One Good Reason why you should quit smoking


Hard-Luck Henry
#1
This post was brought to you by the letter "Q", and the number 13.
 
Reverend Blair
#2
But if I quit smoking, then I'll cough, and coughing is the only exercise I get.
 
roseman
#3
quitting smoking is never easy, second quitting is depend on yourself, your the only one who can help yourself, this nosmoq is a one form of help which you can quit smoke for just a week..
 
Reverend Blair
#4
Getting rid of spammers is never easy either.
 
roseman
#5
it's not that spam..pls it's a word and not a say...
 
Reverend Blair
#6
You came here just to advertise your product. That's spam, crushed donkey all the way.
 
#juan
#7
roseman

I have no doubt the smoking is bad for your health but unless you've smoked so much that you have destroyed your lung function or damaged your heart, the effect on sexual function is going to be quite subtle. In other words, you are talking up your hat.
 
Twila
#8
6 months, no smoking for this chic-o-let! Yay me.
 
Reverend Blair
#9
About 6 second between drags for me. That's long enough.
 
GL Schmitt
#10
(Advertisement)

I quit a twenty-five year cigarette habit in three months using the nicotine patch.

I had been trying for years, but weak will-power and an office place filled with smoke kept me tied to my habit.

Ten years ago, when the office became an official (enforced) no smoking area, I gave it another try.

I checked with my doctor and he suggested that in my condition the nicotine patch would probably work best for me, and made certain I understood the instructions, and the risks of not following the instructions.

I nearly had to employ the most desperate use of the patch (over the mouth) but I did make it.

I have been smoke-free for 10 years.

Rev,

The coughing doesn't stop for six months. By that time, one feels great and smells sweet. One can start chasing women, again. (In your case, Mrs. Rev.)


(Advertisement)
 
Reverend Blair
#11
I chase Mrs. Rev now. I'm oddly healthy considering the condition I'm in.
 
#juan
#12
NIce going GL

Your story sounds like me except I had quit many times, only to fail when I could somehow convince myself that smoking was really good for me and that it was wrong to put so much pressure on myself to quit something I enjoyed. As quitting smoker I was a fickle, bull****ting, bastard who would have sold his grandmother for a cigarette. I did eventually quit almost twenty years ago and you know, when I see someone lighting up that first one with a cup of coffee I still feel a little pang of envy.
 
Twila
#13
Quote:

when I see someone lighting up that first one with a cup of coffee I still feel a little pang of envy.

I get this as well. But I hate that my addiction controled my actions and I remember the stink of smoke in my car and on my clothes. And the control it had over me. That's what keeps me from " just one drag".
 
Ocean Breeze
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila

6 months, no smoking for this chic-o-let! Yay me.

Good for you!!

ony THREE months of no smoking for YT. .....but doing very well ....( I think

Most impressive feeling is the FREEDOM from being so "attached" to "having a smoke". another realization is what a time waster it is. Have so much more time now. A lot more active now too.

So many changes with one change of habit. (or losing a "habit)

Went "cold turkey".........with several" gimmicks" in place to deal with the "cravings" and other habit strength behaviors that accompany the smoking habit . How about you??

Interested in What motivated people here to quit. ( main reason.......or reasons)

Mine: "Realized" one day when buying the things......that I was "BURNING" $10.00 (min.) per day. .... and had nothing to show for it. So it released all this MONEY to do something constructive with..........(like pay a credit card bill off sooner.

............and the STINK it creates in the home, on ones clothes and one's person.

(now I can "smell" a smoker from a far........

Quite curious that it had nothing to do with health.......even though my profession was in the health field.
 
GL Schmitt
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan

. . . Your story sounds like me except I had quit many times. . .

About twenty of those twenty-five years were spent trying to quit, and failing.

It was the combination of an enforced, smoke-free office environment and nicotine patches that I managed to quit, and then just barely.

I still know all the alibis and rationalizations off by heart.

As it was, I spent two years breaking myself of reaching into my cigarette pocket every time I was stressed, or bored.

