Question??

peapod
#1
If you are driving down the highway at light speed and turn on your headlights, what happens?
 
Reverend Blair
#2
The light will be compressed to the point where you cannot see it.

If you've ever watched racing something odd happens with the sound...it changes as the cars go past. That's because the sound waves are travelling at a different rate in relation to the car. The sound is compressed as the car approaches, but spreads back out as the car passes.

You can notice that on the highway as well, but not as easily because the speeds are lower and the bastards make us use mufflers.

Light works on the same basic principle.

I did a crappy job explaining that, but I hope you get the idea. If you ask a silly question, I'll answer it anyway.
 
Reverend Blair
#3
Oh, unintersting sidenote: When they first broke the speed of sound in aircraft, there were some who theorised that the sound waves (sonic boom) would rip the plane apart. It never happened.

When they first broke the speed of sound in a car, some theorised that the sonic boom would bounce back off of the ground and would rip the car apart, or at least cause it to lose control. That never happened either.
 
peapod
#4
I remember old lady Wilson. On rainy days she would come out into her yard in the rain wearing a sun bonnet and bathrobe. She'd turn on the lawn sprinklers and dance in the rain and sprinklers and puddles singing "Sunny Side of the Street." Then when people would walk by she would throw tomatoes at them and yell "the show must go on!"
We all thought she was crazy. Man, we had a lot to learn, huh?
catfish jones
 
missile
#5
Tossing tomatoes at passersby? Sounds like she was a tad eccentric,at least
 
Vanni Fucci
#6
I tossed a condom full of yoghurt out my schoolbus window at a passing car one time...man that was hillarious...
 
manda
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by missile

Tossing tomatoes at passersby? Sounds like she was a tad eccentric,at least

This is one of the main reasons I plan to act senile long before I actually start the downhill slide...so I can enjoy the looks of the passers by!
 
peapod
#8
For some unknown reason, we all suspected manda was the one who stole the Halloween pumpkin, but we couldn't prove it. If we could have just found one clue we would have confronted her about it. I'll never forget the sneaky look she had on her face as she left wearing that goofy big orange hat. Man, was that dumb looking. It looked like a pum...hey!
catfish jones
 
manda
#9
nyuck, nyuck, nyuck *hurls overripe kumkwat* as she scuttles down the street dressed in a pup-tent
 
Vanni Fucci
#10
...as to the speed of light question though...you may want to check with Dex...he'd probably know...

...I think that if the speed of light in a vacuum were to be accellerated beyond 186K mps, the Theory of General Relativity would be shot to ****, as C could no longer be considered to be a constant...

...and maybe that's why some quantum theories can never be proven...C is not a constant but a variable...hmmm
 
peapod
#11
You know, that last line was almost clever :P
 
no1important
#12
If you had your lights on and were travelling at speed of light you would be going at same speed, so light would not shine ahead of you on the road.
 
manda
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Vanni Fucci

...as to the speed of light question though...you may want to check with Dex...he'd probably know...

...I think that if the speed of light in a vacuum were to be accellerated beyond 186K mps, the Theory of General Relativity would be shot to ****, as C could no longer be considered to be a constant...

...and maybe that's why some quantum theories can never be proven...C is not a constant but a variable...hmmm

*Manda hurls condom full of yougurt at Vanni* hee hee! You're right! it is hilarious....Pass the screech there Vanni-boy!
 
mrmom2
#14
DEX where are you this thread needs you
 
GreenGreta
#15
If a grey dodge omni drove by you in Ontario and you were suddenly bombarded by pears, it was me. It was many years ago but still me. Sometimes the pears were hard, sometimes they were mush.

Good times.
 
Nascar_James
#16
Talking about all these speeds is actually very fascinating. Particularly for folks that are into racing.

The speed of sound is often called Mach 1. It's usually associated with jet planes. Jets that exceed the speed of sound are referred to as supersonic jets.

When talking about the speed of light, we assume that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.

The highest speed attainable is the speed of light in a vacuum. However, propagation of light can be slowed down considerably in materials due to interactions between light (photons) and particles of the material. It therefore becomes possible for a particle moving at relativistic speeds to actually exceed the speed of light in that medium. When that happens, the particle emits radiation in the form of a 'shock wave', widely known as Cerenkov radiation. It's obvious from this that Cerenkow radiation never occurs in vacuum.

If someone were ever to figure out a way to exceed the speed of light, we would have the basis of time travel. Time is defined as the fourth dimension within our universe. As we all know, no one has successfully demonstrated time travel, but no one has been able to rule it out either.
 
Reverend Blair
#17
The speed of sound changes depending on conditions. It is possible that the speed of light changes as well.

I thought they had demonstrated time travel a couple of years ago using sub-atomic particles or something. I know that they demonstrated teleportation and I think it was based on the same basic theories and experiments.
 
