door to a country with 10 times your population, 15 times your economic strength, and infinitely many times your military strength, it's hard to look at that neighbour rationally. All the individual Americans I've ever met personally, with one exception, have been friendly, helpful, interesting, and interested. That one exception was a graduate student I knew at the University of Alberta 35 years ago who was the stereotypical ugly American, a soft fat white guy who hated blacks, Jews, Hispanics, aboriginals, women, anybody who couldn't speak English... His message to all of them, as he bummed a 7th cigarette from me during that conversation--these are his exact words--was "conform or die." Fascist bastard. I hated him, mostly because after meeting him I could no longer say that all the Americans I've met personally have been friendly, helpful, etc.

But he's nobody, and not typical. But the U.S. government, now, that's a completely different question. It's really hard to like the current administration. I see imperialism, fascism, theocracy, arrogance, ignorance, and stupidity there. Good thing U.S. law prevents anyone from having more than two terms as President. Bush has squandered all the good will and support the United States had around the world after 9/11, embroiled his nation in an unwinnable civil war in Iraq, abrogated long-standing treaties and agreements with other nations, fatuously claimed to be anointed by god to lead the free world in this crisis, which he largely created through his own folly and arrogance... makes me queasy.
 
CDNBear
#9
Canadian Liberal Party, very anti American. Reached an impass on soft wood.

Canadian Conservative Party, not anti American. Reached a resolution, albeit, not the very best of, but to quote the many Liberals here that have touted this line about Liberal intiatives...

"At least it was a start"

Anti anything rarely gets you anywhere. You can be sovereign, independant, critical, but the blatant anti American attacks, from certain political party's here in Canada, serve no other purpose then to divide, not define.
 
temperance
#10
Anti Americanism --what !thats ridiculous ,maybe some don't like policies of American government or ways in past Americans were treated by certain groups but I know lots of Canadian s and many policies the government (s ) of Canada that aren't liked either ,

This is a Divide and conquer --

We are different ,yes

Why not focus on solutions in your own Country then criticizing another ,what a waste

We Canadians need to find ways to enrich and be proud of ourselves --instead of picking at someone else's lint
 
CDNBear
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by temperanceView Post

We Canadians need to find ways to enrich and be proud of ourselves --instead of picking at someone else's lint

We Canadians do not need to find ways "to enrich and be proud", they already exist, pick up a history book, not approved for any schools in Canada and ye shall see the rich and proud history, that should define us, not only as a Nation, but as a proud and powerful people, as well.

The Canadian anit US crowd are self loathing, ahistorical know nothings, that not only do not fully grasp the historical significance and contributions of our Nation, globally, but do not fully appreciate their part of it, they are indeed in dire need of a serious history lesson.

The anti US crowd, feel inferior in someway, thus they take it upon themselves to point out the flaws of the minority of Americans, using generalizations and sensationalized sound bites, only to boost their self worth. Yet another failing of the left leaning elitist.
 
temperance
#12
Nothing I was taught in High school prepared me for the truth of Canada and its hardships ,its fears its wicked acts on others

Being a mix of welsh/ Scot and French /native --I had a hard time finding a middle ground to start ,I thought we were a wonderful giving caring nation ,we have hidden negatives and were not or we weren't just pretty peace keepers ---we didn't accept Afro Americans with open arms as I once thought and we definitely didn't let Native peoples of Canada be Natives --60-70 years ago some Canadian in power betrayed Inuit peoples as well
so for me I spent along time coming to terms with my Country ,its past -

-I'm on a positive note now but there are millions who need to enrich (through books and real history ) and them become proud of the changes made
So yes we need to enrich continuously

proudcanadiankids.ca/ (external - login to view)
 
Curiosity
#13
I don't know how people will take this statement without being angry with me...but here goes....

Over the years I have come to realize much anti-Americanism voiced, written, and demonstrated by the people in Canada has become strangely - a unifying force - a togetherness for Canadians to unite together "against" - a patriotic energizing motive for Canadians to feel proud of their nation, to set aside their intra-national provincial scrapes and become a one-nation, working together despite this perceived enemy force to the south.

