Ok. Advice wanted. NOW.


Said1
#1
I have a job interview tomorrow. I really want this job as it's in the "international affairs" area.....sort of. Anyway, any adivce? Anyone work for an embassy or diplomatic mission before?

I haven't been to a job interview in a LONG time. So bear with me here.
 
Kreskin
#2
This might sound silly but it is often overlooked and very underestimated. At the end of the interview, when they say "is there anything else you want to say or ask", say to them "yes, I am asking you for this job". It sounds rediculously simple but asking for something is often more effective.

Be prepared for behavioral interviewing. Instead of being asked "what would you ..." they'll likely ask "what DID you do.." etc. Have examples of teamwork, motivation, acheivement, results, effort etc ready to go in your mind.
 
Curiosity
#3
Said1

Just wanted to wish you the best of interviews.

Abassadorial or diplomatic oriented positions rely heavily on appropriate responses with a pause before they are made - as if you are thinking the most effective response.

Nervous reaction may make you want to answer quickly....try to down-tempo your normal speed and think reflectively while still making eye contact.

Employees are often expected to be reticent with information except through the proper channels.... and effectively sincere when they are giving out information (thus the eye contact).

Good luck!

Edit: And ditto on the advice Kreskin gave you (just saw it).
 
Said1
#4
Thanks for the advice and well wishes.

I'm a little out of my comfort zone with this one because Based on past experience I won't be getting the standad "list your stregths, weakness, what motivates you?" type questions. I'm not even sure what exactly the job entails. The guy didn't even really want to talk to me on the phone.
 
Kreskin
#5
Good luck Said.
 
zoofer
#6
Tell 'em you are a Bu****e, Gitmo rocks, you are for the death penalty for marijuana use, you can handle your booze, the UN stinks as does Kyoto.
Your fav website is here (external - login to view)
Do not mention me in any context as when you get the job some people will say it was due to my influence and advice! :P
 
Sassylassie
#7
Make eye contact, pause before answering any questions, and smile. Always agree with what ever the Interviewer says, it always works for me.
 
iamcanadian
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Said1

I have a job interview tomorrow. I really want this job as it's in the "international affairs" area.....sort of. Anyway, any adivce? Anyone work for an embassy or diplomatic mission before?

I haven't been to a job interview in a LONG time. So bear with me here.

Sounds like a government job. Bring a brown envelope stuffed with cash just in case.
 
Said1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by iamcanadian

Quote: Originally Posted by Said1

I have a job interview tomorrow. I really want this job as it's in the "international affairs" area.....sort of. Anyway, any adivce? Anyone work for an embassy or diplomatic mission before?

I haven't been to a job interview in a LONG time. So bear with me here.

Sounds like a government job. Bring a brown envelope stuffed with cash just in case.

Not our government, but cash just might work. Too bad I have none to spare. I wonder if they would take rolled pennies?
 
Said1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by zoofer

Tell 'em you are a Bu****e, Gitmo rocks, you are for the death penalty for marijuana use, you can handle your booze, the UN stinks as does Kyoto.
Your fav website is here (external - login to view)
Do not mention me in any context as when you get the job some people will say it was due to my influence and advice! :P

Thanks, but I think I'll stick with the pennies.
 
Kreskin
#11
Don't do what George Carlin suggested ... point to the picture of a woman on his desk and ask `who's the c___'? He claims it does wonders in an interview but I doubt it.
 
cortez
#12
Interviewers often ask what you can do for the company, so be sure to be ready to answer with specific qualities or abilities that you feel you can contribute.

Also, whatever the job is for, research about it before you go- find out things about their stats, lines of work, areas of research, etc. An interviewer wants to see that you have done your homework, and want THIS job, not just any job

One final tip, is that when an interviewer asks if you have any questions, make sure you do. Make sure you ask anything, be it about work relationships, ability to excel, and ask about work conditions. You should appear that YOU are interviewing the job as well- after all you arent desperate- they are going to have to entice you to take this job by showing you that it IS the best job around. Interviewers like to see confidence in the prospective employee (but not cockiness).

GOOD LUCK- sounds like an interesting field
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#13
Hey, the best of luck to you, Said! Everybody has given such great advice that I can't think of a single thing to add.
 
darkbeaver
#14
Smile and act interested. good luck
 
Toro
#15
Said1

I've hired many people over the years. Here are a few things I looked for.

