Road kill off menu this Christmas


sanctus
#1
Road kill fan Arthur Boyt will be foregoing his usual Christmas treat of badger, weasel or fox this year. Instead he will be tucking into roast turkey and all the usual trimmings at his in-laws' home.
Mr Boyt, 66, from Davidstow in Cornwall, has a freezer full of road kill which he eats regularly.
Although he has been an enthusiast for creatures killed on the road for 30 years, he said he would never foist his taste on his relatives.
"I'm a bit disappointed, but one has to go along with other people's prejudices," he told BBC News.



Some of the family would be pleased to have a bit of badger or rabbit, but you have to go along with the majority
Arthur Boyt
"Some of the family would be pleased to have a bit of badger or rabbit, but you have to go along with the majority.
"If I was providing the meat for myself it would be off the road."
Mr Boyt, who has a degree in biology, regularly eats badger, rabbit, deer, weasel, hedgehog, squirrel and fox.
Some of his more unusual meals have included a greater horseshoe bat and otter.
He says it is safe as long as it is cooked properly.
"Most meat is hung before it is eaten, but people think that because it has been killed on the road there must be something wrong with it.
"They do not realise that having been through the hands of the farming industry that it could have been treated with all kinds of things that are going to be far more unwholesome than wild animal."






Story from BBC NEWS:
 
CDNBear
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by sanctusView Post

Road kill fan Arthur Boyt will be foregoing his usual Christmas treat of badger, weasel or fox this year. Instead he will be tucking into roast turkey and all the usual trimmings at his in-laws' home.
Mr Boyt, 66, from Davidstow in Cornwall, has a freezer full of road kill which he eats regularly.
Although he has been an enthusiast for creatures killed on the road for 30 years, he said he would never foist his taste on his relatives.
"I'm a bit disappointed, but one has to go along with other people's prejudices," he told BBC News.



Some of the family would be pleased to have a bit of badger or rabbit, but you have to go along with the majority
Arthur Boyt
"Some of the family would be pleased to have a bit of badger or rabbit, but you have to go along with the majority.
"If I was providing the meat for myself it would be off the road."
Mr Boyt, who has a degree in biology, regularly eats badger, rabbit, deer, weasel, hedgehog, squirrel and fox.
Some of his more unusual meals have included a greater horseshoe bat and otter.
He says it is safe as long as it is cooked properly.
"Most meat is hung before it is eaten, but people think that because it has been killed on the road there must be something wrong with it.
"They do not realise that having been through the hands of the farming industry that it could have been treated with all kinds of things that are going to be far more unwholesome than wild animal."






Story from BBC NEWS:

OK, I'm not much for road kill, but if I or any of my friends happen to bag or bumper, rather, a Deer. We are more then willing to clean it and carve it. Besides that, wild game is void of all those hormones and steriods of processed or industrialized stock. So I can somewhat agree with Mr. Boyt. The taste is ten fold better then anything purchased. Not to mention, once the road rash is removed, better for you.
 
sanctus
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

OK, I'm not much for road kill, but if I or any of my friends happen to bag or bumper, rather, a Deer. We are more then willing to clean it and carve it. Besides that, wild game is void of all those hormones and steriods of processed or industrialized stock. So I can somewhat agree with Mr. Boyt. The taste is ten fold better then anything purchased. Not to mention, once the road rash is removed, better for you.

Gagging as I write.. I am far too much a city boy to handle this concept. I want my meat nicely processed and bagged up, thank you very much. My brother-in-law goes hunting once a year and I have tasted deer and vension and I find it gamey and repulsive. He just laughs at me and tells me I need to get away from the concrete
 
CDNBear
#4
I whole heartedly agree with your brother in law. You should try it smoked and aged right. It is as good as it gets, have you ever tried Beaver Tail stew? OMG, on a cold cold winters day it is without a doubt, a heart warmer.
 
csanopal
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

I whole heartedly agree with your brother in law. You should try it smoked and aged right. It is as good as it gets, have you ever tried Beaver Tail stew? OMG, on a cold cold winters day it is without a doubt, a heart warmer.


I've had that-it's excellant!
 
Sassylassie
#6
Sanctus, good grief and I ate a sandwich before I read that article. I think I'm gonna vomit, talk about a Hill Billy mentality. Gagging again, yuckyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy.
 
m_levesque
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SassylassieView Post

Sanctus, good grief and I ate a sandwich before I read that article. I think I'm gonna vomit, talk about a Hill Billy mentality. Gagging again, yuckyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy.

I'm in total agreement with you Sassy...totally gross...
 
AmberEyes
#8
Hehe, I guess those of you who haven't grown up with the idea of wild meat wouldn't find it too appetizing. I, however, grew up in a poor family with a mother who just happened to be a taxedermist. Some of our food was indeed wild game, and a very high percentage of that was roadkill. As long as it's fresh and clean, chances are it's better for you than the supermarket brand.
 
#juan
#9
Skunk must be a real treat.......
 
Sassylassie
#10
This conversation keeps going around in my grey matter: Ma what's for supper don't know Pa lets open the potatoe sack and see what's I's scraped off the 101 highsways today Ma. When I lived in NFL the highway to St. Johns was called Moose Lane, numerous people would die every year hitting Moose and the question that was always asked was "What happened to da Moose". It's common for those who survive a run in with a Moose to take it and eat the meat. I wonder, is that how Meat Cove in Cape Bretain got it's name?
 
sanctus
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by AmberEyesView Post

Hehe, I guess those of you who haven't grown up with the idea of wild meat wouldn't find it too appetizing. I, however, grew up in a poor family with a mother who just happened to be a taxedermist. Some of our food was indeed wild game, and a very high percentage of that was roadkill. As long as it's fresh and clean, chances are it's better for you than the supermarket brand.


Never did like wild meat. My family is French-Canadian, and they all loved vension, but me.As I said, I am a concrete boy. I am suspicious of wild trees and unpaved roads
 
CDNBear
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Skunk must be a real treat.......

You're a poet and didn't know it #juan. Never tried, but I heard it smells up the house worse then cabbage, lmao.
Quote: Originally Posted by sanctusView Post

Never did like wild meat. My family is French-Canadian, and they all loved vension, but me.As I said, I am a concrete boy. I am suspicious of wild trees and unpaved roads

I need to take you on a journey sanctus. I need to introduce you to all Gods creations. It is amazing to hear the brooks and creeks talk and giggle, the trees telling stories. To see nature at its finest.

Eating wild meat is more then just better for you, it is a spiritual experience, if you hunt it down and respect it as the life giver it is.
 
RomSpaceKnight
#13
At least a good fish fry of some fresh caught pickerel or trout with fresh blueberries for shore lunch. Or C.C. and lake water for drinks sitting around fire after a day of fishing.
 

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