At the expense of the people in the U.S. Canada has found a way to stay together across the vast landscape, struggling with a paucity of population which could drive that great nation with more momentum.

Wars unify nations and the U.S. has had plenty.... but because Canada is in an anti-war, globalization modality in its development for the future, it is rational to see why Canadians must have something to tie them together in commonality.....even to the point of losing some of their independence by
becoming more European again... which seems rather a step back in time.... but not my decision.

Unfortunately it has become the U.S. which apparently represents many of the philosophies Canada and its government wish to shed in order to preserve their nation in peace and productivity. The various reasons people list as their "dislikes" against the U.S. are almost sad to me, as they cast about for the right words to express and vent against the huge noisy "arrogant" group to the south.

I have no idea if successful accomplishment of goals through imagined "competitive anger" towards a shared border nation is going to work..... too much energy is expended on looking for negatives instead of taking advantage of all the positives Canada stands to gain by sharing with the U.S.

If Canada chooses further separation, focusing future growth east and west across the seas..... my good wishes go along with it.... and the U.S. has lost a long time friend and partner forever.

Still...the U.S. has no aggressive intention toward Canada or Canadians in any way.... but is reviled because it chose another path of development...which is Canada's right too. The U.S. has never expected nor demanded of Canada any more than it has offered to give and share, especially in battle and other matters of the most consequence to a nation trying to exist under a peaceful flag.

NATO exercsises by the U.S. Naval fleet have become a recent cry of "spying trying to take over the northern trading coast" .... the latest fearmongering by the anxiety driven hordes.... when NATO is and has been one of the few successful ventures the military of both nations conduct in tandem.

My constant question over the years has always been: What has the U.S. done to Canada?

The lame answers I get with the problems of trade which are miniscule when compared to the profits and success of the trade we never consider because there are no glitches....takes me by surprise .... because Canadians seem to ignore all of the good the nations share and seek to resurrect the "bad"
over and over with the same old worn out snipe.

The great treck to the south by the snowbirds here often makes me smile because there are no grand press or media stories about how unfaithful the Canadians are - those who seek a bit of sun and escape from the cold and snow.... who spread out like little birds across the southern landscape doing their
part to promote peace and goodwill and discovering how similar everyone is..... friendships to be made for life....another annual exercise in peace which is roundly ignored by the vocalists.

Canadians are proud people, and the defeating identifier which is used more often when Americans seem to be present comes out: We are not Americans...is in fact a most impotent of all statements, the saddest, the most short-sighted, the seeking to blame, and truly un-Canadian.

I am Canadian is sufficient, enough, and the only true and valid statement from a wholly proud people.
Last edited by Curiosity; Feb 4th, 2007 at 08:59 AM..Reason: spelling boos
 
CDNBear
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by CuriosityView Post

I don't know how people will take this statement without being angry with me...but here goes....
Over the years I have come to realize much anti-Americanism voiced, written, and demonstrated by the people in Canada has become strangely - a unifying force - a togetherness for Canadians to unite together "against" - a patriotic energizing motive for Canadians to feel proud of their nation, to set aside their intra-national provincial scrapes and become a one-nation, working together despite this perceived enemy force to the south.
At the expense of the people in the U.S. Canada has found a way to stay together across the vast landscape, struggling with a paucity of population which could drive that great nation with more momentum.
Wars unify nations and the U.S. has had plenty.... but because Canada is in an anti-war, globalization modality in its development for the future, it is rational to see why Canadians must have something to tie them together in commonality.....even to the point of losing some of their independence by
becoming more European again... which seems rather a step back in time.... but not my decision.
Unfortunately it has become the U.S. which apparently represents many of the philosophies Canada and its government wish to shed in order to preserve their nation in peace and productivity. The various reasons people list as their "dislikes" against the U.S. are almost sad to...

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
Last edited by CDNBear; Feb 4th, 2007 at 09:46 AM..
 
darkbeaver
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by selfactivatedView Post

Seems like the author has a sad but valid point to me. A great deal of anti Americanism goes down just on this site. But I have a few questions. Are Canadians against the people of America or are they against the Government. Because in my eyes theyre two different entities.