Nascar_James
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Reverend Blair

The speed of sound changes depending on conditions. It is possible that the speed of light changes as well.

I thought they had demonstrated time travel a couple of years ago using sub-atomic particles or something. I know that they demonstrated teleportation and I think it was based on the same basic theories and experiments.

All this talk regarding time/speed travel (being a race fan) really is fascinating!

Transporting humans through teleportation would be very very unlikey. Teleportation is a disembodied form of transport. It can not be instataneous, otherwise the theory of relativety goes out the window. A device required to measure our atoms for teleportation would require slicing us apart to do that. We require about 10 Gigabytes (that's about 10^11 = 100,000,000,000 bits) to give the full three dimensional details of a human down to one millimeter resolution in each direction. If we forget about recognizing atoms and measuring their velocities and just scale that to a resolution of one-atomic length in each direction that's about 10^32 bits (a one followed by thirty two zeros). This is so much information that even with the best optical fibers conceivable it would take over one hundred million centuries to transmit all that information! So it would no be feasible.

An area of interest that would provide insight into possible time travel would include rotating Kerr Black Holes, if they exist. Black Holes resemble an ice cream cone. In these types of black holes, it would theoretically be possible to enter, go through and exit a black hole (the exit would be a white hole with the reverse effect of a black hole). Dying stars would collapse into a rotating ring of neutrons that would produce sufficient centrifugal force to prevent being crushed by the infinite gravitational force at its center. This would obviously not be possible for non-rotating black holes.

The cosmic strings theory is another scenario. Thsi is based on string-like objects that some scientists believe were formed in the early universe. These strings may line the entire length of the universe and are under immense pressure -- millions upon millions of tons. These cosmic strings, which are thinner than an atom, would generate an enormous amount of gravitational pull on any objects that pass near them. Objects attached to a cosmic string could travel at incredible speeds, and because their gravitational force distorts spacetime, they could be used for time travel.

The best hope for ever succeeding in time travel would probalby lie with wormholes. If they do exist, not only would they allow us to travel through time, they could allow us to travel many light-years from earth in only a fraction of the amount of time that it would take us with conventional space travel methods. As the velocity of an object nears the speed of light, time slows down. Scientists have discovered that even at the speeds of the space shuttle, astronauts can travel a few nanoseconds into the future.

A wormhole is a tunnel-like image and is formed by two masses applying enough force on spacetime to create a tunnel connecting distant points in the universe.

As an example to how this wormhole might be formed, if we take a sheet and fold it over and leave a space between the top and bottom. If we then Place a baseball on the top side, it will cause a curvature to form. If an equal mass were placed on the bottom part of the sheet at a point that corresponds with the location of the baseball on the top, the second mass would eventually meet with the baseball.

As to how a wormhole might work, picture two people, person A and person B. Person A stays on Earth, while person B takes off in a spacecraft. At takeoff, their watches are in perfect syncronization. The closer person B's spacecraft travels to the speed of light, the slower time will pass for person B (relative to person A). If person B travels for just a few hours at 50 percent the speed of light and returns to Earth, it will be obvious to both people that person A has aged much faster than person B. This difference in aging is because time passed much faster for person A than person B, who was traveling closer to the speed of light. Many years might have passed for person A, while person B experienced a time lapse of just a few hours.

If we picture a scenario in which we would want to travel to Sirius, a star that's seen in the Canis Major constellation just below Orion. Sirius is about 9 light-years from Earth, which is about 54 trillion miles (90 trillion km). Obviously, this distance would be far too great for space travelers to traverse and return in time to tell us about what they saw there. So far, the farthest people have traveled into space is to the moon, which is only about 248,548 miles (about 400,000 km) away from Earth. If we could find a wormhole that connected us to the space around Sirius, then we could cut the time considerably by avoiding the trillions of miles that we would have to cross with traditional space travel.
 
Reverend Blair
#19
Quote:

Transporting humans through teleportation would be very very unlikey.

That's likely why they used sub-atomic particles. Either that or everybody they wanted to volunteer had seen The Fly.
 
jimmoyer
#20
If by some chance you and a camera could travel past the speed of light and go so much faster than the speed of light leaving this planet, you could turn your camera back on Earth and film Columbus crossing the ocean blue in 1492.

Happy Columbus Day !
 
#juan
#21
Does this help?

http://tinyurl.com/ac73x
 
#juan
#22
Or this?

http://tinyurl.com/9wq2p
 
Dexter Sinister
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

If you are driving down the highway at light speed and turn on your headlights, what happens?

Um... your headlights come on?

Pointless question, really, because you can't go that fast, but that's also a useless answer. We can, however, speculate a bit. It depends on the observer's state of motion with respect to the car. The basic principle of relativity, that the speed of light is the same for all observers, suggests you in the car would see your headlights illuminate the road in front of you as they normally would, because you're not moving with respect to your headlights. The speed of light as it leaves your headlights is what it always is, relative to your point of view. Assuming it's dark, of course. If it's daylight, you won't notice any difference.

