Execution of Fla. Inmate Takes 34 Min.


sanctus
#1
- By RON WORD, Associated Press Writer



(12-14) 01:23 PST Starke, Fla. (AP) --
Death penalty opponents criticized the execution of a convicted murderer who took more than half an hour to die and needed a rare second dose of lethal chemicals.

Angel Nieves Diaz, 55, convicted of murdering a Miami topless bar manager 27 years ago, appeared to grimace before dying 34 minutes after receiving a double lethal chemical dose Wednesday.

Department of Corrections spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger said she doesn't believe Diaz felt any pain. She said Diaz started snoring and became unconscious after the first three drugs were administered and never regained consciousness.

Plessinger said Diaz had liver disease, which required the second dose of lethal chemicals. But Diaz's cousin Maria Otero said the family had no knowledge that he suffered from liver disease and said the execution was political.

"Who came down to Earth and gave you the right to kill somebody?" Otero said, referring to Gov. Jeb Bush. "Why a stupid second dose?"

Bush said in a statement that the Department of Corrections followed all protocols: "A preexisting medical condition of the inmate was the reason tonight's procedure took longer than recent procedures carried out this year," the statement said.

Diaz was pronounced dead at 6:36 p.m., despite his protests of innocence and requests for clemency made by the governor of his native Puerto Rico.

A spokesman for Floridians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, called Diaz's death a botched execution.

"They had to execute him twice," Mark Elliot said. "If Floridians could witness the pain and the agony of the executed man's family, they would end the death penalty."

In most Florida executions, the prisoner loses consciousness almost immediately and stops moving within three-to-five minutes. Two doctors watching a heart monitor then wait for it to show a flat line. They then inspect the body and pronounce death. The whole process happens within 15 minutes.

Diaz's final appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court challenged the chemicals used in the state's procedure, saying it constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. His appeals were rejected about an hour before his execution began.

Attorneys for him and other condemned inmates have been unsuccessfully challenging Florida's three-chemical method, saying it results in extreme pain that an inmate cannot express because one of the drugs is a paralyzing agent.

Puerto Rican officials, including Gov. Acevedo Vila and Senate President Kenneth D. McClintock, wrote Bush asking him to stop Diaz's execution, but he declined. Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, abolished capital punishment in 1929.

Moments before his execution, Diaz again denied killing Joseph Nagy during a robbery at the Velvet Swing Lounge. There were no eyewitnesses to Nagy's Dec. 29, 1979, murder. Most of the club's employees and patrons were locked in a restroom, but Diaz's girlfriend later told police he was involved.
 
thomaska
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by sanctusView Post

- By RON WORD, Associated Press Writer



(12-14) 01:23 PST Starke, Fla. (AP) --
Death penalty opponents criticized the execution of a convicted murderer who took more than half an hour to die and needed a rare second dose of lethal chemicals.

Angel Nieves Diaz, 55, convicted of murdering a Miami topless bar manager 27 years ago, appeared to grimace before dying 34 minutes after receiving a double lethal chemical dose Wednesday.

Department of Corrections spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger said she doesn't believe Diaz felt any pain. She said Diaz started snoring and became unconscious after the first three drugs were administered and never regained consciousness.

Plessinger said Diaz had liver disease, which required the second dose of lethal chemicals. But Diaz's cousin Maria Otero said the family had no knowledge that he suffered from liver disease and said the execution was political.

"Who came down to Earth and gave you the right to kill somebody?" Otero said, referring to Gov. Jeb Bush. "Why a stupid second dose?"

Bush said in a statement that the Department of Corrections followed all protocols: "A preexisting medical condition of the inmate was the reason tonight's procedure took longer than recent procedures carried out this year," the statement said.

Diaz was pronounced dead at 6:36 p.m., despite his protests of innocence and requests for clemency made by the governor of his native Puerto Rico.

A spokesman for Floridians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, called Diaz's death a botched execution.

"They had to execute him twice," Mark Elliot said. "If Floridians could witness the pain and the agony of the executed man's family, they would end the death penalty."