The part about Americans not knowing Canadian history, well we know even less of Mexican or Brazilian, or Portugal ect ect ect. In school we are taught regional history basic history and thats it. Californians know little of slavery and virginians know little else. So dont feel left out.

Government, of the people, for the people, by the people.
 
TomG
#16
The purpose of being anti is to gain separation. If you are connected to something that injures you, then you must gain separation. If that something persists in its connection, then you must try harder. It is true however, that ‘anti’ without a purpose seems a sickness.

My purpose is having my own life to lead rather than living somebody else’s life. I care for my life, my soul, one in the same, by accepting all the risks that are inherent and unavoidable in life and knowing that it is the risks that I experience which define me. Nothing else has responsibility for my life. My life is the one thing that I truely have, and that thing only desires my experience--what ever comes. My life is safe within my experience what ever that might be. Only I can injure my life, and I can only do that by denying my soul my own experience. I can kill my soul by selling my experience to somebody else in exchange for illusions of protection and gifts unearned. I can kill my soul by living other people’s lives as if they were my own. I could sell my soul to TV but I don’t.

For me to live I need a place that respects me as I respect everything around me. If I can’t find such a place then I must shrink my world until I find my place. To respect my place I must be able to grasp it at an adequate level of detail. And then, my place might become even smaller. I cannot claim the broad world as my place and then grasp it by the abstractions of ideologies. For then, I could not grasp the details required to both offer and receive respect. For all this I need separation and I will be ‘anti' to find and defend my place.

To have found my place I learned to ignore persons who place themselves above others. I also ignored those who spoke of cooperation and fellowship but offer nothing but abuse to those who do not agree with them. Likewise, I ignore those who offer great teachings as a way of placing themselves above others. The best teachers speak from the authority of their age and deeds. A teacher’s age and deeds are best told by others.

I have my place. I am hard at work becoming an expert of a very small place. That is all I want. I am happy. It is my life. I gave up much and risked much in comming to my poor place. I gained much wealth in doing so. I might seek a larger place if I could live responsibly there in respect. That place could be a country. I am seldom tempted. Large places have little respect and much unhappiness. In a large place I would think of myself most of the time.
 
MikeyDB
#17
Scorn and “justified” contempt one more time….


There are many reasons why this article presents both legitimate and less than objectively accurate appraisal.

Perhaps ITN has some reason of his own for efforts to paint first the “left” as ineffectual boobs and now the whole of Canada painted with the broad strokes of “Anti-Americanism”, but in the climate of the moment, whatever that rationale may be, it is in-itself mistrusted by many. It could be regarded as yet another attempt to offer the neocon view of the world with Canada as simply the local focus. Simplistically we could conclude that Canadian reaction to what millions around the world regard as a war (invasion of Iraq), predicated on lies and half-truths confirm the ‘bull-in-a-china shop’ image, which unfortunately many individual American visitors to Canada have left behind. But that in and of itself doesn’t explain the perception, (if we embrace these observations as accurate) in terms of their being a long-standing climate of mistrust, which demands we dig a little deeper.

I’ve been one of the most vocal anti-American contributors and I will accept that label as deserved, albeit with a proviso or condition attached. It should be understood from the on-set that no Canadian owes any American an explanation or an accounting for why they feel a particular way. In fact why should any America really care what a Canadian “feels” about America or Americans?

Is this perhaps another attempt to paint Canadians as yet another “bad-guy” while implying that America and Americans are unjustly regarded as responsible for the many terrible things that are happening to them and their people around the world?

Canadian citizens like American citizens don’t write foreign policy. Our leadership just like the American administration proceeds with governing the nation as a-work-in-process and must respond to economic, national and global circumstances as dynamic continuum, both domestically and internationally.

Americans on one hand maintain their right as a nation to conduct their affairs as an independent entity among nation-states, and yet there is no denying the intimate relationship between in this instance Canada and the United States. Americans have a similar relationship with Mexico, although that relationship is fraught with a conundrum of its own. Illegal immigration into the U.S. from Mexico has always been a concern for Americans. While the general theory/perception of America as independent agent is undoubtedly valid, facts reflect a different reality.