One fine spring, afternoon six months after the last patch, while walking in the local park a fellow walked by exhaling a huge cloud of smoke, and I came within Amesí ace of mugging him for his cigarette.

Nicotine is a tenacious addiction.

Now as I am getting older than dirt, I only hope that sex proves to be equally difficult to quit.
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze


Quite curious that it had nothing to do with health.......even though my profession was in the health field.


It's always surprising how many health professionals smoke. I know a few who do - you'd think they'd know better (pressures of the job, I suppose). Having said that, everyone who smokes knows the risks, nowadays. They must consider the pros outweigh the cons.

Or maybe they're just violently addicted.
 
Ocean Breeze
#17
GL: What was your MOTIVATION (reason) to quit???

Interested in the reasons people want to quit or do quit.

BTW: Yes it is tenacious......and that is the control it has over a person. ..........IF one allows it.

When I get an "urge" or wee craving........I have to stop, take a deep breath and ask myself.........Who/what is in control here??? Me or the habit??? Do I want to be a slave to this???

Some inner dialogue really helps to get past those moments. Interesting that is one persists with this type of inner dialogue ......the cravings weaken noticeably. .......to the point they have NO power over one. (in this case YT)..
 
Reverend Blair
#18
Quote:

Nicotine is a tenacious addiction.

About 25 years after my grandfather quit, it still used to drive him up the wall if somebody lit a cigarette in the truck at harvest time. For some reason that just made him crave a cigarette.

The last time I was up to see him he wasn't sure who I was (he's got Alzheimers and is in a home now), but he suggested that we leave the old people inside and go out for a smoke because you can't smoke around old people.


Quote:

Or maybe they're just violently addicted.

That'd be my guess.
 
Ocean Breeze
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Hard-Luck Henry

Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze


Quite curious that it had nothing to do with health.......even though my profession was in the health field.


It's always surprising how many health professionals smoke. I know a few who do - you'd think they'd know better (pressures of the job, I suppose). Having said that, everyone who smokes knows the risks, nowadays. They must consider the pros outweigh the cons.

Or maybe they're just violently addicted.


Smoking is a substance addiction like any other "drug" that is addictive. It matters little what profession one is.....what color , what age , what gender. And when one quits.....it is important to realize that what one is going through is a DETOXIFICATION process..... just like any other addictive substance. The body has to detoxify from the substance .......and ergo the cravings and other symptoms. There are many valuable tools to use during this detox process. The KEY factor is MOTIVATION . A built in "reward " system is a good idea too.

LIke any addiction..........it is a psychological addiction ....in addition to a physical addiction.
 
#juan
#20
Hi Ocean Breeze

I am one of the youngest sibblings in a very large family. Smoking was a kind of "right of passage" when boys reached fifteen years old. My dad said, "If you are man enough to smoke, you are man enough to pay for your own". So I could smoke if I earned enough money to buy them. Finally, years later, I watched one of my older brothers cough to death with lung cancer. It was a long painful death. On that day I started to quit smoking.
 
Ocean Breeze
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan

Hi Ocean View

I am one of the youngest sibblings in a very large family. Smoking was a kind of "right of passage" when boys reached fifteen years old. My dad said, "If you are man enough to smoke, you are man enough to pay for your own". So I could smoke if I earned enough money to buy them. Finally, years later, I watched one of my older brothers cough to death with lung cancer. It was a long painful death. On that day I started to quit smoking.

So SORRY about your brother. That would sure be a "motivating" factor.......and a very sad one indeed.

(have seen people die of Lung problems caused in part at least by smoking........and it is not a pleasant departure from this life...)
 
#juan
#22
Sorry bout that, Ocean Breeze
 
unclepercy
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila

6 months, no smoking for this chic-o-let! Yay me.

Yay from me to you. I quit in 1979. Reason? I just got tired of messing with it.

I am interested in knowing if you gained any weight. Crap, I gained 30 lbs. I know that's why some people won't quit - they know they are going to pack it on.