So what would people standing by the road as you zoomed by see? They'd see an infinitely massive, infinitely short car go by, emitting great gobs of cerenkov radiation, as Nascar_James explained, and frying everybody in the neighbourhood. Ever seen a photo of the containment water in a nuclear power reactor? It glows blue because of all the high energy nuclear particles zipping through it at faster than the speed of light in water.

Somebody standing in front of your speeding car would see an infinitely massive object approaching, emitting very high energy radiation. I haven't done the calculation, but it'd be up there in the hard gamma ray range. The doppler effect, as #jaun's tinyurl links show, shifts the wavelength of light from your headlights way over into the shorter wavelength end of the spectrum. And somebody behind the car might see a massive black hole receding into the distance and sucking up everything in its path...

The real answer is that nobody knows, all the equations break down when you consider a massive object travelling at light speed. Frankly, I didn't do the calculation because I can't; nobody can. As you approach light speed, you get increasingly massive and more and more energy input is required to get another increment of speed, you shrink in the direction of motion, and your clocks run progressively more slowly. That's from the perspective of somebody watching you zoom by, you wouldn't notice a thing. When you actually get to light speed, certain quantities (notably your mass and energy content) become infinite in the equations, and you find yourself doing forbidden mathematical operations, like dividing by zero. Which is why physics says you can't do this and it's a pointless question.

But if ya wanna talk about what happens if you get your car up to 99.9999999999999999999999999999% of the speed of light, that we can deal with.
 
MMMike
#24
You should check out the book 'The Elegant Universe' by Brian Greene. It touches on stuff like this, and with string theory and a lot of other cool stuff.
 
Canucklehead
#25
Maybe one of you more scientifically inclined types can correct/clarify this...

Wasn't the teleportation that Rev mentioned essentially duplicating the sub-atomic states/properties of atoms in another location so that they were identical? Kinda like using a blueprint to replicate the same item/atom as oppsed to actually moving the item/atom from point A to point B?

I haven't heard about the time travel experiments though... any links available that a relative layman could understand?
 
Frappuccino Dibs
#26
It could be argued that you would not know if you could see if the lights were shining anyway.

Let me explain.

Black is not a colour. Black is in fact the absence of colour.

White is acheived by mixing all colours together. I'm sure we've all done the spinning top with all colours of the rainbow on it - when it's spun it turns white.

Ok - now lets take into account the fact that we see anything because the light from it enters our eyes.

If you were travelling at the speed of light faceing the direction your going all the light and colour you could see would blend and become white.

Look behind you and what do you see? Nothing - blackness. This is because you would be moving away from all light before it had a chance to enter the eye.

I suspect if you could travel at the speed of light - you would be flying blind anyway.

Of course, this is just the Frap theory of light speed. I came up with this over an Orange Mocha Frappuccino.

It's probably a complete load of bollox.
 
Ten Packs
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Reverend Blair

The light will be compressed to the point where you cannot see it.

If you've ever watched racing something odd happens with the sound...it changes as the cars go past. That's because the sound waves are travelling at a different rate in relation to the car. The sound is compressed as the car approaches, but spreads back out as the car passes.

You can notice that on the highway as well, but not as easily because the speeds are lower and the bastards make us use mufflers.

Light works on the same basic principle.

I did a crappy job explaining that, but I hope you get the idea. If you ask a silly question, I'll answer it anyway.

Actually, that's not too bad an explanation, except that it is the relative speed of the sound as it relates to YOU, the bystander.
Google "Doppler Effect".
 
no1important
#28
In 1993, the idea of teleportation moved out of the realm of science fiction and into the world of theoretical possibility (external - login to view) It was then that physicist Charles Bennett and a team of researchers at IBM confirmed that quantum teleportation was possible, but only if the original object being teleported was destroyed. This revelation, first announced by Bennett at an annual meeting of the American Physical Society in March 1993, was followed by a report on his findings in the March 29, 1993 issue of Physical Review Letters. Since that time, experiments using photons have proven that quantum teleportation is in fact possible.

Click above link for rest.



btw- how do you think Aliens abduct people?
 
neocon-hunter
#29
I can see lasers and atoms maybe, but people or other objects such as tv's, chairs would be a diferent story. Probably impossible, but in a few thousand years, who knows?
 
Vanni Fucci
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Frappuccino Dibs

Of course, this is just the Frap theory of light speed. I came up with this over an Orange Mocha Frappuccino.

It's probably a complete load of bollox.

Probably...but it's enough to base a religion on, so wotthehell...
 

Similar Threads

5
Question...
by tooker | Jan 27th, 2008
no new posts