A small victory!!!


peapod
#1
BACKGROUNDER

Judicial Review of Church House Fish Farm Site
The Judicial Review of the process that, in the fall of 2002, led to the approval of the Church House fish farm site commences today in B.C. Supreme Court. The site, which is located directly in front of the traditional village and reserve of the Homalco First Nation, known as Church House, is at the mouth of Bute Inlet and on the migration route of wild salmon that spawn in Southgate, Homathco and Orford Rivers in Bute Inlet.

The provincial conduct with regard to consultation and accommodation that is being challenged in the Judicial Review is regarding a license amendment to introduce Atlantic salmon into production at the Marine Harvest fish farm at the mouth of Bute Inlet.

On December 24, 2004, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Ian Pitfield ruled that, in light of the Haida decision from the Supreme Court of Canada, the circumstances surrounding the Province’s conduct with respect to consultation to move Atlantic salmon so close to the mouth of Bute Inlet demonstrated that there is a good prima facie case for Homalco to argue that they were not properly consulted. He also found that there could be irreparable harm as a result of moving Atlantic salmon into a watershed such as the Bute Inlet and that this irreparable harm should be avoided until a full hearing on the duty to consult was held.

In addition to the Judicial Review, Justice Pitfield also granted the Homalco an interim injunction, ordering Marine Harvest, the fish-farming arm of the Dutch trans-national Nutreco, to halt Atlantic salmon transfers to the Church House site and remove any fish put there after the Homalco filed its action on December 22.

The ruling of Justice Pitfield was upheld on January 14, 2005, when Justice Braidwood of the BC Court of Appeal denied the application of Marine Harvest Canada, to appeal the interim injunction. The Province supported Marine Harvest in seeking leave to appeal.


For further information please contact:

Chief Darren Blaney, Xwémalhkwu (Homalco) First Nation - 250-287-0204

Peter Grant, Hutchins Grant and Associates – 604-209-1662 (cell) or 604-685-1229

Eric Blueschke, Georgia Strait Alliance – 250-334-6482
 
peapod
#2
BACKGROUNDER

Judicial Review of Church House Fish Farm Site
The Judicial Review of the process that, in the fall of 2002, led to the approval of the Church House fish farm site commences today in B.C. Supreme Court. The site, which is located directly in front of the traditional village and reserve of the Homalco First Nation, known as Church House, is at the mouth of Bute Inlet and on the migration route of wild salmon that spawn in Southgate, Homathco and Orford Rivers in Bute Inlet.

The provincial conduct with regard to consultation and accommodation that is being challenged in the Judicial Review is regarding a license amendment to introduce Atlantic salmon into production at the Marine Harvest fish farm at the mouth of Bute Inlet.

On December 24, 2004, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Ian Pitfield ruled that, in light of the Haida decision from the Supreme Court of Canada, the circumstances surrounding the Province’s conduct with respect to consultation to move Atlantic salmon so close to the mouth of Bute Inlet demonstrated that there is a good prima facie case for Homalco to argue that they were not properly consulted. He also found that there could be irreparable harm as a result of moving Atlantic salmon into a watershed such as the Bute Inlet and that this irreparable harm should be avoided until a full hearing on the duty to consult was held.

In addition to the Judicial Review, Justice Pitfield also granted the Homalco an interim injunction, ordering Marine Harvest, the fish-farming arm of the Dutch trans-national Nutreco, to halt Atlantic salmon transfers to the Church House site and remove any fish put there after the Homalco filed its action on December 22.

The ruling of Justice Pitfield was upheld on January 14, 2005, when Justice Braidwood of the BC Court of Appeal denied the application of Marine Harvest Canada, to appeal the interim injunction. The Province supported Marine Harvest in seeking leave to appeal.


For further information please contact:

Chief Darren Blaney, Xwémalhkwu (Homalco) First Nation - 250-287-0204

Peter Grant, Hutchins Grant and Associates – 604-209-1662 (cell) or 604-685-1229

Eric Blueschke, Georgia Strait Alliance – 250-334-6482
 
peapod
#3
BACKGROUNDER

Judicial Review of Church House Fish Farm Site
The Judicial Review of the process that, in the fall of 2002, led to the approval of the Church House fish farm site commences today in B.C. Supreme Court. The site, which is located directly in front of the traditional village and reserve of the Homalco First Nation, known as Church House, is at the mouth of Bute Inlet and on the migration route of wild salmon that spawn in Southgate, Homathco and Orford Rivers in Bute Inlet.

