Greatest Canadian Inventions.


karrie
#1
We asked you to compare the BlackBerry with the electric oven, life saving Insulin with artery clogging poutine, the caulking gun with the Wonderbra. Here are your rankings:
  1. Insulin, Treatment for Diabetes [1921, Frederick Banting, Charles Best]
  2. Telephone [1876, Alexander Graham Bell]
  3. Light Bulb [1874, Henry Woodward, Mathew Evans]
  4. Five Pin Bowling [1908, Thomas F. Ryan]
  5. Wonderbra [1964, Louise Poirier]
  6. Pacemaker [1950, John Hopps, Wilfred Bigelow, John Callaghan]
  7. Robertson Screw, 1908 [Peter Robertson]
  8. Zipper [1913, Gideon Sundback]
  9. Electric Wheelchair [1952, George Klein]
  10. Poutine [1957, Fernand Lachance]
  11. Cobalt-60 “Bomb” Cancer Treatment [1951, Harold Johns]
  12. Java Programming Language [1994, James Arthur Gosling]
  13. Bloody Caesar [1969, Walter Chell]
  14. Canadarm [1975, Spar Aerospace/NRC]
  15. Standard time [1878, Sir Sandford Fleming]
  16. Electron Microscope [1939, James Hillier, Albert Prebus]
  17. Ski-Doo [1922, Armand Bombardier]
  18. BlackBerry [1999, Mike Lazaridis]
  19. Radio Voice Transmission [1900, Reginald Fessenden]
  20. Birchbark Canoe [First Peoples]
  21. Basketball [1892, James Naismith]
  22. Retractable Beer Carton Handle [1957, Steve Pasjack]
  23. UV Degradable Plastics [1971, James Guillet]
  24. Instant Replay [1955, CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada]
  25. Goalie Mask [1959, Jacques Plante]
  26. Marquis Wheat [1908, Sir Charles Saunders]
  27. Pablum [1930, Alan Brown, Theodore Drake, Frederick Tisdall]
  28. Lacrosse [First Peoples]
  29. Electric Oven [1892, Thomas Ahearn]
  30. Steam Fog Horn [1853, Robert Foulis]
  31. Walkie-Talkie [1942, Donald L. Hings]
  32. Alkaline Long-Lasting Battery [1959, Lewis Urry]
  33. Paint roller [1940, Norman Breakey]
  34. Electronic Music Synthesizer [1945, Hugh Le Caine]
  35. WeeVac 6 [1990, Wendy Murphy]
  36. Green Garbage Bag [1950, Harry Wasylyk, Larry Hansen, Frank Plomp]
  37. Snowblower [1925, Arthur Sicard]
  38. Self-propelled Combine Harvester [1937, Thomas Carroll]
  39. Instant Mashed Potatoes [1962, Edward Asselbergs]
  40. Explosives Vapour Detector [1985, Lorne Elias]
  41. Marine Screw Propeller [1833, John Patch]
  42. Plexiglas [1931, William Chalmers]
  43. Key Frame Animation [1969, Nestor Burtnyk, Marcelli Wein]
  44. CPR Mannequin: “ACTAR 911” [1989, Dianne Croteau, Richard Brault]
  45. G-Suit [1941, Wilbur Rounding Franks]
  46. Ardox Spiral Nail [1954, Allan Dove]
  47. Automatic Lubricating Cup [1872, Elijah McCoy]
  48. Crash-Position Indicator-CPI [1957, Harry Stevinson]
  49. Caulking Gun [1894, Theodore Witte]
  50. Separable Baggage Check [1882, John Mitchell Lyons]
 
hermanntrude
#2
insulin would definately be my number 1 too. although maybe not an invention as such
 
karrie
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by hermanntrudeView Post

insulin would definately be my number 1 too. although maybe not an invention as such

Well, they held a patent for it, so it obviously qualifies by some definition. They sold their patent for $1 so that no one could ever 'own' insulin again. The world doesn't get much more human than that.
 
hermanntrude
#4
I have some in my pocket. it's useful stuff i can tell u
 
TenPenny
#5
My favorite is the Robertson screw, but the variable pitch propeller invented by Turnbull is right up there. And, of course, Candu technology, which is way under used.
 
L Gilbert
#6
Yeah, i couldn't really choose one single invention. Insulin was out, though, as it's a discovery.
 
hermanntrude
#7
The process of extracting it though? or the process of making the human stuff without cutting humans open. clever stuff. they've only just started selling human insulin which is made from scratch. When i first started i used pig insulin. then i went on to human stuff made by genetically modified bacteria, now i'm on synthetic
 
karrie
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

My favorite is the Robertson screw, but the variable pitch propeller invented by Turnbull is right up there. And, of course, Candu technology, which is way under used.