While staunchly defending its right to be regarded as an independent actor, history reveals that a significant component of this ‘independent behavior’ has been military intrusion and economic bullying of dozens of nations around the world. Central America stands as one example where on the strength of various rationales America has contributed to violent insurrection through supplying military materiel to some and withholding support to others. America has elected (through the CIA and direct intervention by the Whitehouse) to orchestrate civil wars and support coups…and practice “regime-change” that were regarded as “necessary” to prevent the spread of communism….to protect American interests…(American business) …to demonstrate support for regimes “friendly” to American commerce and political leanings.

Because the initial contribution to this thread offers the opinion of a single writer as the genesis for this discussion, I’ll follow in kind by presenting the single opinion of another American for consideration.

“It is a law of physics (still on the books when last I looked) that in nature there is no action without reaction. The same appears to be true in human nature - that is, history. In the last six years, two dates are apt to be remembered for longer than usual in the United States of Amnesia: April 19,1995, when a much-decorated infantry soldier called Timothy McVeigh blew up a federal building in Oklahoma City killing 168 innocent men, women, and children. Why? McVeigh told us at eloquent length, but our rulers and their media preferred to depict him as a sadistic, crazed monster…not a good person like the rest of us – who had done it just for kicks.”

“On September 11,2001, Osama bin Laden and his Islamic terrorist organization struck at Manhattan and the Pentagon. The Pentagon Junta in charge of our affairs programmed their president to tell us that bin Laden was an “evildoer” who envied us our goodness and wealth and freedom.”

“None of these explanations made much sense, but our rulers for more than half a century have made sure that we are never to be told the truth about anything that our government has done to other people, not to mention, in McVeigh’s case, our own.”

“All we are left with are the blurred covers of Time and Newsweek where monstrous figures from Hieronymus Bosch stare out at us, hellfire in their eyes, while the New York Times and its chorus of imitators spin complicated stories about mad Osama and cowardly McVeigh, thus convincing most Americans that only a couple of freaks would dare strike at a nation that sees itself as close to perfection as any human society can come.”

“That our ruling junta might have seriously provoked McVeigh (a heartland hero of the Gulf War) and Osama a would-be Muslim Defender of the Faith was never dealt with.”

“Things just happen out there in the American media, and we consumers don’t need to be told the why of anything. Certainly those of us who are in the why-business have a difficult time getting through the corporate-sponsored American media, as I discovered when I tried to explain McVeigh in Vanity Fair or when, since September 11, my attempts to get published have met with failure.”

“Another silenced September voice was that of Arno J. Mayer, professor emeritus of history at Princeton, whose piece entitled “Untimely Reflections” was turned down everywhere in the United States including The Nation, where I have been contributing editor for many years (and where my untimely reflections on September 11 were also turned down).” “Mayer published his piece in the French newspaper Le Monde. He wrote in part:”

“Until now, in modern times, acts of individual terror have been the weapon of the weak and the poor while acts of state and economic terror have been the weapons of the strong. In both types of terror it is, of course, important to distinguish between target and victim. This distinction is crystal clear in the fatal hit on the World Trade Centre: the target is a prominent symbol and hub of globalizing corporate financial and economic power; the victim the hapless and partly subaltern workforce. Such distinction does not apply to the strike on the Pentagon: it houses the supreme military command – the ultima ratio regnum- of capitalist globalization even if it entails, in the Pentagon’s own language, “collateral” damage to human life.”

“In any case, since 1947 America has been the chief and pioneering perpetrator of “pre-emptive” state terror, exclusively in the Third World and therefore widely dissembled. Besides the unexceptional subversion and overthrow of governments in competition with the Soviet Union during the Cold War, Washington has resorted to political assassinations, surrogate death squads and unseemly freedom fighters (e.g. bin Laden). It masterminded the killing of Lumumba and Allende; and it unsuccessfully tried to put to death Castro, Khadafi and Saddam Hussein; and vetoed all efforts to rein in not only Israel’s violation of international agreements and U.S. resolutions but also its practice of pre-emptive state horror.”

Gore Vidal’s book, “Perpetual war for Perpetual peace: How we got to be so Hated” is a short compendium of specific and particular American acts of aggression and econo-imperialism across the face of this planet over the past sixty years, with references to older invasions and actions taking place in the name of “Americanism”.