The provincial conduct with regard to consultation and accommodation that is being challenged in the Judicial Review is regarding a license amendment to introduce Atlantic salmon into production at the Marine Harvest fish farm at the mouth of Bute Inlet.

On December 24, 2004, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Ian Pitfield ruled that, in light of the Haida decision from the Supreme Court of Canada, the circumstances surrounding the Province’s conduct with respect to consultation to move Atlantic salmon so close to the mouth of Bute Inlet demonstrated that there is a good prima facie case for Homalco to argue that they were not properly consulted. He also found that there could be irreparable harm as a result of moving Atlantic salmon into a watershed such as the Bute Inlet and that this irreparable harm should be avoided until a full hearing on the duty to consult was held.

In addition to the Judicial Review, Justice Pitfield also granted the Homalco an interim injunction, ordering Marine Harvest, the fish-farming arm of the Dutch trans-national Nutreco, to halt Atlantic salmon transfers to the Church House site and remove any fish put there after the Homalco filed its action on December 22.

The ruling of Justice Pitfield was upheld on January 14, 2005, when Justice Braidwood of the BC Court of Appeal denied the application of Marine Harvest Canada, to appeal the interim injunction. The Province supported Marine Harvest in seeking leave to appeal.


For further information please contact:

Chief Darren Blaney, Xwémalhkwu (Homalco) First Nation - 250-287-0204

Peter Grant, Hutchins Grant and Associates – 604-209-1662 (cell) or 604-685-1229

Eric Blueschke, Georgia Strait Alliance – 250-334-6482
 
Twila
#4
That's fabulous!

Now if DFO would just pretend to care about their jobs and investigate why the Fraser River salmon are disappearing............................
 
Twila
#5
That's fabulous!

Now if DFO would just pretend to care about their jobs and investigate why the Fraser River salmon are disappearing............................
 
Twila
#6
That's fabulous!

Now if DFO would just pretend to care about their jobs and investigate why the Fraser River salmon are disappearing............................
 
Twila
#7
Maybe this will be the first of many double takes on fish farming.

Here's a map that shows all the fish farms in BC alone.

http://[[img]http://img.photobucket.....jpg[/img]
 
Twila
#8
Maybe this will be the first of many double takes on fish farming.

Here's a map that shows all the fish farms in BC alone.

http://[[img]http://img.photobucket.....jpg[/img]
 
Twila
#9
Maybe this will be the first of many double takes on fish farming.

Here's a map that shows all the fish farms in BC alone.

http://[[img]http://img.photobucket.....jpg[/img]
 
peapod
#10
Amazing how many just appeared!! Remember when ottawa said just because there is a fish farm at a site "there was no proof that a harmful alteration of habitat would occur". This is starting to turn around and now a fish farm on a new site would have to be properly authorized and go thru a CEAA review. That would mean they would actually have to do their job :P The DFO should be run outa town on a rail...

I spend alot of time in the broughton archipelago. To me it is the most beautiful place I have ever seen, especially in a kayak. To see this beautiful place infested with these farms is a blight on this raw and wild place. There was a time when you would not see a sea lion with a gunshot wound on him, now everytime I make a trip there I see one of these majestic animals with a gunshot wound. And we all know who is killing them!!!
 
peapod
#11
Amazing how many just appeared!! Remember when ottawa said just because there is a fish farm at a site "there was no proof that a harmful alteration of habitat would occur". This is starting to turn around and now a fish farm on a new site would have to be properly authorized and go thru a CEAA review. That would mean they would actually have to do their job :P The DFO should be run outa town on a rail...

I spend alot of time in the broughton archipelago. To me it is the most beautiful place I have ever seen, especially in a kayak. To see this beautiful place infested with these farms is a blight on this raw and wild place. There was a time when you would not see a sea lion with a gunshot wound on him, now everytime I make a trip there I see one of these majestic animals with a gunshot wound. And we all know who is killing them!!!
 
peapod
#12
Amazing how many just appeared!! Remember when ottawa said just because there is a fish farm at a site "there was no proof that a harmful alteration of habitat would occur". This is starting to turn around and now a fish farm on a new site would have to be properly authorized and go thru a CEAA review. That would mean they would actually have to do their job :P The DFO should be run outa town on a rail...

