Come and solve an argument


aardvark5
#1
Somebody must have proof of a debate we're having here in England. For a few days a debate has gone on about the Canadian Border and I think this particular picture is rubbish. Please read the thread and your expertise as Canadians will be appreciated - forums.overclockers.co.uk/sho...0&pagenumber=1 (external - login to view)
 
aardvark5
#2
Somebody must have proof of a debate we're having here in England. For a few days a debate has gone on about the Canadian Border and I think this particular picture is rubbish. Please read the thread and your expertise as Canadians will be appreciated - forums.overclockers.co.uk/sho...0&pagenumber=1 (external - login to view)
 
aardvark5
#3
Somebody must have proof of a debate we're having here in England. For a few days a debate has gone on about the Canadian Border and I think this particular picture is rubbish. Please read the thread and your expertise as Canadians will be appreciated - forums.overclockers.co.uk/sho...0&pagenumber=1 (external - login to view)
 
Reverend Blair
#4
I can't say for sure, but if I had to guess I's say it's either a powerline or a pipeline. The guy who keeps saying it's the border has the right idea...they cut the trees down there so you can see the snow.

You never say what part of Canada it's in. It doesn't look like the Rockies though. You see a lot of cuts like that in Western Ontario, but that doesn't look like the right kind of terrain and the plane appears to be high up for the width of the cut.
 
Reverend Blair
#5
I can't say for sure, but if I had to guess I's say it's either a powerline or a pipeline. The guy who keeps saying it's the border has the right idea...they cut the trees down there so you can see the snow.

You never say what part of Canada it's in. It doesn't look like the Rockies though. You see a lot of cuts like that in Western Ontario, but that doesn't look like the right kind of terrain and the plane appears to be high up for the width of the cut.
 
Reverend Blair
#6
I can't say for sure, but if I had to guess I's say it's either a powerline or a pipeline. The guy who keeps saying it's the border has the right idea...they cut the trees down there so you can see the snow.

You never say what part of Canada it's in. It doesn't look like the Rockies though. You see a lot of cuts like that in Western Ontario, but that doesn't look like the right kind of terrain and the plane appears to be high up for the width of the cut.
 
Matty
#7
Well, I think its something on the window. If you really look at the picture there are parts of the line that dont follow the terrain exactly. I didnt think we actually marked our border in such a fashion, but mahaps im wrong :P
 
Matty
#8
Well, I think its something on the window. If you really look at the picture there are parts of the line that dont follow the terrain exactly. I didnt think we actually marked our border in such a fashion, but mahaps im wrong :P
 
Matty
#9
Well, I think its something on the window. If you really look at the picture there are parts of the line that dont follow the terrain exactly. I didnt think we actually marked our border in such a fashion, but mahaps im wrong :P
 
Twila
#10
I like the response about it being a giant snail. Maybe sasquatch has a pet?
 
Twila
#11
I like the response about it being a giant snail. Maybe sasquatch has a pet?
 
Twila
#12
I like the response about it being a giant snail. Maybe sasquatch has a pet?
 
moghrabi
#13
This line was drawn by Bush when Canada did not join him in attacking Iraq. He decided to draw the line between the 2 countries.
 
moghrabi
#14
This line was drawn by Bush when Canada did not join him in attacking Iraq. He decided to draw the line between the 2 countries.
 
moghrabi
#15
This line was drawn by Bush when Canada did not join him in attacking Iraq. He decided to draw the line between the 2 countries.
 
Judland
#16
Been flying to a several mine sites in Northern Saskatchewan for the past year and that terrain is very similar.

There are a lot of survey lines like that (surveying for uranium) but none that I've seen as wide as that one in the picture.

It's possible the plane isn't too terribly high, making the clearing seem wider than it is. The trees in this part of the country tend to be shorter. Mostly sandy soil and little rain fall on average.

Being on the boarder could mean the boarder between the NWT and Alaska.

I'd also tend to believe it is a clearing for a pipeline or power lines. It would help to know where the photo was taken (other than from inside a plane in mid-flight ).
 
Judland
#17
Been flying to a several mine sites in Northern Saskatchewan for the past year and that terrain is very similar.

There are a lot of survey lines like that (surveying for uranium) but none that I've seen as wide as that one in the picture.

It's possible the plane isn't too terribly high, making the clearing seem wider than it is. The trees in this part of the country tend to be shorter. Mostly sandy soil and little rain fall on average.

Being on the boarder could mean the boarder between the NWT and Alaska.

I'd also tend to believe it is a clearing for a pipeline or power lines. It would help to know where the photo was taken (other than from inside a plane in mid-flight ).
 
Judland
#18
Been flying to a several mine sites in Northern Saskatchewan for the past year and that terrain is very similar.

There are a lot of survey lines like that (surveying for uranium) but none that I've seen as wide as that one in the picture.