In most Florida executions, the prisoner loses consciousness almost immediately and stops moving within three-to-five minutes. Two doctors watching a heart monitor then wait for it to show a flat line. They then inspect the body and pronounce death. The whole process happens within 15 minutes.

Diaz's final appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court challenged the chemicals used in the state's procedure, saying it constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. His appeals were rejected about an hour before his execution began.

Attorneys for him and other condemned inmates have been unsuccessfully challenging Florida's three-chemical method, saying it results in extreme pain that an inmate cannot express because one of the drugs is a paralyzing agent.

Puerto Rican officials, including Gov. Acevedo Vila and Senate President Kenneth D. McClintock, wrote Bush asking him to stop Diaz's execution, but he declined. Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, abolished capital punishment in 1929.

Moments before his execution, Diaz again denied killing Joseph Nagy during a robbery at the Velvet Swing Lounge. There were no eyewitnesses to Nagy's Dec. 29, 1979, murder. Most of the club's employees and patrons were locked in a restroom, but Diaz's girlfriend later told police he was involved.

"Who came down to Earth and gave you the right to kill somebody?" Otero said, referring to Gov. Jeb Bush. "Why a stupid second dose?"

Classic, just classic.

I wonder how long it took for the victim he murdered to die?
 
Gonzo
#3
In the Bible it says "thou shall not kill". Why is it that religious people are the biggest supporters of capital punishment? Would Jesus support executions? I donít think so.
Capital punishment doesnít deter crime. If someone is capable of murder then theyíre insane to begin with. The thought of going to the electric chair isnít going to stop them.
 
tamarin
#4
Here we go again. The great capital punishment debate. With advances in forensic science, the case for CP is even stronger. Any western society that promises to protect the rights of its citizens should amply consider what's exactly meant by that. If it's not willing to go to bat for those who are murdered, and in fact does deliberately the opposite - insisting on the right to life of those who take it - then we can expect further erosion in the respect the public has for our institutions and culture.
 
Kreskin
#5
If an executioner can't figure out how to kill someone immediately with a concoction of lethal drugs then he shouldn't be doing it. Christ, bring a vet in. They have no problem putting animals down in a humane manner. How can it be complicated? Quadruple the dose. Heck, give him 50 times more than needed if it assures it gets done right.
 
ottawabill
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by GonzoView Post

In the Bible it says "thou shall not kill". Why is it that religious people are the biggest supporters of capital punishment? Would Jesus support executions? I donít think so.
Capital punishment doesnít deter crime. If someone is capable of murder then theyíre insane to begin with. The thought of going to the electric chair isnít going to stop them.

well I would be one of those people to which you speak, however I don't believe in capital punishment of any form...Nor do I believe that someone should ever walk the streets agian if they have committed a truely first degree murder..well planned and executed...

This sence of allowing Clifford Olson to go up for parolle every few years is crap.... If you kill one person you should go to jail for 20-25..if you kill 4 it should be 100!!!!
Canada has a system where after you've crossed the line and killed once you might as well continue...there will be no further penalty....The U.S. will kill you especially if your poor or a minority....somewhere in the middle of the 2 would be nice??
 
L Gilbert
#7
Generally I'm against killing, but in Olson's case (or Pickton's or whomever else) I'd make an exception. I think they should be killed and killed very slowly and painfully, kinda like what their victim's probably felt.
 
ottawabill
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Generally I'm against killing, but in Olson's case (or Pickton's or whomever else) I'd make an exception. I think they should be killed and killed very slowly and painfully, kinda like what their victim's probably felt.

I agree on a personal level but state sponsered revenge doesn't sit well with me...feels somewhat like Saudi Arabia..... I am fine with rotting in jail...no university courses....not internet...one light bulb..3 meals...the kinda meals you get in the hospital
 
sanctus
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by GonzoView Post

In the Bible it says "thou shall not kill". Why is it that religious people are the biggest supporters of capital punishment? Would Jesus support executions? I don’t think so.
Capital punishment doesn’t deter crime. If someone is capable of murder then they’re insane to begin with. The thought of going to the electric chair isn’t going to stop them.