I spend alot of time in the broughton archipelago. To me it is the most beautiful place I have ever seen, especially in a kayak. To see this beautiful place infested with these farms is a blight on this raw and wild place. There was a time when you would not see a sea lion with a gunshot wound on him, now everytime I make a trip there I see one of these majestic animals with a gunshot wound. And we all know who is killing them!!!
 
Twila
#13
It's disgusting. Some fish live in ponds and lakes and to farm them cleanly, effectively, and economically is easily done.

Some fish are not pond dwellers.

What it all boils down to is that the Gov't does not have to follow the law like us tax payers do....
 
Twila
#14
It's disgusting. Some fish live in ponds and lakes and to farm them cleanly, effectively, and economically is easily done.

Some fish are not pond dwellers.

What it all boils down to is that the Gov't does not have to follow the law like us tax payers do....
 
Twila
#15
It's disgusting. Some fish live in ponds and lakes and to farm them cleanly, effectively, and economically is easily done.

Some fish are not pond dwellers.

What it all boils down to is that the Gov't does not have to follow the law like us tax payers do....
 
peapod
#16
I know its so disquisting. They don't want to use a closed loop system to farm...to expensive...not enough profit Now they want to farm halibut
Do you remember when this happened??



This spring saw a wave of new fish farm incidents that underscored our long-standing concerns with the industry's practices and impacts on the marine environment. It began with the discovery by Tofino residents of at least two uncovered burial pits—just days before the designation of the new Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve—containing at least 14 dead sea lions that had been shot by a local fish farm. Ironically, the farm's manager, Bill Vernon, and his company, Creative Salmon Ltd., had just been given an award by the BC aquaculture industry for "leadership" in advancing the industry's new Code of Practice!

It's also worth noting that Vernon's farm was legally permitted by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) to kill Stellar Sea Lions (currently listed as endangered) to protect its netcage fish—despite the government's introduction of a Species at Risk Act and the location of the farm in the midst of a prime tourism area. More pits of dead sea lions have been found in the area since, bringing the total to around 40 dead animals.

A few months prior to the discovery of the sea lion pits, GSA's Howard Breen had informed government that a former employee from a Clayoquot Sound farm had come forward to say that the farm was routinely discarding seal and sea lion carcasses in the ocean, tying bags filled with rocks to them to ensure they sunk out of sight.

As a result, DFO visited 14 farms and carried out a lengthy investigation, finding serious non-compliance with licence requirements vis-ŕ-vis recovery of kills, submission of samples to DFO, burying of carcasses, firearms and reporting of kills, as well as failure by DFO to ensure quarterly reporting by farms. We are not aware of any charges having been laid to date and DFO appears to be treating these infractions and the recent Clayoquot incident as symptomatic of a "disposal problem" for fish farms rather than an argument for the need for closed containment technology.

The west coast of Vancouver Island was also hit with a major escape of farmed salmon in early May, when a boat's propeller tore a net at Amai Inlet in Kyuquot Sound. More than 30,000 female chinook salmon escaped—potentially to wreak havoc with the gene pool of wild chinook.

When the provincial government announced its policy decision on salmon aquaculture last fall, it promised to relocate "problem" farms. This spring 11 farms were selected (see below) for the "first wave" of relocations (more will come this fall), based on criteria that include proximity to significant salmon streams and First Nations reserves, conflicts with upland users and poor flushing leading to waste buildup (except for one farm that was to be relocated to accommodate a logging operation.

COMPANY FARM(S) TO BE MOVED PROPOSED NEW SITE(S)
Prime Pacific Sea Farms Sooke Basin site to be determined
Stolt Sea Farms Carrie Bay & Eden Island Doctor Islets (Knight Inlet) & Bamber Pt.
(Tribune Channel)
Heritage Aquaculture
(formerly BC Packers) Penny Creek & San Mateo (west coast of Vancouver Island) Bay Broken Islands (Johnstone Strait)
& 2nd site to be determined
Marine Harvest Canada (Nutreco Canada) Orchard Bay & Kanish Bay Clio Channel (Broughton Archipelago)Jackson Passage (Klemtu)-in final stages of approval

Omega Salmon Group Sansum Narrows & Redonda Bay Browning Islands (south of Marsh Bay)
Robertson Island (Queen Charlotte Strait)
Creative Salmon Company Fortune Channel site to be determined
Liard Aquaculture Chancellor Channel same area (to accommodate a logging)
in final stages of approval