- A genuine interest in the profession. And I mean genuine. There are many people who say they want to work in my profession. However, I always tried to separate those who had a genuine interest and those who thought it sounded sexy. Emphasize anything you may have done within that profession. On top of that, try to convey that this is what you really want to do as your career - which is, of course, this type of job - while being sincere. The worst thing I always heard was "I'm not sure what I want to do in my career" or "I'm checking this out" etc. Now I understand that not everyone will actually want to do this in the end, but its better to tell a white lie and convince me that this is it rather than leave me hanging about what it is you want to do. An interested, motivated employee is far easier to have than one who is not. The one piece of advice I'd give the students who are reading this is to find out what it is you want to do in life. Not only will you be happier, that's half the battle to getting a job in your field.

- Someone who was inquisitive. Ask questions at the end of your interview. If someone didn't ask questions, I took it that they really weren't that interested. Try and get your interviewer to talk as much as possible. The more he/she talks, the better.

- Someone with initiative. Emphasize things you done on your own.
 
ashley_rb
#16
This will help you:

Remember why you're there; to show them, which you will do, that you communicate clearly, to the point, that creates a highly defined picture. Your A personality type with strong and bold convictions which you keep a secret, you're judgements are fair and clear, and you expect as much from others as you project, not as you expect.

For a fact, this is exactly who they are looking to hire.

You may be video taped. They won't tell you. Depending on the department (or company) they will have a human behavourlist there watching you, taking notes, looking at your eye movements and breathing. Sit naturally in the seat, don't put on a show by "sitting up straight, being bright and alert, looking interested" and whatever you do DON"T act.

Bull s**t like that is exactly that. They will know you're putting on a show. Be natural, sit as you normally sit doing your work, in a meeting or communicating with others.

Don't expect them to ask you questions in only a single from. They will ask you several questions which are the same, asked differently each time. Its called Paralleling. Its a Neuro Lingistic Programming strategy used to see if you are lying and whether you are visual, hearing or feeling orientated and other things.

In some interviews, the interviewers will have a ear piece and the behavouralist will tell them what to ask.

How do you handle it? Try to answer every question looking to the left in the middle, never look up or down before answering a question or making a statement, a comment or opinion.

NLP training and certification is highly sought after by organizations.

If you know about NLP, don't put that on your resume or tell them. Keep it a secret. We know who has it and who doesn't.

If NLP is new for you, no probs. Start tomorrow to get a few books on it, if you want.

Luck has nothing to do with great interviews. Its about employing an exact strategy where you win all the time. I highly recommend you look into NLP, its the best resource for handling interviews. Stay away from the Tony Robbin types and big circuit speakers. They are there to use NLP to make money for themselves, not there for your success.

DON"T be so hung up on getting this one job. Relax, enjoy their company and come into the interview feeling confident, strong and relaxed. You know what to expect. Something you don't hear before going to an interview is this: Enjoy the process! Seriously. It will go great, you will do outstanding.

Tell us about it, if you want! Would love to read how you saw it, what you heard and how it made you feel.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#17
Absolutely brilliant advice, Ashley. I agree with it all, and especially the last, 'don't be so hung up on getting this one job'. I swear, that alone can relax a person just enough to increase the chances that they'll get the job.
 
Zan
#18
hello,

I've not been here long, but I just wanted to say that I've seen some excellent advice provided already...

I'd like to share that I just got hired and have gone through many interviews in the last few months in my quest to find the job that fits me perfectly... a couple of things that are still fresh in my memory:

I was asked by a few prospective employers questions that drew out what sort of employee/employer relationship I am accustomed to...
I explained that the most effective style of management I'd ever worked with was that of a "collapsible hierarchy" - several interviewers have really liked this phrase - (some didn't - which was a red flag for me, in knowing what works best for me) - it denotes a framework in which the hierarchy exists only as a chain of command when management decisions, signatures and approvals are required - in all other functions, the management 'collapses' into a level playing field... all members of the staff team are given equal opportunity and equal weight to provide input, feedback, and participate in the overall decisions in running the show...