It's possible the plane isn't too terribly high, making the clearing seem wider than it is. The trees in this part of the country tend to be shorter. Mostly sandy soil and little rain fall on average.

Being on the boarder could mean the boarder between the NWT and Alaska.

I'd also tend to believe it is a clearing for a pipeline or power lines. It would help to know where the photo was taken (other than from inside a plane in mid-flight ).
 
Dexter Sinister
#19
Insufficient data to solve it so far. The US-Canada border is straight for hundreds of miles only along the 49th parallel from Manitoba to British Columbia. There's a stretch of about 150 miles between Quebec and Vermont that's straight, but the first post in that link specified "hundreds of miles," which disqualifies that location. Or perhaps the poster was a little inaccurate? It does look more like the terrain between Quebec and Vermont than it does anything in western Canada. It's clearly not Manitoba or Saskatchewan, there's no terrain along the 49th parallel in those provinces that looks like that, so it'd have to be Alberta or British Columbia. But it doesn't look like the mountains I've seen while flying between Calgary and Vancouver either, they're much more angular and pointy.

Other factors: it'd be very unusual for a plane to precisely follow either the 49th parallel or the Quebec-Vermont border for a long time, those paths don't join any major airports. The only reason to do so would be to fly in the jetstream, so it'd have to be an east-bound flight, but the jetstream is rarely straight for hundreds of miles either. Nature doesn't usually operate in straight lines, only people do.

My first thought was that the picture's a Photoshopped fake. I saved it and had a close look at it, and there are places where the line doesn't seem to quite follow the terrain. Besides, for the line to appear that wide from 35,000 feet, it'd have to be many miles wide on the ground, and as far as I know we don't clear vegetation along the border like that, or paint the landscape to mark it. Double besides, the line is white, suggesting snow fills it, but there'd have to be a lot more snow elsewhere in the image to justify that belief. I think it's a fake.

Or a giant slug trail. What, you've never heard of the giant mountain slugs in British Columbia? Whole towns have been engulfed...
 
Dexter Sinister
#20
Insufficient data to solve it so far. The US-Canada border is straight for hundreds of miles only along the 49th parallel from Manitoba to British Columbia. There's a stretch of about 150 miles between Quebec and Vermont that's straight, but the first post in that link specified "hundreds of miles," which disqualifies that location. Or perhaps the poster was a little inaccurate? It does look more like the terrain between Quebec and Vermont than it does anything in western Canada. It's clearly not Manitoba or Saskatchewan, there's no terrain along the 49th parallel in those provinces that looks like that, so it'd have to be Alberta or British Columbia. But it doesn't look like the mountains I've seen while flying between Calgary and Vancouver either, they're much more angular and pointy.

Other factors: it'd be very unusual for a plane to precisely follow either the 49th parallel or the Quebec-Vermont border for a long time, those paths don't join any major airports. The only reason to do so would be to fly in the jetstream, so it'd have to be an east-bound flight, but the jetstream is rarely straight for hundreds of miles either. Nature doesn't usually operate in straight lines, only people do.

My first thought was that the picture's a Photoshopped fake. I saved it and had a close look at it, and there are places where the line doesn't seem to quite follow the terrain. Besides, for the line to appear that wide from 35,000 feet, it'd have to be many miles wide on the ground, and as far as I know we don't clear vegetation along the border like that, or paint the landscape to mark it. Double besides, the line is white, suggesting snow fills it, but there'd have to be a lot more snow elsewhere in the image to justify that belief. I think it's a fake.

Or a giant slug trail. What, you've never heard of the giant mountain slugs in British Columbia? Whole towns have been engulfed...
 
Dexter Sinister
#21
Insufficient data to solve it so far. The US-Canada border is straight for hundreds of miles only along the 49th parallel from Manitoba to British Columbia. There's a stretch of about 150 miles between Quebec and Vermont that's straight, but the first post in that link specified "hundreds of miles," which disqualifies that location. Or perhaps the poster was a little inaccurate? It does look more like the terrain between Quebec and Vermont than it does anything in western Canada. It's clearly not Manitoba or Saskatchewan, there's no terrain along the 49th parallel in those provinces that looks like that, so it'd have to be Alberta or British Columbia. But it doesn't look like the mountains I've seen while flying between Calgary and Vancouver either, they're much more angular and pointy.

Other factors: it'd be very unusual for a plane to precisely follow either the 49th parallel or the Quebec-Vermont border for a long time, those paths don't join any major airports. The only reason to do so would be to fly in the jetstream, so it'd have to be an east-bound flight, but the jetstream is rarely straight for hundreds of miles either. Nature doesn't usually operate in straight lines, only people do.

My first thought was that the picture's a Photoshopped fake. I saved it and had a close look at it, and there are places where the line doesn't seem to quite follow the terrain. Besides, for the line to appear that wide from 35,000 feet, it'd have to be many miles wide on the ground, and as far as I know we don't clear vegetation along the border like that, or paint the landscape to mark it. Double besides, the line is white, suggesting snow fills it, but there'd have to be a lot more snow elsewhere in the image to justify that belief. I think it's a fake.