Although the relocations were expected to ease some of the problems caused by fish farms, both the process and the new sites proposed are causing anger among local residents. To our surprise, several of the farms are to be moved into the already over-subscribed Broughton Archipelago—despite former Fisheries Minister Dennis Streifel's comment last summer that he hoped "to ease some of the pressure on the Broughton". Local residents say that some of the proposed areas, such as Doctor Islets, Bamber Point and Clio Channel, are extremely sensitive, "some of the best habitat left" in the Broughton. Some local residents have even pledged a blockade.

The area is a recreational gem and an ecosystem which is already approaching collapse. For example, oolichan did not return to Kingcome Inlet this spring, and many people believe this is a result of disruptions to the ecoystem from bright night-lighting used by fish farms to promote rapid growth. Relocation will allow farms to expand their production. In early May, resident and GSA member Alexandra Morton said, "Already this spring the algae blooms have begun, even with the low temperatures. The Broughton is sending us a signal that it is already overloaded with wastes."

The relocations are being fast-tracked through a process of "open houses" that have been poorly publicized and in the case of the Broughton farms, took place in Port McNeil and Port Hardy—a long boat ride away from the area where the farms are proposed to go. Not surprisingly, residents of affected communities such as Echo Bay, Gilford Village, Sointula and Alert Bay were angry at the short notice and lack of information they received prior to these open houses. Some of the proposed sites were changed after the notice went out, so that residents arrived prepared to talk about the wrong sites. Some stakeholders, such as eco-tourism operators who work in the affected areas, were not informed at all.

As Alexandra Morton recently said, "I don't know how many places on earth can be destroyed by corporate activity before we are no longer a viable species, but my sense is that we are close to that number now."
 
peapod
#17
I know its so disquisting. They don't want to use a closed loop system to farm...to expensive...not enough profit Now they want to farm halibut
Do you remember when this happened??



This spring saw a wave of new fish farm incidents that underscored our long-standing concerns with the industry's practices and impacts on the marine environment. It began with the discovery by Tofino residents of at least two uncovered burial pits—just days before the designation of the new Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve—containing at least 14 dead sea lions that had been shot by a local fish farm. Ironically, the farm's manager, Bill Vernon, and his company, Creative Salmon Ltd., had just been given an award by the BC aquaculture industry for "leadership" in advancing the industry's new Code of Practice!

It's also worth noting that Vernon's farm was legally permitted by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) to kill Stellar Sea Lions (currently listed as endangered) to protect its netcage fish—despite the government's introduction of a Species at Risk Act and the location of the farm in the midst of a prime tourism area. More pits of dead sea lions have been found in the area since, bringing the total to around 40 dead animals.

A few months prior to the discovery of the sea lion pits, GSA's Howard Breen had informed government that a former employee from a Clayoquot Sound farm had come forward to say that the farm was routinely discarding seal and sea lion carcasses in the ocean, tying bags filled with rocks to them to ensure they sunk out of sight.

As a result, DFO visited 14 farms and carried out a lengthy investigation, finding serious non-compliance with licence requirements vis-ŕ-vis recovery of kills, submission of samples to DFO, burying of carcasses, firearms and reporting of kills, as well as failure by DFO to ensure quarterly reporting by farms. We are not aware of any charges having been laid to date and DFO appears to be treating these infractions and the recent Clayoquot incident as symptomatic of a "disposal problem" for fish farms rather than an argument for the need for closed containment technology.

The west coast of Vancouver Island was also hit with a major escape of farmed salmon in early May, when a boat's propeller tore a net at Amai Inlet in Kyuquot Sound. More than 30,000 female chinook salmon escaped—potentially to wreak havoc with the gene pool of wild chinook.

When the provincial government announced its policy decision on salmon aquaculture last fall, it promised to relocate "problem" farms. This spring 11 farms were selected (see below) for the "first wave" of relocations (more will come this fall), based on criteria that include proximity to significant salmon streams and First Nations reserves, conflicts with upland users and poor flushing leading to waste buildup (except for one farm that was to be relocated to accommodate a logging operation.