When given the opportunity to ask questions, if they haven't addressed management style, it might be a good idea for you to inquire about that - if you work better under a specific model of management, you could end up either very happy, or very UNhappy with the managment style you're expected to work under/with.

In my last interview, I was asked what I would look for in a candidate if I were hiring for that position... I went with my gut and said that I'd look for someone who has the basic 'hard skills' the position requires, but I would focus more on someone who has an open attitude, a willingness to learn, and who would contribute in a positive way to the overall moral and disposition of the rest of the team, plus a genuine interest in the overall goals and objectives of the company.... that specific skills can be acquired by almost anyone, but a poor attitude is much more difficult to readjust to be in keeping with the dynamic of a successful company.

Thirdly, I was in a nice place mentally for the last interview as I was already employed in another position - I didn't NEED the new job, but I did WANT it... this gave me a sense of freedom to really relax and be myself - and to remember that I'm waiting for the RIGHT job that fits me perfectly - so I guess I viewed this is as much more of a 2-way street - us interviewing each other rather than me being the only one on the hot seat...

Try remember and recognize the value you will bring to any job you do - and that what makes you desire to succeed the most is likely a genuine enjoyment of the job and the people you'll be working with... it's very important that you like them and feel respected by them as much as it is for them to like you!

Best of luck! I'll look forward to reading how you fared...

uhhhh - one more thing - may seem kind of obvious, but I haven't seen it mentioned - do make sure sure you go in prepared with several copies of your resume in case there's a panel of interviewers with no copy of your resume to refer to - also a copy for yourself to avoid embarrassing blunders on such things as what dates you worked for whom (like I did in one interview lolll) and a list of references to hand over if they request them - which they likely will - especially if they intend to short list you or offer you the position....
anyway, good luck again!

Zan
 
Curiosity
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by ashley_rb

This will help you:

Remember why you're there; to show them, which you will do, that you communicate clearly, to the point, that creates a highly defined picture. Your A personality type with strong and bold convictions which you keep a secret, you're judgements are fair and clear, and you expect as much from others as you project, not as you expect.

For a fact, this is exactly who they are looking to hire.

You may be video taped. They won't tell you. Depending on the department (or company) they will have a human behavourlist there watching you, taking notes, looking at your eye movements and breathing. Sit naturally in the seat, don't put on a show by "sitting up straight, being bright and alert, looking interested" and whatever you do DON"T act.

Bull s**t like that is exactly that. They will know you're putting on a show. Be natural, sit as you normally sit doing your work, in a meeting or communicating with others.

Don't expect them to ask you questions in only a single from. They will ask you several questions which are the same, asked differently each time. Its called Paralleling. Its a Neuro Lingistic Programming strategy used to see if you are lying and whether you are visual, hearing or feeling orientated and other things.

In some interviews, the interviewers will have a ear piece and the behavouralist will tell them what to ask.

How do you handle it? Try to answer every question looking to the left in the middle, never look up or down before answering a question or making a statement, a comment or opinion.

NLP training and certification is highly sought after by organizations.

If you know about NLP, don't put that on your resume or tell them. Keep it a secret. We know who has it and who doesn't.

If NLP is new for you, no probs. Start tomorrow to get a few books on it, if you want.

Luck has nothing to do with great interviews. Its about employing an exact strategy where you win all the time. I highly recommend you look into NLP, its the best resource for handling interviews. Stay away from the Tony Robbin types and big circuit speakers. They are there to use NLP to make money for themselves, not there for your success.

DON"T be so hung up on getting this one job. Relax, enjoy their company and come into the interview feeling confident, strong and relaxed. You know what to expect. Something you don't hear before going to an interview is this: Enjoy the process! Seriously. It will go great, you will do outstanding.

Tell us about it, if you want! Would love to read how you saw it, what you heard and how it made you feel.

Nice work Ashley

Trouble for Said1 is her interview is tomorrow - NLP isn't something you can cram. The rest of your advice is fine but on the first interview I doubt they are going to have the observers until they hone down the applicants - if there are more than two or three really good candidates.

The rest of your advice is great - except Said1 has probably fainted now. :P

Said1 be yourself, keep it honest and simple. They want the real you to be interviewed not something set up to please behavioralists or cameras. Smile - eye contact and curiosity or interest in the work expected. Presentation is important but it has to be the real you - because if you get the job - the real you will have to be doing it every day.... as you presented yourself.
 