Within the United States as Gore and Mayer point out, the facts surrounding American interventions and activity are skillfully and artfully prevented from being widely disseminated to the domestic population. While no one can say with absolute assurance that the media of either Canada or the media of other nations around the world enjoy the “corner” on balanced news or presentation it is very clear that Americans are kept in the dark about a great deal that goes on at the will of the American administration as driven by corporate America. The spirit of the First Amendment lives…but has suffered at the machinations of the very Military Industrial Complex that Eisenhower warned his own people of.

I’m not going to play table-tennis with ITN or anyone else on this issue, that would be an exercise in futility since any path to convincing the other is already too obstructed to be regarded as reasonably likely. It does say something about ITN and if I may be so bold as to speculate a good many Americans that in the face of a cascade of exposed lies and fabrications spanning decades that many still believe that America can be trusted.
Not only should Americans distrust their government, non-Americans would be well advised to distrust them as well.





 
hermanntrude
#18
It's possible to disapprove of america's ways without being anti-american. I don't like what's going on in the US at the moment with that dickhead of a president, but i suspect an awful lot of americans feel the same way. I don't have anything against america, any more than anywhere else. people are stupid.
 
MikeyDB
#19
Herman

How do you feel about any consideration of the role of the American electorate in accepting the process and style of government that I would agree with you..is a valid target for anyones criticism?
 
darkbeaver
#20
ITN would deny all of us the right of thought outside the imperial boundry.Very nice piece MickyDB
a brain is a beautiful thing.
 
hermanntrude
#21
well i'd criticise any electorate since their IQ is undoubtedly about 50% below average, which means there are some stupid votes made, based on things like colour of the skin, or the sound of someone's name. And even stupider there are those who don't vote at all. It's a shame that bush got voted in, and whether or not it was rigged (please don't start discussing that again now) it would have been a lot harder to ignore if it had been a clearer vote. I suspect much of the american electorate has learned it's lesson. we'll see i suppose
 
darkbeaver
#22
Last edited by darkbeaver; Feb 4th, 2007 at 12:09 PM..Reason: duplication
 
CDNBear
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by hermanntrudeView Post

well i'd criticise any electorate since their IQ is undoubtedly about 50% below average, which means there are some stupid votes made, based on things like colour of the skin, or the sound of someone's name. And even stupider there are those who don't vote at all. It's a shame that bush got voted in, and whether or not it was rigged (please don't start discussing that again now) it would have been a lot harder to ignore if it had been a clearer vote. I suspect much of the american electorate has learned it's lesson. we'll see i suppose

Why not disciss the possiblity of impropriety in the voting systems?

www.blackboxvoting.org/ (external - login to view)

httpyoutubecomwatchvyj530xW7PLE



I say it was a sham, riggered is an understatement.
 
CDNBear
#24
Or...

forums.canadiancontent.net/in...king+democracy (external - login to view)
 
MikeyDB
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

ITN would deny all of us the right of thought outside the imperial boundry.Very nice piece MickyDB
a brain is a beautiful thing.

Perhaps Beve ...mine's blown up on me three times....
 
darkbeaver
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by CuriosityView Post

I don't know how people will take this statement without being angry with me...but here goes....
Over the years I have come to realize much anti-Americanism voiced, written, and demonstrated by the people in Canada has become strangely - a unifying force - a togetherness for Canadians to unite together "against" - a patriotic energizing motive for Canadians to feel proud of their nation, to set aside their intra-national provincial scrapes and become a one-nation, working together despite this perceived enemy force to the south.
At the expense of the people in the U.S. Canada has found a way to stay together across the vast landscape, struggling with a paucity of population which could drive that great nation with more momentum.
Wars unify nations and the U.S. has had plenty.... but because Canada is in an anti-war, globalization modality in its development for the future, it is rational to see why Canadians must have something to tie them together in commonality.....even to the point of losing some of their independence by
becoming more European again... which seems rather a step back in time.... but not my decision.
Unfortunately it has become the U.S. which apparently represents many of the philosophies Canada and its government wish to shed in order to preserve their nation in peace and productivity. The various reasons people list as their "dislikes" against the U.S. are almost sad to...