Or a giant slug trail. What, you've never heard of the giant mountain slugs in British Columbia? Whole towns have been engulfed...
 
Gonzo
#22
Could be photoshoped.
 
Gonzo
#23
Could be photoshoped.
 
Gonzo
#24
Could be photoshoped.
 
Ten Packs
#25
Oh, for Heaven's Sakes, people!

As:
1. a British Columbian
2. One who worked as a welder's helper on 30" pipeline, for a short time in the 70's
3. One who spent most of 1979 flying all over BC, on assignment by my employer.
4. Worked for the largest Oil Company in the country for 27 years, the last 13 years at a Distribution facility, supplied by Pipeline from Edmonton.


I can POSITIVELY tell you it is one of several very common sights out West, and probably in Quebec and so on as well:
1. Right-of-way for high-tension Hydro-electric cross-provincial lines.*
2. Right-of-way for underground oil or natural gas lines.*
3. The Canada/USA border, as suggested earlier.

*All of which require substantial cut-back, both for access during construction, access for maintenance and emergencies, and aerial monitoring (they have airborne electronic instruments that can check for problems and weaknesses in the pipeline, even underground).

I have seen all kinds of these, flying around BC. And YES, they go in straight lines for MILES, regardless of all but the worst of terrain. I remember carrying the ground-cable for a boom-welder on a big cat, and its radiator was sometimes 15 feet behind me -
and ten feet ABOVE! (GULP!)

In fact, if you look closely near the left edge of the pic, you can see two instances of shadows on the down-hill slope in the "slash-trail", as they are called.

Believe me - you can take this to the bank!




[edited for additional thoughts; and bad typing caused by a combination of Friday night and vodka]
 
Ten Packs
#26
Oh, for Heaven's Sakes, people!

As:
1. a British Columbian
2. One who worked as a welder's helper on 30" pipeline, for a short time in the 70's
3. One who spent most of 1979 flying all over BC, on assignment by my employer.
4. Worked for the largest Oil Company in the country for 27 years, the last 13 years at a Distribution facility, supplied by Pipeline from Edmonton.


I can POSITIVELY tell you it is one of several very common sights out West, and probably in Quebec and so on as well:
1. Right-of-way for high-tension Hydro-electric cross-provincial lines.*
2. Right-of-way for underground oil or natural gas lines.*
3. The Canada/USA border, as suggested earlier.

*All of which require substantial cut-back, both for access during construction, access for maintenance and emergencies, and aerial monitoring (they have airborne electronic instruments that can check for problems and weaknesses in the pipeline, even underground).

I have seen all kinds of these, flying around BC. And YES, they go in straight lines for MILES, regardless of all but the worst of terrain. I remember carrying the ground-cable for a boom-welder on a big cat, and its radiator was sometimes 15 feet behind me -
and ten feet ABOVE! (GULP!)

In fact, if you look closely near the left edge of the pic, you can see two instances of shadows on the down-hill slope in the "slash-trail", as they are called.

Believe me - you can take this to the bank!




[edited for additional thoughts; and bad typing caused by a combination of Friday night and vodka]
 
Ten Packs
#27
Oh, for Heaven's Sakes, people!

As:
1. a British Columbian
2. One who worked as a welder's helper on 30" pipeline, for a short time in the 70's
3. One who spent most of 1979 flying all over BC, on assignment by my employer.
4. Worked for the largest Oil Company in the country for 27 years, the last 13 years at a Distribution facility, supplied by Pipeline from Edmonton.


I can POSITIVELY tell you it is one of several very common sights out West, and probably in Quebec and so on as well:
1. Right-of-way for high-tension Hydro-electric cross-provincial lines.*
2. Right-of-way for underground oil or natural gas lines.*
3. The Canada/USA border, as suggested earlier.

*All of which require substantial cut-back, both for access during construction, access for maintenance and emergencies, and aerial monitoring (they have airborne electronic instruments that can check for problems and weaknesses in the pipeline, even underground).

I have seen all kinds of these, flying around BC. And YES, they go in straight lines for MILES, regardless of all but the worst of terrain. I remember carrying the ground-cable for a boom-welder on a big cat, and its radiator was sometimes 15 feet behind me -
and ten feet ABOVE! (GULP!)

In fact, if you look closely near the left edge of the pic, you can see two instances of shadows on the down-hill slope in the "slash-trail", as they are called.

Believe me - you can take this to the bank!




[edited for additional thoughts; and bad typing caused by a combination of Friday night and vodka]
 
Judland
#28
Okay, calm down. No need to go bold on us.
 
Judland
#29
Okay, calm down. No need to go bold on us.
 
Judland
#30
Okay, calm down. No need to go bold on us.
 

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