Percy
 
Twila
#24
Thanks Percy! I quit because I disliked being addicted to something. I hated the idea that I was not in control.

I hoped to gain weight. So far I've gained 10lbs. But that's it. I've never weighed this much without some medical reason. Last time I was pregnant. Except I weighed 150lbs by the time my daughter was born. Now I'm at a some what normal 115lbs. I hope that maybe by the 1 yr mark I'll have gained another 10lbs.
 
GL Schmitt
#25
Motivations?

Well, since you asked, Ocean. . . .


Actually, my motivation to smoke is a better story than the one to quit.

A good buddy of mine was having difficulty in high school. He was supposed to write a report for class. He had already flunked once, so he brought his problem to me.

Out of all the choices of topics he had been given, he had signed up for researching and reporting on the ongoing attempt to decrease the danger of cancer from smoking cigarettes. (This was mid-sixties.) He chose that topic because (wait for it) his father smoked, and he thought he could just write down whatever his father said. (When he tried to have a conversation with his father about cigarette smoking and lung cancer, his father threw him out of the house, and so I inherited him.)

My portion of his report was collecting ten years of reports on tar and nicotine testing of different brands of cigarettes, and how various efforts like filters and high porosity paper had affected those brandsí output.

For example, I can still remember one cigarette Ė Winchester Ė that had double the tar AFTER they had added a filter. (I presume they used poorer quality tobacco to pay for the filter.)

My buddy, who was squeamish about any research which involved a library decided to try to gain empirical knowledge by swiping a few cigarettes from all his relatives who smoked different brands, then compare them himself.

When it came time, he graciously invited me to join him.

A first we just puffed smoke about the room, and tried to see if we could discern any difference. We quickly learned that the difference was more noticeable if we inhaled the smoke. Then we both got as dizzy as a goose, and had to quit.

I suppose I donít have to go any further. You can easily tell what happened, even if it was a complete surprise to us.

As it was my later teens, and there still was a misplaced cachet of glamour around smoking I continued to smoke until I went further out into the world.

At various times while trying to obtain an advanced education, and while surviving my first several jobs, the cost of my habit was born in on me. The occasional cinder burns in clothing was no cause for delight, either. The smell on my clothes (and presumably my breath) was disheartening.

It was when I first started working as a writer (third continuity writer in a 50,000 watt AM station) that I decided I should quit.

When you write, you smoke. Usually while I was typing like I had missed a deadline, a cigarette was slowly turning into a long ashen corpse in the ash tray. If I stopped to think, I instinctively reached for a cigarette, even if it was only to find, when I set it down in the ash tray, that a half-burned companion was already there, waiting.

For the first three years, I shared an office with another writer who was forever quitting. Monday morning he would announce that he had quit Sunday night, and it was now eighteen hours since he had smoked a cigarette. He would remind me at the nineteenth hour, the twentieth hour, and the twenty hour and thirty minute mark.

By noon he was bumming cigarettes from me.

Even if he did get passed the first day, he would crow so much about his accomplishment that I would begin to wish that he would start bumming again, and not give me such an earache.

It was at that time that I decided that when and if I ever quit smoking, I would never tell anybody about it, until I was certain that it had taken. So, even when I tried to quit, and had gone for a few days without, someone would join me, light up, and seeing I wasnít smoking, offer me one of theirs.

It was many years later, when I changed to a new job where I was unknown, and I learned that they enforced a smoke-free office policy that I decided to give it one last try.

I had a month before I joined them, so I contacted my doctor and asked about patches, or some other aid, since I had never managed to quit on my own hook. He recommended one of two varieties (three months, each monthís patch a step down from the monthís before, until I could stop cold turkey).

When I started my new job, I had been a non smoker for two weeks.

I donít know if anybody ever noticed that occasionally I would reach for my inside coat pocket, or my shirt pocket if I was in shirtsleeves. If they did, they never mentioned it to me.
 
Ocean Breeze
#26
GL...... LOVE your story. ! and you write so well. ( a treat to read) Giggling out loud ........at the follies/humor of human nature.
 

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