COMPANY FARM(S) TO BE MOVED PROPOSED NEW SITE(S)
Prime Pacific Sea Farms Sooke Basin site to be determined
Stolt Sea Farms Carrie Bay & Eden Island Doctor Islets (Knight Inlet) & Bamber Pt.
(Tribune Channel)
Heritage Aquaculture
(formerly BC Packers) Penny Creek & San Mateo (west coast of Vancouver Island) Bay Broken Islands (Johnstone Strait)
& 2nd site to be determined
Marine Harvest Canada (Nutreco Canada) Orchard Bay & Kanish Bay Clio Channel (Broughton Archipelago)Jackson Passage (Klemtu)-in final stages of approval

Omega Salmon Group Sansum Narrows & Redonda Bay Browning Islands (south of Marsh Bay)
Robertson Island (Queen Charlotte Strait)
Creative Salmon Company Fortune Channel site to be determined
Liard Aquaculture Chancellor Channel same area (to accommodate a logging)
in final stages of approval


Although the relocations were expected to ease some of the problems caused by fish farms, both the process and the new sites proposed are causing anger among local residents. To our surprise, several of the farms are to be moved into the already over-subscribed Broughton Archipelago—despite former Fisheries Minister Dennis Streifel's comment last summer that he hoped "to ease some of the pressure on the Broughton". Local residents say that some of the proposed areas, such as Doctor Islets, Bamber Point and Clio Channel, are extremely sensitive, "some of the best habitat left" in the Broughton. Some local residents have even pledged a blockade.

The area is a recreational gem and an ecosystem which is already approaching collapse. For example, oolichan did not return to Kingcome Inlet this spring, and many people believe this is a result of disruptions to the ecoystem from bright night-lighting used by fish farms to promote rapid growth. Relocation will allow farms to expand their production. In early May, resident and GSA member Alexandra Morton said, "Already this spring the algae blooms have begun, even with the low temperatures. The Broughton is sending us a signal that it is already overloaded with wastes."

The relocations are being fast-tracked through a process of "open houses" that have been poorly publicized and in the case of the Broughton farms, took place in Port McNeil and Port Hardy—a long boat ride away from the area where the farms are proposed to go. Not surprisingly, residents of affected communities such as Echo Bay, Gilford Village, Sointula and Alert Bay were angry at the short notice and lack of information they received prior to these open houses. Some of the proposed sites were changed after the notice went out, so that residents arrived prepared to talk about the wrong sites. Some stakeholders, such as eco-tourism operators who work in the affected areas, were not informed at all.

As Alexandra Morton recently said, "I don't know how many places on earth can be destroyed by corporate activity before we are no longer a viable species, but my sense is that we are close to that number now."
 
peapod
#18
I know its so disquisting. They don't want to use a closed loop system to farm...to expensive...not enough profit Now they want to farm halibut
Do you remember when this happened??



This spring saw a wave of new fish farm incidents that underscored our long-standing concerns with the industry's practices and impacts on the marine environment. It began with the discovery by Tofino residents of at least two uncovered burial pits—just days before the designation of the new Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve—containing at least 14 dead sea lions that had been shot by a local fish farm. Ironically, the farm's manager, Bill Vernon, and his company, Creative Salmon Ltd., had just been given an award by the BC aquaculture industry for "leadership" in advancing the industry's new Code of Practice!

It's also worth noting that Vernon's farm was legally permitted by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) to kill Stellar Sea Lions (currently listed as endangered) to protect its netcage fish—despite the government's introduction of a Species at Risk Act and the location of the farm in the midst of a prime tourism area. More pits of dead sea lions have been found in the area since, bringing the total to around 40 dead animals.

A few months prior to the discovery of the sea lion pits, GSA's Howard Breen had informed government that a former employee from a Clayoquot Sound farm had come forward to say that the farm was routinely discarding seal and sea lion carcasses in the ocean, tying bags filled with rocks to them to ensure they sunk out of sight.

As a result, DFO visited 14 farms and carried out a lengthy investigation, finding serious non-compliance with licence requirements vis-ŕ-vis recovery of kills, submission of samples to DFO, burying of carcasses, firearms and reporting of kills, as well as failure by DFO to ensure quarterly reporting by farms. We are not aware of any charges having been laid to date and DFO appears to be treating these infractions and the recent Clayoquot incident as symptomatic of a "disposal problem" for fish farms rather than an argument for the need for closed containment technology.