I'd have voted the bloody ceasar right up there, and was happy to see the Robertson, since I use it almost exclusively.
 
Ariadne
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

I'd have voted the bloody ceasar right up there, and was happy to see the Robertson, since I use it almost exclusively.

Why isn't the AVRO on that list? Did I miss it or is it almost so buried in ancient history that even Canadians have forgotten about this great achievement in aviation ... and let's not mention Diefenbaker right now.
 
karrie
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by AriadneView Post

Why isn't the AVRO on that list? Did I miss it or is it almost so buried in ancient history that even Canadians have forgotten about this great achievement in aviation ... and let's not mention Diefenbaker right now.

Perhaps it has to do with the fact that it didn't impact the day to day lives of most canadians, and was shut down. I wouldn't have voted for it.
 
Ariadne
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Perhaps it has to do with the fact that it didn't impact the day to day lives of most canadians, and was shut down. I wouldn't have voted for it.

I think that if the project and technical drawings weren't destroyed, the invention would have impacted lives all over the world and it would have been a good thing. As it is, I suppose I'll vote for Gosling because I studied with his brother ... he's an innovator as well. JAVA rules!
 
TenPenny
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by AriadneView Post

Why isn't the AVRO on that list? Did I miss it or is it almost so buried in ancient history that even Canadians have forgotten about this great achievement in aviation ... and let's not mention Diefenbaker right now.

The Avro Arrow, you mean...(just to be ****)...it's not so much an invention, it was more of a product. Still and all, NASA would have had one heck of a time with the Appollo moon missions if it wasn't for all the Canadians who went there after the program was cancelled.

Dief the chief; great in oppositon; a disaster as PM.
 
Ariadne
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPennyView Post

The Avro Arrow, you mean...(just to be ****)...it's not so much an invention, it was more of a product. Still and all, NASA would have had one heck of a time with the Appollo moon missions if it wasn't for all the Canadians who went there after the program was cancelled.

Dief the chief; great in oppositon; a disaster as PM.

Thank you for clarifying and you're right. However, it's as much of an invention as the candu reactor or the telephone. Diefenbaker cancelled all grants and incentives for Canadian invention and product design ... oops ... and no one has picked up the ball since then. I think he was still focused on the war machine and didn't want to pull an einstein ... or whoever it was that finally figured out the nuke.
 
AndyF
#14
karrie:

#17 Ski-Doo was an american invention according to the US Encyclopedia. I did a research a few years back to see just how honest our friends are. I knew it was a Canadian invention, so checked their encyclopedia and there it was, someone in Minnesota or Illinois can't remember invented it. Didn't help my respect for them since.

AndyF
 
Toro
#15
Watch Blackleaf come in and claim all of these were invented by the English.
 
karrie
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by AndyFView Post

karrie:

#17 Ski-Doo was an american invention according to the US Encyclopedia. I did a research a few years back to see just how honest our friends are. I knew it was a Canadian invention, so checked their encyclopedia and there it was, someone in Minnesota or Illinois can't remember invented it. Didn't help my respect for them since.

AndyF


Well, that's a matter for debate. There were flawed designs being patented before Bombadier finally perfected the snowmobile after the death of his son. The first was in Wisconsin according to one website I found.
 
Kreskin
#17
I think we invented red tape if I'm not mistaken.
 
Toro
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

I think we invented red tape if I'm not mistaken.

and endless constitutional negotiations...
 
I think not
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by AndyFView Post

karrie:

#17 Ski-Doo was an american invention according to the US Encyclopedia. I did a research a few years back to see just how honest our friends are. I knew it was a Canadian invention, so checked their encyclopedia and there it was, someone in Minnesota or Illinois can't remember invented it. Didn't help my respect for them since.

AndyF

Why, because you were wrong?
 
Kreskin
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by ToroView Post

and endless constitutional negotiations...

That's right, the perpetually incomplete constitution.
 
I think not
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Telephone [1876, Alexander Graham Bell]

Canadians have offered their fare share of innovations to the world, but I will never be able to wrap this one around my head. I never understood where these claims lay.
 
AndyF
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Well, that's a matter for debate. There were flawed designs being patented before Bombadier finally perfected the snowmobile after the death of his son. The first was in Wisconsin according to one website I found.

What makes theUS patent office the Authority when something was invented.? Witnesses who can attest to the facts are just as credible.

AndyF
 
karrie
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by I think notView Post

Canadians have offered their fare share of innovations to the world, but I will never be able to wrap this one around my head. I never understood where these claims lay.

Even the show addressed this issue.... Bell, having lived in Canada both before and after his invention, is claimed by us but it is also claimed an american invention. a vast majority of his research prior to the actual patent was performed in Canada. if you'll note, Bell wasn't American either.
 
karrie
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by AndyFView Post

What makes theUS patent office the Authority when something was invented.? Witnesses who can attest to the facts are just as credible.