Said1
#20
Thanks for all the great advice and well wishes.

My clothes are ironed and I'm armed with bus tickets.

Till tomorrow.
 
ashley_rb
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

...on the first interview I doubt they are going to have the observers until they hone down the applicants - if there are more than two or three really good candidates.

There will be observers, I absolutely guarantee it. And I can quarantee you some of the applicants themselves will be observers only pretending to be applicants. Behavourlists pretending to be applicants are called seedlings.

Seedlings are trained to start up friendly little chats and they will be wired for sound. They also pass themselves off as business people "just" waiting in the waiting room to be called if there are only 1 or 2 applicants.

We were asked about a job interview that's for "international affairs area....." and we were asked if "Anyone work for an embassy or diplomatic mission before?"

I'm assuming said1 isn't going to McDonalds to be a fry cook or Red Lobster to steam some crab. I doubt its not a restaurant or retail job where you can get by on high school diploma, good looks and a smile.

Video tape will be recording from the front door to the waiting rooms to the interview room. Depending upon the job, there could be as many as 2 behavourists for every 1 applicant.

Embassy and diplomatic job interviews are not the same as other job interviews. The interviewers and behavourlists all ready know about the applicant before each applicant enters the front door.
 
Curiosity
#22
Zan

You wrote:
Thirdly, I was in a nice place mentally for the last interview as I was already employed in another position - I didn't NEED the new job, but I did WANT it... this gave me a sense of freedom to really relax and be myself - and to remember that I'm waiting for the RIGHT job that fits me perfectly - so I guess I viewed this is as much more of a 2-way street - us interviewing each other rather than me being the only one on the hot seat...

In addition to a terrific sketch of worthy advice for any job applicant I beg people here to download your response for others to use in the future, and I was particularly taken with the quote
I put up from your essay.

The frame of mind for the interviewee is often a frail one - feelings of inadequacy or need keep jumping into the picture, when the applicant should be focused on the positives he/she brings to the prospective employer.

Interviewing for a job is equally important in that a person will spend countless hours, time and invest a great deal in learning a new company, its personalities, its standards, its method of operation and its future potential for security and growth within.

The interview is important for both parties - and the applicant should always consider his or her needs be met as well and hopefully arrive at a feeling of "I am going to expand my world with this job....it is right for me..."

Too many people think the job is what the employer wants. That is the wrong perspective and places the applicant in a submissive position. It is equally important the applicant understand personal skills and attributes are just as important (or imperative) to an employer - and if there is a match - exceptional things can happen.

Equally important - if there are any doubts as to a "match", these points in question should be discussed fully - even if the interview then leads to a non-hire - nobody wants to be in a job they hate or one in which they will not have the capacity to master.

I had to laugh at the reactions you got with your model of collapsible hierarchy. Some management (insecure) would no doubt hear that as "crumbling heirarchy" hahaha...

Good work - thanks for sharing your knowledge.
 
Curiosity
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by ashley_rb

Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child...on the first interview I doubt they are going to have the observers until they hone down the applicants - if there are more than two or three really good candidates.There will be observers, I absolutely guarantee it. And I can quarantee you some of the applicants themselves will be observers only pretending to be applicants. Behavourlists pretending to be applicants are called seedlings.
Seedlings are trained to start up friendly little chats and they will be wired for sound. They also pass themselves off as business people "just" waiting in the waiting room to be called if there are only 1 or 2 applicants.
We were asked about a job interview that's for "international affairs area....." and we were asked if "Anyone work for an embassy or diplomatic mission before?"
I'm assuming said1 isn't going to McDonalds to be a fry cook or Red Lobster to steam some crab. I doubt its not a restaurant or retail job where you can get by on high school diploma, good looks and a smile.
Video tape will be recording from the front door to the waiting rooms to the interview room. Depending upon the job, there could be as many as 2 behavourists for every 1 applicant.

Quote has been trimmed
Ashley - that's exceptional stuff you know

I forget we are discussing Canadian diplomatic procedure and perhaps they have more people to staff the initial interviews at the early stages as well. Seedlings (or snitches) sounds absolutely vile. If one has to be suspect from the first moment on, I would rather question the mindset of the hiring group. Paranoia Place!