Whatever gave you the idea the Church supported capitol punishment? It does not, under any circumstances. Haven't you ever noticed any of our dear nuns in the picket lines outside prisons?
 
sanctus
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by ottawabillView Post

I agree on a personal level but state sponsered revenge doesn't sit well with me...feels somewhat like Saudi Arabia..... I am fine with rotting in jail...no university courses....not internet...one light bulb..3 meals...the kinda meals you get in the hospital


I fully agree. The idea that we as a society is performing justice in such cases is contrary to the very idea of justice.

I also agree that our current prison system is somewhat more comfortable for its "clients" than I think is fair.
 
Sassylassie
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by sanctusView Post

I fully agree. The idea that we as a society is performing justice in such cases is contrary to the very idea of justice.

I also agree that our current prison system is somewhat more comfortable for its "clients" than I think is fair.


Amen men to that Sanctus, the PC/socialist crowd are more concerned with the rights of the Criminal and I've yet to see them show a modicum of empathy towards the victims.
 
Colpy
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by GonzoView Post

In the Bible it says "thou shall not kill". Why is it that religious people are the biggest supporters of capital punishment? Would Jesus support executions? I donít think so.
Capital punishment doesnít deter crime. If someone is capable of murder then theyíre insane to begin with. The thought of going to the electric chair isnít going to stop them.

Actually, the quote, when properly translated from the original is "Thou shalt not MURDER", murder being the unjustified taking of human life.

And we are ALL capable of murder.
 
Colpy
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Generally I'm against killing, but in Olson's case (or Pickton's or whomever else) I'd make an exception. I think they should be killed and killed very slowly and painfully, kinda like what their victim's probably felt.

I'm with you.

I don't like the idea of capital punishment, but for mass killers......bye bye. Quickly though, like putting down a mad dog.
 
tamarin
#14
I've always been for expansion of CP. The bulk of crime is committed by career criminals. Individuals who are incapable of rehabilitation. Canada, in return for my loyalty and tax dollars and community support, owes me. It's really big on promises and equally short on delivery. Execute humanely and quickly those who are natural born predators. They come in all guises.
 
Gonzo
#15
Sanctus said "Whatever gave you the idea the Church supported capitol punishment? It does not, under any circumstances. Haven't you ever noticed any of our dear nuns in the picket lines outside prisons?"

I meant religious people in the Bible belt of America.
I do believe that if you commit a murder you should be put away for life. Thatís LIFE. Not life plus chance of parole in 5 years. And not life in jail with the option of finishing university, watching digital cable TV, internet access, and all that. Life in a dingy jail.
Capital punishment has not stopped crime. Look at states like Texas and California. They have a high crime rate. Obviously the threat of execution has not stopped murders and rapist from committing crimes.
 
tracy
#16
I don't understand why being against capital punishment makes people think you have no empathy for victims of crime or their families. I just don't think that killing a person is something the state has the right to do when it has another way to keep society safe and punish offenders (actual life sentences in prison). It's a completely separate issue. And not all victims family members want executions either. I don't think it's fair to judge them based on that.
 
Gonzo
#17
Sometimes victimís families want revenge and confuse it for wanting a "sense of closure". But afterwards, they still donít feel any closure, and they're still mad. They have to heal themselves, but killing someone else doesn't do that.
The problem with what Canada has for a justice system is that for some reason we believe in rehabilitation. The system has never rehabilitated anyone. Rapist will always want to rape; murderers will always have that capacity to kill. Life in prison should be that, LIFE in prison.
 
Hotshot
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by GonzoView Post

In the Bible it says "thou shall not kill". Why is it that religious people are the biggest supporters of capital punishment? Would Jesus support executions? I donít think so.
Capital punishment doesnít deter crime. If someone is capable of murder then theyíre insane to begin with. The thought of going to the electric chair isnít going to stop them.

The Bible also says an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, etc.....
 
Hotshot
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

If an executioner can't figure out how to kill someone immediately with a concoction of lethal drugs then he shouldn't be doing it. Christ, bring a vet in. They have no problem putting animals down in a humane manner. How can it be complicated? Quadruple the dose. Heck, give him 50 times more than needed if it assures it gets done right.

A bullet in the head would be quickest.....
 

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