AndyF

No, but, we're talking a difference of decades between the original US patent (1927), and Bombardier's design in 1958. I can see where the americans would claim they invented it first
 
I think not
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Even the show addressed this issue.... Bell, having lived in Canada both before and after his invention, is claimed by us but it is also claimed an american invention. a vast majority of his research prior to the actual patent was performed in Canada. if you'll note, Bell wasn't American either.

Yes he was. He obtained his US citizenship (can't remember the year) at some point. His gravestone in Nova Scotia is also engraved with "Citizen of the United States".
 
Toro
#26
Doesn't look like Bell spent much time in Canada before he left for the States.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Graham_Bell (external - login to view)
 
L Gilbert
#27
I get lots of stuff before Bombardier came up with his version of the sled:
Quote:

Believe it or not, man invented the airplane before he invented a vehicle to travel across snow. The Wright brothers flew in 1903, while the first vehicle that was built to travel over snow was not invented until 1908!

1909

O.C. Johnson built a machine to travel over snow. It was about ten feet long and didn't steer very well. It would sometimes even sink through the snow. Its main use was to move logs around on snow-covered ground.

1924

Earl Eliason built one of the most amazing snowmobiles built in the United States in 1924, in Sayner, Wisconsin. This wooden toboggan was fitted with two skis in front, which were steered with ropes. Mr. Eliason called his invention the “motor toboggan.” This vehicle was powered by a 2-1/2 horsepower Johnson motor. Mr. Eliason manufactured his machine until 1939, when he sold it to F.W.D. Corporation in Canada.

1954

David Johnson made his design of a snowmobile during a weekend adventure with Alan and Edgar Hetteer, the owners of Polaris Industries. When the Hetteer brothers and Mr. Johnson returned from their weekend adventure, the Hetteer brothers weren't really pleased with Mr. Johnson's design. David Johnson got rid of the design just like Alan and Edgar has asked him to. But instead of throwing it away, Mr. Johnson sold it, though there were many problems with the first model. One day Mr. Johnson convinced the brothers to build a second machine so they could travel across snow much more easily than having to walk on snowshoes all day. Polaris Industries built a few machines each year from 1955 through 1957.

- library.thinkquest.org/04oct/...nowmobiles.htm (external - login to view)

www.winnipesaukee.com/forums/...ead.php?t=1507 (external - login to view)

www.eliason-snowmobile.com/ (external - login to view)
Last edited by L Gilbert; Jan 13th, 2007 at 01:50 AM..
 
Dalreg
#28
#7 Robertson Screw is funny. Over here in Australia you can't even find them. When you send them over they discard them and use something else.

The #18 Balckbery is over rated. What is it really, a fancy cell phone. Not one of Canada's finest inventions.
 
TenPenny
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by DalregView Post

#7 Robertson Screw is funny. Over here in Australia you can't even find them. When you send them over they discard them and use something else.

Yes, a lot of people don't understand them, but there is a huge amd growing loyal crowd in the US who have discovered how good they are: you can stick the screw on the end of the screwdriver, and it will stay there, allowing you to used one hand instead of two. Also, the heads don't strip very often. Phillips screws were actually desinged to be self limiting for torque, which is why the screwdriver often pops out when you are trying to tighten or remove them - they're designed to do that.
 
Ariadne
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by AndyFView Post

karrie:

#17 Ski-Doo was an american invention according to the US Encyclopedia. I did a research a few years back to see just how honest our friends are. I knew it was a Canadian invention, so checked their encyclopedia and there it was, someone in Minnesota or Illinois can't remember invented it. Didn't help my respect for them since.

AndyF

I thought Bombarier invented the snowmobile:
" It took him about 10 years and twelve prototypes before he came up
with something he was satisfied with. “The difference with this one was
he understood he had to put the weight on the back so on the traction
would be better. At this time he invented the sprocket wheel system
which is his most famous invention. He got a patent for it in 1937,”
states Julie. “ This vehicle marked a change and he named the garage
Moto Neige Bombardier. From this point on he was not just a mechanic,
but doing manufacturing. He sold about 9 of these units and made
changes every year.”
In 1936 Bombardier came up with the B7 model and from 1938 to 1948 ..."
www.slednews.com/cip/index.cf...n,1026,0,0,0,1 (external - login to view)

"The first United States patent for a snow-vehicle using the now recognized format of rear track(s) and front sleds was issued to a R.H.Muscott of Waters, Michigan on June 27, 1916 with U.S. Patent # 1,188,981 "
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowmobile (external - login to view)

I guess it was a US invention.
 

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