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
I'm not angry with you Curiosity, I feel very sad for you though. Wars do not unify nations, they destroy nations. We have nothing to gain by embracing impirialism except the hate and scorn of the world.
 
darkbeaver
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

Canada is based on anti-Americanism. Without anti-Americanism -- as one author has quipped -- Canada would cease to exist.

What an incredibly stupid statement. I cannot believe that anyone can debase themselves in such a manner as to write something this stupid. How moronic must it be for anyone to either say it or believe it.

Canada will cease to exist without hatred for the USA?

Come on, folks. How can anyone sit there and give this idiocy any thought?

Just because the majority of Canadians oppose Bush's stupid war, does this constitute some form of grevious sin as this moronic writer says? The vast MAJORITY of Americans also oppose that stupid war -- what does make us? America haters??? The fact remains that the majority of the world's population, like that of the USA and Canada, ALSO opposes Bush's war. How the hell does that 'prove' the idiotic idea that opposing Bush constitutes hatred for the USA?

I knew many Canadians in my many years in NYC, and there are a great many Canadians here in Minnesota. The vast majority love the USA and report that this is the consensus back in their homes. That's the true picture of Canadian attitude towards the States.

Glasov's article ranks as one of the most stupid writings I have ever seen. I won't address its other incredibly stupid ideas because it's not worth the time to do so. Let's hope that we never see the likes of this worthless and scatological garbage on this forum again.

It"s a sad fact Gopher, Americans are against this destruction I know it and you know it, but still it's going to happen. It truely is an example of the gutless yellow quizzling journalism more and more traded as wisdom.
 
darkbeaver
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by MikeyDBView Post

Perhaps Beve ...mine's blown up on me three times....

I'm still trying to grow one, look over there in the jug in the corner.
 
look3467
#29
If we considered countries to be as like religious beliefs, then there are no differences in thoughts about each others governments.
There are prejudices on both sides.
What would unite the countries is the thoughts concerning our children. What can we build for them so that they would not be like us, but a better people.

We are selfish when we think of our own good and not the good of the future generations.

What can we do to improve the present situation, to where it will be conducive to the unity and peace of our children, children's children?

I am an American, and even though I have some things I don't like, I still support it for here is where I was placed in.

I will first use the attributes instilled in me by God, and then attribute those to my daily living, and to my government.

I will stand up for what I feel is right, and if need be, fight to make changes through legislation for the betterment of my country.

We are neighbors and should see others as brothers or sisters, depending on point of view.

I have never been to Canada, and I am sure that I would find wonderful, God fearing, kind people there whose hearts are not selfish .

There will always be exceptions.

Peace from an Hispanic American>>>AJ
 
Curiosity
#30
Beaver

You feel sorry for me?

I'd rather eat glass than think as you do.

Wars do unify nations - when the great depression was upon the U.S. and they were called to fight
Europe and Japan the country immediately came together in a common cause. Both World Wars united the U.S. as it had never been joined before.

There was no bickering sitting around the beer bottles talking of left and right... people were happy to help in the cause the country chose to enter (late albeit as many Canadians will remind us)....

Then the flower children descended upon the nation - these are not patriotic people and are usually so stoned they have no affiliation other than to their own narcisstic needs ..... and during VietNam the "I hate war" became their stupid mantra while our nation donated tens of thousands of lives evermore changed or lost for the war.....They see war as some Hollywood setting where the "good guys" win and the "bad guys are slaughtered"... that is as shallow as one can get...these anti-war creeps who know nothing except where their next hit is coming from.

Iraq has become a second VietNam and we see again those non-patriots chanting their silly messages....caring only for themselves and their lives of comfort.

These are the people who will bring the U.S. to its knees....the lotus children who expect much and contribute nothing.

What have you done for any of your people Beaver? For your country? For your town? Other than sit on a computer and gripe against your nation... well done.

So far I've given eight relatives in WWII, my husband, my uncle, my nephew and my two stepsons..... anything else?
Last edited by Curiosity; Feb 4th, 2007 at 01:29 PM..
 

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