The west coast of Vancouver Island was also hit with a major escape of farmed salmon in early May, when a boat's propeller tore a net at Amai Inlet in Kyuquot Sound. More than 30,000 female chinook salmon escaped—potentially to wreak havoc with the gene pool of wild chinook.

When the provincial government announced its policy decision on salmon aquaculture last fall, it promised to relocate "problem" farms. This spring 11 farms were selected (see below) for the "first wave" of relocations (more will come this fall), based on criteria that include proximity to significant salmon streams and First Nations reserves, conflicts with upland users and poor flushing leading to waste buildup (except for one farm that was to be relocated to accommodate a logging operation.

COMPANY FARM(S) TO BE MOVED PROPOSED NEW SITE(S)
Prime Pacific Sea Farms Sooke Basin site to be determined
Stolt Sea Farms Carrie Bay & Eden Island Doctor Islets (Knight Inlet) & Bamber Pt.
(Tribune Channel)
Heritage Aquaculture
(formerly BC Packers) Penny Creek & San Mateo (west coast of Vancouver Island) Bay Broken Islands (Johnstone Strait)
& 2nd site to be determined
Marine Harvest Canada (Nutreco Canada) Orchard Bay & Kanish Bay Clio Channel (Broughton Archipelago)Jackson Passage (Klemtu)-in final stages of approval

Omega Salmon Group Sansum Narrows & Redonda Bay Browning Islands (south of Marsh Bay)
Robertson Island (Queen Charlotte Strait)
Creative Salmon Company Fortune Channel site to be determined
Liard Aquaculture Chancellor Channel same area (to accommodate a logging)
in final stages of approval


Although the relocations were expected to ease some of the problems caused by fish farms, both the process and the new sites proposed are causing anger among local residents. To our surprise, several of the farms are to be moved into the already over-subscribed Broughton Archipelago—despite former Fisheries Minister Dennis Streifel's comment last summer that he hoped "to ease some of the pressure on the Broughton". Local residents say that some of the proposed areas, such as Doctor Islets, Bamber Point and Clio Channel, are extremely sensitive, "some of the best habitat left" in the Broughton. Some local residents have even pledged a blockade.

The area is a recreational gem and an ecosystem which is already approaching collapse. For example, oolichan did not return to Kingcome Inlet this spring, and many people believe this is a result of disruptions to the ecoystem from bright night-lighting used by fish farms to promote rapid growth. Relocation will allow farms to expand their production. In early May, resident and GSA member Alexandra Morton said, "Already this spring the algae blooms have begun, even with the low temperatures. The Broughton is sending us a signal that it is already overloaded with wastes."

The relocations are being fast-tracked through a process of "open houses" that have been poorly publicized and in the case of the Broughton farms, took place in Port McNeil and Port Hardy—a long boat ride away from the area where the farms are proposed to go. Not surprisingly, residents of affected communities such as Echo Bay, Gilford Village, Sointula and Alert Bay were angry at the short notice and lack of information they received prior to these open houses. Some of the proposed sites were changed after the notice went out, so that residents arrived prepared to talk about the wrong sites. Some stakeholders, such as eco-tourism operators who work in the affected areas, were not informed at all.

As Alexandra Morton recently said, "I don't know how many places on earth can be destroyed by corporate activity before we are no longer a viable species, but my sense is that we are close to that number now."
 
Twila
#19
I wonder if the reason DFO is unwilling to investigate the disappearance of over a million sockeye salmon from Fraser river has anything to do with the fish farm pollution problem?

They've sited tension between native and non native fishers...But as both parties agree some investigating is imperative the lie is a obvious as the corruption in DFO.
 
Twila
#20
I wonder if the reason DFO is unwilling to investigate the disappearance of over a million sockeye salmon from Fraser river has anything to do with the fish farm pollution problem?

They've sited tension between native and non native fishers...But as both parties agree some investigating is imperative the lie is a obvious as the corruption in DFO.
 
Twila
#21
I wonder if the reason DFO is unwilling to investigate the disappearance of over a million sockeye salmon from Fraser river has anything to do with the fish farm pollution problem?

They've sited tension between native and non native fishers...But as both parties agree some investigating is imperative the lie is a obvious as the corruption in DFO.
 
peapod
#22
Twila I think its more the management of the DFO than the workers, preventing them from doing the job they were trained and hired to do...remember that case in campbell river...The 40 fishermen that ignored the closing and went fishing anyway. They all plead guilty, but the judge gave them absolute discharge, and criticized the DFO.