Cameras recording body language and interview responses are standard procedure but at the intial interview when you have twenty or more applicants? Really?

Even if the position was in enforcement activity or investigation,
the initial stab would be a review of experience, skills, intelligence, ability to relocate, and the standard stuff of government work.

If Saidl is already familiar with this interview procedure, she has obviously worked in similar posts and would understand the drill,
but it seems she is coming from a first time position - not in work skills - but in milieu familiarity.

Most government positions have to be advertised as part of the hiring codes. ( I assume Canada adheres to this general bulletin kind of recruitment )... therefore I have to disagree with your
scenario of so many observers - that would come later when the candidates are few and hopefully Said1 will be one of them.

Thing is with general recruitment - they are not hiring internally - so I has to be a Level 1, skilled job with little security clearance other than the standard for government of Loyalty Oath.

Still you have some real inside information and insight into the hiring practices and have opened doors many people may not have been aware of.

Good stuff and absolutely riveting to read. I also liked your observation regarding the Burkha tape on another thread and the fact some of the cloaks could be disguise for males.... you have been well trained!
 
Jay
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Said1

Thanks for all the great advice and well wishes.

My clothes are ironed and I'm armed with bus tickets.

Till tomorrow.


Good luck, Said1!!
 
jeckgo
#25
just pray to HIM....

good luck
 
Said1
#26
Thanks again all, your comments are great.

Now, to the interview. As I suspected, there wasn't one. Just a group of 15 or so in a room waiting for over an hour to take a "test". I don't think everyone showed up either, not sure though.

During this hour, many people were rude to the receptionist, complaining and talking on cell phones. All the while people were coming in and out. Very heavy security, so I assume there were cameras everywhere and the receptionist could see everywhere with the monitors placed in her booth.

Having been in this type of situation once before, I just sat there and read old term papers I had in the bag I brought with me, because I thought I would more than likely have to wait.

Anyway, after about an hour and 15 min, the Deputy Commissioner finally emerged with 6 other men to distribute the test questions, clip board and pens. We had two small essays and a letter to write on the following topics: What do you like about Canada? Write a letter to the mayor complaining about the lack of snow removal in front of a city building downtown and What do you think the major challenges immigrants face after entering Canada? Any suggestions. Easy enough, despite my terrible penmanship and probable spelling errors. We had one hour and fourty minutes to do this with all the above mentioned present.

And that was that. I'll find out more later.

I was curious to see if anyone had interview with an embassy or commission because I knew the tactics Ashly mentioned were used, although to the extent of which I was unsure and wanted some pointers as to what to watch out for. I've been interviewed for embassy positions twice, one instance I turned the job down, the second position had language requirments I didn't have so I was turned down. Not sure why they wanted to meet with knowing this before hand, but it was a fun experience nonetheless.

Again, let me say thanks to everyone and taking the time to post in this thread, I really appreciate it!
 
Jay
#27
Oh and I forgot to mention....wear something skimpy and revealing.
 
MMMike
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Jay

Oh and I forgot to mention....wear something skimpy and revealing.

That's totally good advice, try flirting with the interviewer too. If you're nervous for the job interview, I always recommend bringing a flask and having a couple nips before going in. Or if it's more your thing, take a couple tokes a while before the interview... don't forget the visine. Make sure you don't come across as too eager or too uptight. Laugh a lot during the interview, and look at your watch often. If it is not going well, fake an illness and try to re-schedule.

I hope it goes well Said1! If you need anymore advice or tips, feel free to email me at unemployed_mmmike at hotmail dot com.

Cheers!
 
Curiosity
#29
Said1 How exciting to read of your adventure!!!

It was so neat of you to include the whole forum and the advice you received - especially from Ashley concerning all the monitoring - no doubt put you way ahead of the group.

Now the wait begins ick!!

I am surprised they allowed cell phones in the offices. U.S. government will not unless you pass through some kind of security clearances and then only in designated areas. But they are way more paranoid down here....

I hope you have a treat planned for yourself after going through that stress this morning..... whatever it is relax and enjoy and we will be waiting for the next chapter !!!

WC
 
Said1
#30
Woooot, round II tomorrow afternoon!
 

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