"Unquestionably on the facts of this case, the DFO has not acted in an even-handed way toward all commercial sockeye fishermen," said the judge"

"
"DFO responded to the protests by sending out officers in several boats to lay charges and used aircraft to monitor the vessels. The irony of their response, according to testimony heard during the case, was that DFO officers were given very little resources and were ordered to not lay charges against First Nations people who were illegally fishing along the Fraser River"

"The plea of budgetary constraints emerges from the evidence but the objective observer must be forgiven for a degree of skepticism in light of the fact that the DFO managed to muster men, equipment and aircraft to investigate and prosecute these non-aboriginal defendants who had the temerity to make their case publicly."

Not only did the judge criticize DFO management for their apparent pro-native bias but he also said the federal fisheries department lacks the courage to provide equal fishing opportunities to all Canadians as set out by the Supreme Court of Canada.

Soon enough we will be just like the maritimes when it comes to our fishing industry.
 
peapod
#23
Twila I think its more the management of the DFO than the workers, preventing them from doing the job they were trained and hired to do...remember that case in campbell river...The 40 fishermen that ignored the closing and went fishing anyway. They all plead guilty, but the judge gave them absolute discharge, and criticized the DFO.

"Unquestionably on the facts of this case, the DFO has not acted in an even-handed way toward all commercial sockeye fishermen," said the judge"

"
"DFO responded to the protests by sending out officers in several boats to lay charges and used aircraft to monitor the vessels. The irony of their response, according to testimony heard during the case, was that DFO officers were given very little resources and were ordered to not lay charges against First Nations people who were illegally fishing along the Fraser River"

"The plea of budgetary constraints emerges from the evidence but the objective observer must be forgiven for a degree of skepticism in light of the fact that the DFO managed to muster men, equipment and aircraft to investigate and prosecute these non-aboriginal defendants who had the temerity to make their case publicly."

Not only did the judge criticize DFO management for their apparent pro-native bias but he also said the federal fisheries department lacks the courage to provide equal fishing opportunities to all Canadians as set out by the Supreme Court of Canada.

Soon enough we will be just like the maritimes when it comes to our fishing industry.
 
peapod
#24
Twila I think its more the management of the DFO than the workers, preventing them from doing the job they were trained and hired to do...remember that case in campbell river...The 40 fishermen that ignored the closing and went fishing anyway. They all plead guilty, but the judge gave them absolute discharge, and criticized the DFO.

"Unquestionably on the facts of this case, the DFO has not acted in an even-handed way toward all commercial sockeye fishermen," said the judge"

"
"DFO responded to the protests by sending out officers in several boats to lay charges and used aircraft to monitor the vessels. The irony of their response, according to testimony heard during the case, was that DFO officers were given very little resources and were ordered to not lay charges against First Nations people who were illegally fishing along the Fraser River"

"The plea of budgetary constraints emerges from the evidence but the objective observer must be forgiven for a degree of skepticism in light of the fact that the DFO managed to muster men, equipment and aircraft to investigate and prosecute these non-aboriginal defendants who had the temerity to make their case publicly."

Not only did the judge criticize DFO management for their apparent pro-native bias but he also said the federal fisheries department lacks the courage to provide equal fishing opportunities to all Canadians as set out by the Supreme Court of Canada.

Soon enough we will be just like the maritimes when it comes to our fishing industry.
 
Twila
#25
I do remember that case.


I'm privy to some talks between DFO, First Nations and commercial fisherman that were held quit recently due to the short fall in salmon (perks of my job) And from where I sit it seems to be government screw ups all the way down the river.
 
Twila
#26
I do remember that case.


I'm privy to some talks between DFO, First Nations and commercial fisherman that were held quit recently due to the short fall in salmon (perks of my job) And from where I sit it seems to be government screw ups all the way down the river.
 
Twila
#27
I do remember that case.


I'm privy to some talks between DFO, First Nations and commercial fisherman that were held quit recently due to the short fall in salmon (perks of my job) And from where I sit it seems to be government screw ups all the way down the river.
 
peapod
#28
Thats why the "civil disobedence" must be kept going
 
peapod
#29
Thats why the "civil disobedence" must be kept going
 
peapod
#30
Thats why the "civil disobedence" must be kept going
 

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